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Home :: Archive :: 1998 :: June ::
Re: Iconography
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 9.0560  Tuesday, 16 June 1998.

[1]     From:   Katherine Hardman <
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        Date:   Monday, 15 Jun 1998 12:41:37 EDT
        Subj:   Re: SHK 9.0557  Iconography

[2]     From:   Andrew Murphy <
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        Date:   Monday, 15 Jun 1998 17:45:58 +0100
        Subj:   Re: SHK 9.0557  Iconography

[3]     From:   Markus Marti <
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        Date:   Monday, 15 Jun 1998 22:57:21 +0000
        Subj:   Re: SHK 9.0557  Iconography

[4]     From:   Patricia Cooke <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 16 Jun 1998 11:28:48 +1200
        Subj:   Re: SHK 9.0557  Iconography

[5]     From:   Peter Groves <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 16 Jun 1998 09:58:00 +1000
        Subj:   Re: SHK 9.0557  Iconography


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Katherine Hardman <
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Date:           Monday, 15 Jun 1998 12:41:37 EDT
Subject: 9.0557  Iconography
Comment:        Re: SHK 9.0557  Iconography

Hi,

I know that there are several people that work for the Folger
Shakespeare Library in DC, so maybe they can jump in here. Last summer,
I believe, they put on an excellent exhibit called "Shakespeare's Unruly
Women." It mainly consisted of later 19th century pictorial
representations of some of Shakespeare's women heroines. This was
accompanied by some newspaper articles which discussed the subject of
feminism from the time of the 19th century, so from around the same time
that the pictures were produced.

The mere existence and creation of such an exhibit was something that I
thought that given your statements you might find interesting.

Katherine

[2]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Andrew Murphy <
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Date:           Monday, 15 Jun 1998 17:45:58 +0100
Subject: 9.0557  Iconography
Comment:        Re: SHK 9.0557  Iconography

Ron --

The answer to your question in a way depends on what you mean by
'illustrated'. Rowe's 1709 text had 45 engravings-I don't think any
previous editions had any illustrations, beyond the portrait included in
the C17th folios. The first edition to make a real play of its
illustrations was, as far as I know, Boydell's (1791-1802). It cost an
absolute fortune to produce and the plates were subsequently issued
separately in a single volume. The original paintings were put on
display in a gallery in Pall Mall. By all accounts, the first US
illustrated edition was the 3rd Boston of 1810-12. The C19th was really
the time when illustration came into its own, with important editions by
(among others) Valpy, Knight, Halliwell-Phillipps (limited to 150
copies), the Cowden Clarkes and Staunton. I think the Staunton was
reissued in facsimile sometime in the 1970s.

Hope this is helpful.

Andrew

[3]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Markus Marti <
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Date:           Monday, 15 Jun 1998 22:57:21 +0000
Subject: 9.0557  Iconography
Comment:        Re: SHK 9.0557  Iconography

> Does anyone know of the first illustrated Shakespeare edition or other
> depictions (possibly on posters) of scenes from the Bard?
>
> Ron Ward

The first illustration was Henry Peacham's (?) drawing in pen and ink,
which was found on the Longleat manuscript of  Titus Andronicus, Act I,
depicting  "... Tamora pleadinge for her sonnes going to execution" ,
dated around 1595 - or some time between 1594 and 1596 (cf. Eugene M.
Waith in the Oxford Shakespeare, Oxford UP 1994, p.20ff or Alan Hughes
in the New Cambridge Shakespeare, Cambridge UP 1994,  p. 15ff)

Markus Marti

[4]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Patricia Cooke <
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Date:           Tuesday, 16 Jun 1998 11:28:48 +1200
Subject: 9.0557  Iconography
Comment:        Re: SHK 9.0557  Iconography

>Does anyone know of the first illustrated Shakespeare edition or other
>depictions (possibly on posters) of scenes from the Bard? The subject
>has not come up very frequently, except for a request for Romeo &
>Juliette pictures. Who was the first artist inspired by the Bard? The
>scenes most commonly depicted in each historical period may say
>something about the way different ages relate to particular scenes. For
>example the (these days) controversial scenes discussed recently
>concerning Jews, feminism etc. might be uncommon choices of artists in
>the later 20th century. As far as moving pictures go, Olivier's
>selection of Henry V was certainly strongly driven by the events of the
>day. Cymbeline seems to be very popular among the Celtic enthusiasts of
>today but rarely performed for the ordinary theatre goer. Coriolanus,
>with its implicit lampooning of the democratic process of elections may
>be hard for those keen on the "American way" to swallow. Is it our
>underlying fixations that see the greatest virtues in the most popular
>plays of today? Eg Hamlets excessive introspection. Then again, on this
>newsgroup we usually find 20 or so people who know all about this sort
>of thing, or at least can refer to learned articles on it. I will be
>interested to receive comments.

Hi, Ron.

I'm fascinated by this SHAKSPER list and it's cheering to read the
occasional posting from NZ.  Presumably you've read Gary Taylor's
Re-inventing Shakespeare which covers the contemporary attitudes towards
the plays over the centuries since 1616.  I could lend you my copy if
you haven't.
Pat

[5]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Peter Groves <
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Date:           Tuesday, 16 Jun 1998 09:58:00 +1000
Subject: 9.0557  Iconography
Comment:        Re: SHK 9.0557  Iconography

> Does anyone know of the first illustrated Shakespeare edition or other
> depictions (possibly on posters) of scenes from the Bard? The subject
> has not come up very frequently, except for a request for Romeo &
> Juliette pictures. Who was the first artist inspired by the Bard?

Have a look at <Shakespeare and the Artist> by W. Moelwyn Merchant.
 

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