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Home :: Archive :: 1998 :: June ::
Re: Contemporary Uses of Shakespearean Materials
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 9.0546  Friday, 12 June 1998.

[1]     From:   Tanya Gough <
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        Date:   Thursday, 11 Jun 1998 11:23:29 -0400
        Subj:   Re: Contemporary Uses of Shakespearean Materials

[2]     From:   Richard Nathan <
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        Date:   Thursday, 11 Jun 1998 15:27:27 +0000
        Subj:   Re: Contemporary Uses of Shakespearean Materials

[3]     From:   Richard A Burt <
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        Date:   Thursday, 11 Jun 1998 12:35:46 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   Re: Contemporary Uses of Shakespearean Materials

[4]     From:   Syd Kasten <
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        Date:   Thursday, 11 Jun 1998 22:31:52 +0300 (IDT)
        Subj:   Re: Contemporary Uses of Shakespearean Materials

[5]     From:   Jeannette Webber <
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        Date:   Thursday, 11 Jun 1998 23:44:57 EDT
        Subj:   Re: Contemporary Uses of Shakespearean Materials


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Tanya Gough <
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Date:           Thursday, 11 Jun 1998 11:23:29 -0400
Subject: 9.0542  Re: Contemporary Uses of Shakespearean
Comment:        Re: SHK 9.0542  Re: Contemporary Uses of Shakespearean
Materials

Thanks, Syd Kasten, for the data on Kaurismaki's films - my problem has
been in tracking them down on video.  Kaurismaki, for those of you who
might not know, is the director responsible for the very delightful, but
extremely weird "Leningrad Cowboys" movies.  If anyone knows of or has
seen the Hamlet or Macbeth on NTSC (North American compatible) video,
please, please let me know.

We may be on the other side of the world, Syd, but we're not entirely
out of the loop.

A few other titles which have been missed: Akira Kurosawa's "The Bad
Sleep Well," which has just come back into print, and the Japanese
animation cartoon "Ranma and Juliet," which we expect to have in stock
next week.

You can also consult our website for information of this nature - I've
tried to indicate the Shakespearean content in most of our entries.
Here's the address (purely for research purposes, you understand):
http://www.cyg.net/~yorick

Tanya Gough
Poor Yorick

[2]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Richard Nathan <
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Date:           Thursday, 11 Jun 1998 15:27:27 +0000
Subject: 9.0542  Re: Contemporary Uses of Shakespearean
Comment:        Re: SHK 9.0542  Re: Contemporary Uses of Shakespearean
Materials

I hope I may be forgiven for sending in another note about my own
contemporary use of Shakespearean material.  I'm referring to my
re-writing Shakespeare's tragedies for such comedians as Groucho Marx,
W.C. Fields, and Abbott and Costello.

My Hamlet parody was performed at Pasadena City College, where it was
very well received.  Hamlet is Groucho, the Ghost is Harpo, Horatio is
Chico, Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are Laruel and Hardy, and the
traveling players are the Three Stooges.  The script can be found on the
internet at http://www.dramex.org/plays/scripts/elsinore.txt

The King Lear parody has W.C. Fields as Lear, Groucho as the Fool,
Gracie Allen as Cordelia, Charlie McCarthy as Edmond, and Mortimer Snerd
as Edgar.  The Macbeth character has Lou Costello as Macbeth.  Lady
Macbeth starts out as a woman, but when she asks the spirits that tend
on mortal thoughts to unsex her, she turns into Bud Abbott.  Jerry Lewis
is Duncan, and Joe Besser is Malcolm.  These scripts are not available
on the internet, but I send them by e-mail to anyone who requests them.

I'm currently trying to find a publisher for all three scripts.  If I
can't get them published, I'll put them all up on the internet.

[3]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Richard A Burt <
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Date:           Thursday, 11 Jun 1998 12:35:46 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: 9.0542  Re: Contemporary Uses of Shakespearean
Comment:        Re: SHK 9.0542  Re: Contemporary Uses of Shakespearean
Materials

There all all kinds of adaptations discussed by the contributors to
_Shakespeare, The Movie_ (Routledge, 1997), Lynda E. Boose and Richard
Burt, eds.

[4]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Syd Kasten <
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Date:           Thursday, 11 Jun 1998 22:31:52 +0300 (IDT)
Subject: 9.0533 Re: Contemporary Uses of Shakespearean
Comment:        Re: SHK 9.0533 Re: Contemporary Uses of Shakespearean
Materials

Sometime in the sixties I read "The Green Man", a novelization by Henry
Treece of  Hamlet.

Best wishes,
Syd Kasten

[5]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Jeannette Webber <
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Date:           Thursday, 11 Jun 1998 23:44:57 EDT
Subject: 9.0538  Re: Contemporary Uses of Shakespearean
Comment:        Re: SHK 9.0538  Re: Contemporary Uses of Shakespearean
Materials

There's Robertson Davies' novel "Tempest Tost."
 

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