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Home :: Archive :: 1998 :: August ::
Re: New York CYMBELINE
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 9.0761  Friday, 14 August 1998.

[1]     From:   Carl Fortunato <
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        Date:   Thursday, 13 Aug 1998 09:48:17 EDT
        Subj:   Re: SHK 9.0756  Re: New York CYMBELINE

[2]     From:   Fran Teague <
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        Date:   Thursday, 13 Aug 1998 10:54:48 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 9.0756  Re: New York CYMBELINE

[3]     From:   Geralyn Horton <
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        Date:   Thursday, 13 Aug 1998 11:00:06 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 9.0756  Re: New York CYMBELINE

[4]     From:   Diane Grecco <
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        Date:   Thursday, 13 Aug 1998 12:09:18 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 9.0752  Re: New York CYMBELINE

[5]     From:   Dana Spradley <
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        Date:   Friday, 14 Aug 1998 09:16:01 -0700 (PDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 9.0752  Re: New York CYMBELINE


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Carl Fortunato <
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Date:           Thursday, 13 Aug 1998 09:48:17 EDT
Subject: 9.0756  Re: New York CYMBELINE
Comment:        Re: SHK 9.0756  Re: New York CYMBELINE

>Good luck getting tickets; we got ours through friends in the
>production.  I don't know this year's method of distributing the grace
>of free tix.

It's not hard to get tickets.  They pass them out at 1:00 pm, and if you
show up at 10, you should get a good seat.  This sounds like a long
time, but sitting in the park and reading a book for 3 hours is actually
a rather pleasant chore.

[2]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Fran Teague <
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Date:           Thursday, 13 Aug 1998 10:54:48 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: 9.0756  Re: New York CYMBELINE
Comment:        Re: SHK 9.0756  Re: New York CYMBELINE

The remarks on CYMBELINE in New York leads me to remind those who are in
driving distance of Atlanta that the Atlanta Shakespeare Tavern is doing
a nice production of PERICLES, uncut. For information phone
404-874-5299.  Meanwhile across town the other Shakespeare company,
Georgia Shakespeare Festival, is doing a first-rate MEASURE for MEASURE:
it's one of the smartest and most interesting productions of this play
that I've ever seen. The GSF phone is 404-504-3400. Y'all come.

[3]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Geralyn Horton <
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Date:           Thursday, 13 Aug 1998 11:00:06 -0400
Subject: 9.0756  Re: New York CYMBELINE
Comment:        Re: SHK 9.0756  Re: New York CYMBELINE

Almost 30 years ago I had the great good fortune to see two wonderful
productions of CYMBELINE within a month of each other: the NYSF at the
Delacourt, and one at Stratford, Ont.  They were very different, partly
because of directorial conception, but mostly because of the performance
conditions of their respective theatres.  I rather preferred the
Stratford one, which was traditionally costumed, unamplified and staged
presentationally, with huge beautiful voices propelling the poetry
between characters on distant diagonals, usually speaking as if at least
as conscious of their public roles and social positions as of the degree
of intimacy between them.  The big scenes, and Jupiter on his eagle,
were thrilling.  The NYSF was electronically amplified, and consequently
in some ways more naturalistic. People stood next to the characters they
were speaking to, and addressed them personally.  But it was also more
expressionistic-the contending armies were in someting like Big Bird
costumes.  The intimate scenes, played at a near-whisper, were very
moving. Both productions made a good case for the play.  Two cases, in
fact: almost two separate plays, one about right rule and loyalty, one
about love and faith. The size, sweep and variety to be found in the
play bowled me over.

G.L.Horton <http://www.tiac.net/users/ghorton>

[4]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Diane Grecco <
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Date:           Thursday, 13 Aug 1998 12:09:18 -0400
Subject: 9.0752  Re: New York CYMBELINE
Comment:        Re: SHK 9.0752  Re: New York CYMBELINE

> It bothered my wife that the actress that played Imogen
> was slightly pregnant, but I didn't even notice until she pointed it
> out.

As John Mahon mentioned, we saw CYMBELINE this past Thursday, and we all
enjoyed it.  We were wondering if Imogen was supposed to be pregnant
(that was how it was played on stage, because at one point, Cloten
speaks to her growing stomach), or if the actress herself was pregnant
and the actors were manipulating the dialogue to reflect her pregnant
state.  I don't think we ever came to an agreement about it, either.

Diane Grecco
Editorial Assistant
The Shakespeare Newsletter
Iona College

[5]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Dana Spradley <
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Date:           Friday, 14 Aug 1998 09:16:01 -0700 (PDT)
Subject: 9.0752  Re: New York CYMBELINE
Comment:        Re: SHK 9.0752  Re: New York CYMBELINE

Is Andrei Serban the guy who directed an amazing 12th Night at the ART
in Cambridge, MA, in 1990 or so? If so, glad to hear he's still going
strong, and has tackled another of my favorite plays. The guy does
wonderful stuff: scenically lush and inventive, yet amazingly close to
the text.

And he doesn't labor under the delusion that he should cut things short.
The 12th Night, as I recall, was well over 3 hours and slowly paced to
bring out every nuance of the text, yet sustained interest over that
longer span better than most "punched up" productions do over a shorter.

Just wish I were still on the East coast! But since I'm not, can anyone
answer a question for my reflecting my own interests in the play - was
there any suggestion of political overtones in the production, pointing
either to Shakespeare's contemporary Jacobean context and the Union
controversy, or to modern day equivalents? I doubt it, since even if
they were operative in 17th century productions, they'd be almost
impossible to reproduce today with any success. But just thought I'd
check.
 

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