1998

Postings from HUMANIST

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 9.0629  Wednesday, 8 July 1998.

From:           Hardy M. Cook <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, July 8, 1998
Subject:        Postings from HUMANIST


Dear SHAKSPEReans,

I thought the following two postings from HUMANIST might be of interest
to some SHAKSPEReans.

As a postscript, Ken Steele modeled SHAKSPER on HUMANIST when he founded
SHAKSPER in 1990 at the University of Toronto.


[1]**********************
              Humanist Discussion Group, Vol. 12, No. 117.
      Centre for Computing in the Humanities, King's College London
              <http://www.princeton.edu/~mccarty/humanist/>
             <http://www.kcl.ac.uk/humanities/cch/humanist/>

        Date: Mon, 6 Jul 1998 17:20:52 +1000 (GMT+1000)
        From: Dr Chris Tiffin <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Subject: CALL FOR PAPERS

        ***************************************************************

                                CALL    FOR    PAPERS

******************************************************************


        BIBLIOGRAPHICAL  SOCIETY  OF  AUSTRALIA  AND NEW  ZEALAND


                                Annual Conference

                                Brisbane, Australia

                                8-10 July 1999


            ***      "Bibliography, Mystery, and Detection"      ****


Offers of papers (30 minutes' duration) are invited on:

        * investigative techniques in physical bibliography

        * attribution, authentication and textual criticism

        * unsolved bibliographical conundrums

        * anatomising the electronic text

        * books and bibliography in detective and crime fiction


The conference will be held at the Queensland State Library, South Bank,
Brisbane, Australia.


Offers of papers (with 300-word abstracts) should be directed by 31
January 1999 to: Dr Chris Tiffin, Department of English, University of
Queensland,
Australia 4072.
Phone:  +61 7  3365 2172
Fax:  +61 7 3365 2799
Email:  This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Web Page http://www.uq.edu.au/~enctiffi/bsanz.htm


[2]***********************
              Humanist Discussion Group, Vol. 12, No. 118.
      Centre for Computing in the Humanities, King's College London
              <http://www.princeton.edu/~mccarty/humanist/>
             <http://www.kcl.ac.uk/humanities/cch/humanist/>

  [1]   From:    Michael Arnush <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>        (44)
        Subject: [electronic publication]

[The following taken from correspondence of the advisory board of Stoa,
<http://www.stoa.org/>, quoting an item in the Chronicle of Higher
Education (U.S.). Further comments below.]

ACADEMICS PUSH FOR ONLINE PUBLISHING

A small group of influential academics is pushing to introduce online
peer review and publishing of scholarly works, as an alternative source
of information to high-price journals.  Some journals, particularly in
science and technology, can cost as much as $15,000 a year.  The group,
which includes academic officers from the University of Rochester,
Columbia University and the California Institute of Technology, wants
professors to publish online rather than in print, and wants
universities to recognize online posting as "publishing" for the
purposes of career advancement decisions.  "We are calling for neither a
lessening of the importance of research in the criteria for promotion
and tenure, nor a turning away from peer review," says a paper produced
by the Association of American Universities and the Association of
Research Libraries.. "What we seek is an alternate means of achieving
those ends."  Under the proposed plan the papers, once posted online,
would be peer-reviewed by a panel of experts, just as is now the case
with print-published papers. The panels, which would be established by
scholarly groups, would give each article a grade or a stamp of
approval.  The response so far from some disciplinary groups has been
lukewarm.

(Chronicle of Higher Education 26 Jun 98)

[Perhaps if these lukewarm disciplinary groups were to have a grasp of
the financial impediments to scholarship in some parts of the world,
both compassion and self-interest would heat them up. The loss of human
talent, missing because neither individuals nor their libraries can
afford the publications on paper, we simply cannot afford. Or so it
seems to me. Comments welcome. Yours from the ALLC/ACH in Debrecen,
Hungary, WM]

Re: Shrew Matrimony Question

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 9.0628  Wednesday, 8 July 1998.

[1]     From:   Tanya Gough <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 7 Jul 1998 10:47:28 -0400
        Subj:   Re: Taming

[2]     From:   Stuart Manger <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 7 Jul 1998 17:58:25 +0100
        Subj:   SHK 9.0627 Q: Shrew

[3]     From:   David Evett <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 07 Jul 1998 13:36:49 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 9.0627  Q: Shrew

[4]     From:   Sean Lawrence <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 08 Jul 1998 01:19:54 -0700
        Subj:   Re: SHK 9.0627  Q: Shrew


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Tanya Gough <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 7 Jul 1998 10:47:28 -0400
Subject:        Re: Taming

Dear Jad,

The Renaissance wedding was actually comprised of three parts: the
banns, which placed the future marriage into the public sphere, the
ceremony, which solidifies the bond in the eyes of God, and the
consummation, which reinforces the bond between the two individuals.
Couples are forever missing out on one or more aspects of the "accepted"
marriage tradition, and your sister is right to note that there is
definitely something *wrong* with Petrucho and Kate.  A wedding accepted
by the public and the church, but not by both individuals is clearly a
farce, much as Romeo and Juliet, who have mutual consent and religious
approval, become tragic figures when they are unable to reconcile their
bond in society.

Whether, and how, Kate and Petruchio consummate their marriage may be a
directorial choice.  I'd like to think that Petruchio is a boor, but not
such an animal that he would stoop to rape.  Yet the opportunity
certainly is there.  When he keeps her "up all night" on their wedding
night, does he force himself on her or is he just throwing pillows
around?  In keeping with the "happy ending" version, most modern
productions gloss over that part and imply that they get together,
consentually, at the end.  Has anyone ever done a version of Shrew where
Petruchio literally beats, rapes and starves Kate into submission?  I
have heard of a feminist version where Kate delivers her final "duties
of the wife" speech with such sincerity that all at the table recoiled
in horror at the transformation.

But to get back to Jad's question, the implications of *not*
consummating the marriage would have reinforced the unnatural bond
between them, largely to comic effect I should think.

Tanya

[2]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Stuart Manger <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 7 Jul 1998 17:58:25 +0100
Subject: Q: Shrew
Comment:        SHK 9.0627 Q: Shrew

To the best of my knowledge, it was not axiomatic that marriage was
followed by consummation, particularly in the case of very young brides
/ grooms in 'marriages of convenience' situations. Now how young is I
presume is open to question. Juliet (approx. 14 at projected marriage
time) clearly does expect consummation. So, interesting problem?

[3]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           David Evett <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 07 Jul 1998 13:36:49 -0400
Subject: 9.0627  Q: Shrew
Comment:        Re: SHK 9.0627  Q: Shrew

In response to Jad Juwaik's query about Shrew: the consensus among
critics is, indeed, that the marriage has not yet been consummated at
the end of the play, but will be soon ("Come, Kate, we'll to bed"),
along with those of Lucentio and Bianca and Hortensio and the Widow.  To
be sure, one way to construe Petruchio's statements at the end of 4.1
about not having let Katherine sleep is that he has kept her awake by
strenuous and repeated insistence on his conjugal rights.  But the
accompanying talk about throwing the bedclothes about and how he will
"rail and brawl" does not sound very sexy.

David Evett

[4]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Sean Lawrence <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 08 Jul 1998 01:19:54 -0700
Subject: 9.0627  Q: Shrew
Comment:        Re: SHK 9.0627  Q: Shrew

Shrew seems to play rather fast and loose with a lot of doctrines of
matrimony at the time.  The homily on the subject decries the fact that
many husbands are

...farre behinde the wisedome of this man [i.e., Socrates, famously
patient with his wife], my counsell is, that first and before all
things, a man doe his best endeuour to get him a good wife, endued with
all honestie and vertue: But if it so chaunce that he is deceiued, that
hee hath chosen such a wife as is neither good nor tolerable, then let
the husband follow this Philosopher, and let him instruct his wife in
euery condition, and neuer lay these matters to sight.

[On-line at
http://utl2.library.utoronto.ca/utel/ret/homilies/bk2hom18.html
]

If we take the homily as indicative of received doctrine on the matter,
Petruchio is doing the opposite of what he ought.

An interesting essay in EMLS addresses some of Petruchio's shortcomings
as a spouse, not only from our twentieth-century standpoint, but also
from an Elizabethan standpoint:

    http://www.humanities.ualberta.ca/emls/04-1/heanshak.html

The upshot of all this is, it seems, that a large number of current
doctrines about matrimony just don't seem to apply to the world of the
play.  One might say that it's a carnivalesque world, one turned on its
head:  the marriage chamber is the scene of discord not of concord, and
of deferral rather than consummation.

Cheers,
Sean.

Re: R2; Sh. in London and Stratford, Ontario

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 9.0626  Tuesday, 7 July 1998.

[1]     From:   Jean Klene <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 6 Jul 1998 10:07:05 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 9.0615 Re: Richard II Stage History

[2]     From:   Renie Pickman-Thoon <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 6 Jul 1998 11:07:36 -0700
        Subj:   Re: Shakespeare in London

[3]     From:   Steve Urkowitz <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 6 Jul 1998 18:37:08 EDT
        Subj:   Stratford Ontario: road food en route


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Jean Klene <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 6 Jul 1998 10:07:05 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 9.0615 Re: Richard II Stage History
Comment:        Re: SHK 9.0615 Re: Richard II Stage History

Stanley Wells wrote a short paperback, "Royal Shakespeare: Four major
productions at Stratford-upon-Avon," which includes a discussion of the
John Barton "Richard II," 1973-74, pp. 64-80, with Richard Pasco and Ian
Richardson alternating the roles of Richard and Bolingbroke.  Wells also
mentions articles "Designing a Shakespeare Play: 'Richard II,' in
"Shakespeare Jahrbook" (West / 1974), pp. 111-120; and "Dramatic
Representation in Shakespeare's 'Richard II,' "Sydney Studies in English
I (1975-6), pp. 32-45.

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Renie Pickman-Thoon <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 6 Jul 1998 11:07:36 -0700
Subject:        Re: Shakespeare in London

Jeannette Webber wrote:

>If you'll be in London before July 25, you'll have the opportunity to
>see Twelfth Night at the Young Vic <snip>

I will be in the London area from August 3-August 9.  What Shakespeare
performances should I not miss (or should I avoid!).  I'm scheduled to
see Twelfth Night in Stratford.

Thanks.
Cheers,
Renie

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Steve Urkowitz <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 6 Jul 1998 18:37:08 EDT
Subject:        Stratford Ontario: road food en route

Traveling with some serious eaters, we stopped at Chon-Buri's Spicy Thai
restaurant, 208 Church Street, in St. Catharines Ontario. (905 687-THAI,
and This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.).  For pilgrims from the eastern US on the way to
Stratford in Canada, it's only a few minutes off the highway, and the
food was wonderful, memorable, some of the best of a lifetime of
dedicated eating.  The Ontario Travel Centre kiosk made the
recommendation, phoned ahead for reservations, gave us a map and
detailed directions.

Any suggestions about food near Shakespearean places in Southwark and
Stratford in England?

Steve Not-by-bread-alone-owitz  (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)

Q: Shrew

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 9.0627  Tuesday, 7 July 1998.

From:           Jad Duwaik <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 6 Jul 1998 10:48:31 -0600
Subject:        Taming of the Shrew

My 14yr old sister came up with a question that I couldn't answer. So
hopefully someone can help me protect my reputation as the Shakespeare
fanatic in the family:

During the Renaissance period, the marriage ceremony was consummated by
the act of sex between the husband and wife, correct? If this is
correct, then was the marriage between Kate and Petruchio ever
consummated? It wasn't on the evening of ceremony, was it? What would be
the implication of not consummating a marriage that evening?

Any thoughts?

Jad

Q: Poison

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 9.0625  Tuesday, 7 July 1998.

From:           Stephanie Cowell <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 6 Jul 1998 10:19:23 -0500
Subject:        Poison

Can anyone suggest specifically what poison Romeo and Juliet might have
used? Thanks!

Stephanie Cowell

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