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Home :: Archive :: 1998 :: August ::
Re: Prospero; KJV; CD-ROMs
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 9.0747  Monday, 10 August 1998.

[1]     From:   Scott Oldenburg <
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        Date:   Friday, 07 Aug 1998 11:01:04 -0700
        Subj:   Prospero

[2]     From:   Carol Barton <
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        Date:   Saturday, 8 Aug 1998 18:43:05 EDT
        Subj:   Re: SHK 9.0745  Re: Shakespeare and KJV

[3]     From:   Hardy M. Cook <
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        Date:   Monday, August 10, 1998
        Subj:   CD-ROMs


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Scott Oldenburg <
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Date:           Friday, 07 Aug 1998 11:01:04 -0700
Subject:        Prospero

As regards Prospero giving up his power, I think we ought to take him at
his word.  However, I have always read this as Prospero trading in one
form of power for another.  Let's not forget, he gets his Dukedom back
and now is extraordinarily well-connected in Naples.  Furthermore, by
marrying his daughter to the Prince of Naples he redirects the
inheritance of his dukedom from his brother to his son-in-law.  In the
end, Prospero has empowered himself and his daughter and disempowered
his enemies.  Not exactly abdication.

Cheers,
Scott Oldenburg

[2]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Carol Barton <
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Date:           Saturday, 8 Aug 1998 18:43:05 EDT
Subject: 9.0745  Re: Shakespeare and KJV
Comment:        Re: SHK 9.0745  Re: Shakespeare and KJV

>  Hasn't it been established that the bulk of the KJV is lifted from a
>  previous, contraband translation by a fellow named Tyndall?  That's my
>  understanding, but I'd like to hear from others who know more about
>  this.  It would have been a version around for at least 60 years before
>  King James convened his 54.  The first translator was burned at the
>  stake for daring to accomplish it, if my flawed memory serves me right.
>  So it's particularly telling that after much bashing about of brains,
>  the heretic's version wins out.
>
>  Andy White
>  Arlington, VA

That's William Tyndale, pronounced as you spelled it, and no, Andy, he
is not responsible for the KJV.  He translated the OT, then the NT, but
by no means as beautifully from a linguistic standpoint as the KJV
authors did.  Copies of his versions are widely available in
circulations today, and you might even be able to get one at the local
library, if you're interested.

Best,
Carol Barton
Department of English and Faculty Coordinator
Averett College - Northern Virginia Campus

[3]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Hardy M. Cook <
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Date:           Monday, August 10, 1998
Subject:        CD-ROMs

>The BBC-HarperCollins CD Roms are available for R&J, Macbeth, MSND, and
>(it seems) Hamlet. The cheap versions do not include a section on
>Shakespeare's Theatre or a book but they are very cheap and great fun
>if rather simple with their character-outlines, plot-summaries,
>critics-talking, actors-talking sound bites and video snippets.

>An Sonjae, Sogang University, Seoul

Are the BBC-HarperCollins CD-ROMs only available to those who adopt the
Bevington edition or can they be purchased on their own?  If so, from
where?
 

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