Make a Donation

Consider making a donation to support SHAKSPER.

Subscribe to Our Feeds

Current Postings RSS

Announcements RSS

Home :: Archive :: 1998 :: August ::
CD; Children; Globe; KJV; Oregon; MND
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 9.0776  Friday, 21 August 1998.

[1]     From:   Susan Brock <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Monday, 17 Aug 1998 16:17:46 +0100
        Subj:   Re: SHK 9.0747  Re: Prospero; KJV; CD-ROMs

[2]     From:   John Velz <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Sunday, 16 Aug 1998 20:22:31 -0500
        Subj:   helping kids love Sh.

[3]     From:   Dale Lyles <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Sunday, 16 Aug 1998 17:39:28 EDT
        Subj:   Re: SHK 9.0741  Re: New Globe

[4]     From:   Stephanie Hughes <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Sundat, 16 Aug 1998 15:21:22 -0700
        Subj:   Re: SHK 9.0768  Re: KJV

[5]     From:   Matthew Bibb <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Monday, 17 Aug 98 12:36:39 -0800
        Subj:   Oregon Shakespeare Festival

[6]     From:   Stephen N. Matsuba <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Sunday, 16 Aug 1998 23:01:57 -0400
        Subj:   Shakespeare on the Web Article


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Susan Brock <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Monday, 17 Aug 1998 16:17:46 +0100
Subject: 9.0747  Re: Prospero; KJV; CD-ROMs
Comment:        Re: SHK 9.0747  Re: Prospero; KJV; CD-ROMs

>>The BBC-HarperCollins CD Roms are available for R&J, Macbeth, MSND, and
>>(it seems) Hamlet. The cheap versions do not include a section on
>>Shakespeare's Theatre or a book but they are very cheap and great fun
>>if rather simple with their character-outlines, plot-summaries,
>>critics-talking, actors-talking sound bites and video snippets.
>
>>An Sonjae, Sogang University, Seoul
>
>Are the BBC-HarperCollins CD-ROMs only available to those who adopt the
>Bevington edition or can they be purchased on their own?  If so, from
>where?

The BBC-Harper Collins CD Roms can be purchased by mail from:

The Shakespeare Bookshop
Henley St.
Stratford-upon-Avon
CV37 6QW
UK
Tel +44 (0)1789 292176  Fax +44 (0)1789 296083
ALL PROFITS FROM SALES SUPPORT SHAKESPEARE STUDIES.

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           John Velz <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Sunday, 16 Aug 1998 20:22:31 -0500
Subject:        helping kids love Sh.

When we were living in Germany 12 yrs ago, and the girls, then 15 and
12, were in Gymnasium wallowing in German, they had such a  hunger for
their own language that they jumped at my wife's suggestion that we four
form a club called the Eberts Klinge Shakespeare Lesens Verein.  One act
of a romantic comedy each night after supper.  We got through a play
every week.  The younger one stumbled a lot at first but became a very
good reader time we came back to U.S.  You can imagine the pleasure her
demure sister took in playing all those witty and poetic ladies of the
comedies.My wife and I played all the bit parts along with the youngest,
who enjoyed anything she was assigned.  We still think of it as one of
the best things we ever did with the kids.  We still do playreadings
(always Shak. these days) and when the girls are in town they get into
the spirit of it just as they did in Wuerzburg in 1986.  Earlier, in the
late 'seventies, I was teaching in the south of France and they were in
French schools.  Then I read *Watership Down* and the whole of *The Lord
of the Rings* to them a chapter or so a night.  They caught fire and
have read several copies of the two books to pieces since.  I remember
being read to  by my elocutionist mother at a very young age; in this
case *The Wind in the Willows*  To this day it ranks high on my list of
all-time favorite books.

So read aloud to them and let them "read aloud" *with* you and a few
others.

All best to you; whatever you do with them it is worth the effort.
About very young children:  when the younger one was four my wife took
her to the dress rehearsal of *Measure for Measure* which I was
dramaturging at a Sh. festival.  She sat without moving throughout the
play completely moved by it, though she had no idea of the moral issues
in the action.  The emotions just wowed her.  Never too young.

Cheers!    John Velz

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Dale Lyles <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Sunday, 16 Aug 1998 17:39:28 EDT
Subject: 9.0741  Re: New Globe
Comment:        Re: SHK 9.0741  Re: New Globe

>It can't be long before
>the Queen officially designates it a symbol of our national heritage.

Along with you, dear Terence, surely...

Dale Lyles
Newnan Community Theatre Company
Newnan, GA (USA)

[4]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Stephanie Hughes <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Sundat, 16 Aug 1998 15:21:22 -0700
Subject: 9.0768  Re: KJV
Comment:        Re: SHK 9.0768  Re: KJV

> > As someone mentioned on this thread, many of the
> > translations are not precise. Was that because the translator didn't
> > know his Greek? I don't think so.
>
> Oh, Stephanie, really!  I made it quite clear.

I wasn't arguing with your statement, simply amplifying it.

> The KJV was translated
> with the best knowledge at that time.  It was very faithful to the
> original texts, given their state of knowledge.  Your fanciful and
> undocumented musings about giving into the poets does these men a
> disservice.

Documented?  How is it necessary to document what should be obvious to
anyone who studies this period, that an education, and the work of
educators and scholars, consisted to a far greater extent (to put it
mildly) of reading and translating directly from Greek and Latin, the
important works of ancient times. The Classics departments of our
schools today are tiny vestigial remains of what was at one time the
core of all higher learning.

> 400 years later we know more and therefore translate differently.

What's to know more about? The ancient language hasn't changed. Opinions
and fads come and go, repeating themselves in cycles. Anyone who studies
Greek can see that the KJV isn't exact. It doesn't take four hundred
years of scholarship, just a couple of semesters. I guess it's possible
that someone who has no ear for poetry would fail to grasp that euphony
was as important to the translators as meaning (just as it so obviously
was to those that wrote the originals), but far be it from me to suggest
that anyone on this list might suffer from such a grievous fault.

> When
> Hebrew, Greek, and Aramayic scholars translate, they go for a faithful
> rendering.  Readability comes second, poetry comes last.  They did it
> then, they do it now.

I agree that they do it now. I don't agree for a minute that they did it
then.

I agree it is unfortunate that some people -

> > judge our forbears by ourselves.
>
> but if I understand your post, that is exactly what you are doing.

That's a big if.

Cheers,
Stephanie

[5]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Matthew Bibb <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Monday, 17 Aug 98 12:36:39 -0800
Subject:        Oregon Shakespeare Festival

List,

Just got back from a week at the Oregon Shakespeare Festival in Ashland,
and I had some comments and questions for all of you.

My friends and I were surprisingly unimpressed by the caliber of acting
talent we saw. The physical productions of *Comedy of Errors* and *1
Henry IV* were spectacular: great sets, lights, costumes, but it seemed
as if the directors spent far more time on those aspects (as well as on
elaborate concepts) than on character development or acting. The
question is a two-parter: Did anyone else on-list who saw these shows
share my groups opinions? And if so, did we just pick a bum year to go,
or is every year slightly mediocre?

     Matt Bibb
     Lost Dog Productions

P.S. The one show we really loved was *Cymbeline*, which was fantastic.
We didn't get in to see *Midsummer* or, tragically, *Measure*.

[6]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Stephen N. Matsuba <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Sunday, 16 Aug 1998 23:01:57 -0400
Subject:        Shakespeare on the Web Article

The August 1998 issue of Computer Graphics World has a feature article
by Donna Coco: "A Web Developer's Dream: A Live VRML Production of
Shakespeare's A Midsummer Night's Dream Makes Internet History."  The
article looks at the VRML Dream project and examines some of the
technical issues.

Regards,
Stephen Matsuba
 

Other Messages In This Thread

©2011 Hardy Cook. All rights reserved.