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Home :: Archive :: 1998 :: July ::
Questions, Questions, Questions
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 9.0631  Wednesday, 8 July 1998.

[1]     From:   Drew Whitehead <
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        Date:   Wed, 8 Jul 1998 10:57:40 +1000 (GMT+1000)
        Subj:   Re: Two Questions

[2]     From:   Jan Stirm <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 7 Jul 1998 21:49:45 -0500
        Subj:   Othello Questions


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Drew Whitehead <
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Date:           Wed, 8 Jul 1998 10:57:40 +1000 (GMT+1000)
Subject:        Re: Two Questions

I have two questions that I would like to pose to the list.

1/ In way of response to the "As You Like It Hike", I recently viewed a
production of King John which changed its local five time during the
performance as a way of emphasising the difference in the locations of
France and England.  The final change was to the bedside death of the
King.  Personally I find that this sort of performance tends to inhibit
the flow of the performance and that the benefits gained by the new
locations are undercut by the protracted performance.  I prefer my
Shakespeare to sweep me along from beginning to end (without intervals)
rather than to be a broken up series of segments, with long pauses while
we wait for the stragglers.  How do others feel about this?

2/ Secondly, and more importantly, how does one get children interested
in reading Shakespeare.  I have three children, the eldest (Miranda) is
nearly seven so they are perhaps still a little too young, however I
have noticed that from time to time members of the list have spoken of
children as young as ten reading and seeing Shakespeare.  I know with
myself that I loathed Shakespeare in high school, a fact which I now put
down to the appalling way it was taught to me.  Therefore I am eager to
"get it right" for my own children.  I would be grateful for any
suggestions.

Drew Whitehead.

[2]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Jan Stirm <
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Date:           Tuesday, 7 Jul 1998 21:49:45 -0500
Subject:        Othello Questions

Dear Colleagues,

I'm beginning to plan my senior undergraduate seminar next year.  I'm
planing to use Othello as a central text through which to explore
theoretical and social history issues (blackness, family crime), textual
issues, and so forth, all, I hope, coming more or less "naturally" out
of the play.  I'm trying to include some non-dramatic early modern
texts, some criticism, and when possible, another early modern (or not)
dramatic text that speaks to the same issues in different ways.

My question is about Othello's seizure.  Can anyone suggest some helpful
background reading for me and my students on how seizures (epilepsy??)
were "read" or understood popularly and in medical treatises?  And does
anyone know another play that features a character with a seizure?

(I'd also be happy for other suggestions of related texts, early modern
or critical.)

Thanks, Jan Stirm

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