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Home :: Archive :: 1998 :: July ::
Re: MND
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 9.0705  Thursday, 30 July 1998.

[1]     From:   Sean Lawrence <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 29 Jul 1998 10:51:56 -0700
        Subj:   Re: SHK 9.0701  Q: MND

[2]     From:   Ed Taft <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 29 Jul 1998 14:09:52 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   MND

[3]     From:   Stephanie Hughes <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 29 Jul 1998 19:06:04 -0700
        Subj:   Re: SHK 9.0701  Q: MND

[4]     From:   Peter Holland <
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        Date:   Thursday, 30 Jul 1998 11:48:25 GMT
        Subj:   Re: SHK 9.0701  Q: MND

[5]     From:   Fran Teague <
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        Date:   Thursday, 30 Jul 1998 11:05:26 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 9.0701 Q: MND

[6]     From:   Hardy M. Cook <
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        Date:   Thursday, July 30, 1998
        Subj:   Re: MND


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Sean Lawrence <
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Date:           Wednesday, 29 Jul 1998 10:51:56 -0700
Subject: 9.0701  Q: MND
Comment:        Re: SHK 9.0701  Q: MND

> Does anybody know of a play which tackles similar subject matter as MND
> which appeared around the time MND first appeared?  Is it singular in
> what it tackles or were there others like it?  I have searched but seem
> to think that the play may be on its own.  Is this odd considering the
> amount of repetition that occurred in the repertories of the main London
> companies?
>
> Scott Crozier

I don't know of anything similar to MND at its time, but it does seem to
have spawned a series of derivatives.  There's a terrible late
sixteenth-century novel, in black letter in the Early Modern English
books collection of microfilms, called Theseus and Titana.  The author,
though, seems to have borrowed almost nothing except names and location.

There's also something from the mid-17th century called "Orlando, King
of the Faeries", or something like that.

Cheers,
Sean.

[2]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Ed Taft <
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Date:           Wednesday, 29 Jul 1998 14:09:52 -0500 (EST)
Subject:        MND

Scott Crozier asks if there are other plays similar to MND that appeared
at around the same time. John Lyly's *Gallathea* (1588?) and *Endymion,
or the Man in the Moon* (1588?) and George Peele's *The Old Wive's Tale*
(1591?) come to mind. They share with MND fantastic characters, romantic
settings, an emphasis on madness and the forest, madness and love as
similar (Peele), courtly compliments, etc. Peele, especially, seems to
have been a major influence on Shakespeare's comedies and on MND in
particular. The best article on Peele's *OWT* is still Gwenan Jones,
"The Intention of Peele's *Old Wives Tale*,* *Aberystwyth Studies,
1925,* 79-93.

--Ed Taft

[3]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Stephanie Hughes <
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Date:           Wednesday, 29 Jul 1998 19:06:04 -0700
Subject: 9.0701  Q: MND
Comment:        Re: SHK 9.0701  Q: MND

"James IV", attributed to Robert Greene, written sometime in the late
1580s or early 90s, has many elements similar to those in MSND. It also
has a last act that's almost identical to the last act of AYLI. Theseus
and Hippolyta appear in much the same roles that they play in MSND in
"Two Noble Kinsmen" attributed to Shakespeare and Fletcher. Although
orthodox dating puts it late, it seems clear to me from the style to be
the same period as James IV. (If Fletcher was involved, it was only to
modernize it.) Anyway, you might want to take a look at these two plays.

Stephanie Hughes

[4]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Peter Holland <
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Date:           Thursday, 30 Jul 1998 11:48:25 GMT
Subject: 9.0701  Q: MND
Comment:        Re: SHK 9.0701  Q: MND

Try Munday's *John a Kent and John a Cumber* which may be 1590 or  1596
(the date on the MS is unclear).

[5]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Fran Teague <
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Date:           Thursday, 30 Jul 1998 11:05:26 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: 9.0701 Q: MND
Comment:        Re: SHK 9.0701 Q: MND

There is a potential analogue to MND in Calderon's La vida es sueno (a
tilde should go over that "n" but my computer is as Anglo-centric as can
be). While it's tempting to believe that Sh knew the work of the Golden
Age Spanish dramatists, chances are slim to none, I'm told.

Fran Teague
New e-mail address: 
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[6]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Hardy M. Cook <
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Date:           Thursday, July 30, 1998
Subject:        Re: MND

*Romeo and Juliet*
 

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