Make a Donation

Consider making a donation to support SHAKSPER.

Subscribe to Our Feeds

Current Postings RSS

Announcements RSS

Home :: Archive :: 1998 :: June ::
London; Female; Iconography; Birth; Burned Out;
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 9.0573  Thursday, 18 June 1998.

[1]     From:   Virginia Byrne <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Wednesday, 17 Jun 1998 15:31:28 EDT
        Subj:   Re: SHK 9.0566  Q: London Theatre

[2]     From:   C. David Frankel <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Wednesday, 17 Jun 1998 19:34:17 -0400
        Subj:   RE: SHK 9.0552  Re: Female R3

[3]     From:   Syd Kasten <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Wednesday, 17 Jun 1998 23:45:47 +0300 (IDT)
        Subj:   SHK 9.0557  Iconography

[4]     From:   Jasson Minadakis <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Thursday, 18 Jun 1998 09:39:42 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 9.0553 Re: The Birth of Merlin

[5]     From:   Linda Hobbet <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Wednesday, 17 Jun 1998 19:50:55 -0700
        Subj:   Burned out on Shakespeare?

[6]     From:   Carl Fortunato <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Thursday, 18 Jun 1998 11:22:39 EDT
        Subj:   Fundraiser, including The Birth of Merlin


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Virginia Byrne <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Wednesday, 17 Jun 1998 15:31:28 EDT
Subject: 9.0566  Q: London Theatre
Comment:        Re: SHK 9.0566  Q: London Theatre

Regarding London tickets try  Albemarle-London on the
internet...excellent set-up for finding out what's up and ordering
tickets...I have done a lot of business with them this Spring...very
efficient...

How about Cheek and Jowl's MUCH ADO?

[2]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           C. David Frankel <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Wednesday, 17 Jun 1998 19:34:17 -0400
Subject: 9.0552  Re: Female R3
Comment:        RE: SHK 9.0552  Re: Female R3

Not professional, but some years ago (around 1980, I think) the
University of Wisconsin-Madison did a production of _Richard's Lear_,
adapted and directed by Richard Schechner, a kind of conflation of
Richard III and King Lear, with a female graduate student as Lear and a
junior high school male as Richard.

cdf

[3]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Syd Kasten <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Wednesday, 17 Jun 1998 23:45:47 +0300 (IDT)
Subject: Iconography
Comment:        SHK 9.0557  Iconography

Ron Ward wrote:

 >The scenes most commonly depicted in each historical period may say
>something about the way different ages relate to particular scenes

and went on to list a number plays, including Coriolanus, which

>with its implicit lampooning of the democratic process of elections may
>be hard for those keen on the "American way" to swallow.

It has been suggested (elsewhere - I apologize for not citing the
source) that the infrequency of Coriolanus' presentation in our century
is due to its political message. However, I doubt that Shakespeare knew
enough about the American way of democratic elections to lampoon it.  In
"Coriolanus" Shakespeare is  examining, among other things, the class
struggle, which has been as serious a theme for his time as for our
own.  Not half a century would go by before the English would have their
own revolution.

Although the author gives the Roman citizenry an articulate voice with
which to state its concerns, it seems to me that it comes off second
best.  The populus is portrayed as weak and unworthy, a changeable
instrument played and orchestrated by the self serving tribunes.  One
might excuse artists and performers swept up in the socialist wave of
the 20th century for ignoring the play.

Incidentally, last year the Jerusalem Festival offered a presentation of
the play by a company led by Stephen Berkoff.  The setting was in a kind
of 30's, with Berkoff coming on stage as a Mussolini, the citizenry as a
mob of bullyboys, The tribunes as party apparatchiks, wearing
trenchcoats and fedoras and giving us an amusing portrayal of Butthead
and Bevis.  Aufidius's stronghold was the lair of a crime lord of the
period.  The chorus quadrupled as citizenry, army, senate, and the
Volscians.  The only props were a row of chairs in the background used
in the senate and the Aufidian den, and clubs used by the menacing mob.
Just about everything else was virtual: the swords in the battle of
Corioli, the pistols of the Volscians, drawn in fear when Coriolanus
revealed himself to them, and, most impressive and amusing, the
motorcycle driven by the dispatch rider. An unseen and unobtrusive
percussionist underlay the choreographed action.  I found it impressive
and enjoyable.

Best wishes,
Syd Kasten

[4]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Jasson Minadakis <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Thursday, 18 Jun 1998 09:39:42 -0500
Subject: 9.0553 Re: The Birth of Merlin
Comment:        Re: SHK 9.0553 Re: The Birth of Merlin

The Cincinnati Shakespeare Festival's Apocrypha Readings have gone over
very well with the actors and the audiences.  The program this year
included:

Sir Thomas More
Cardenio
Edward III
The Birth of Merlin
Edmund Ironsides

Voting was held at all of the readings at the end of each session after
about a half hour of discussion.  Audience members and actors voted for
one of the following categories:

Entire Text Written by Shakespeare - EDWARD III
Majority Text Written by Shakespeare - CARDENIO, EDMUND?
Partial Text - EDMUND?
Edited Sections - MORE
No Part in Play as Stands - MERLIN

Cardenio and Edward (far and away the best reception for "entire text
written" by Shakespeare) did the best as far as the audience feeling
Shakespeare's hand played a large part.  Edmund was split between A
Majority and Partial.  More was very strong for him writing a portion,
and as posted earlier, no one thought Shakespeare had a part in Merlin.
Be happy to provide more details if anyone is interested.

Jasson Minadakis
Artistic Director
Cincinnati Shakespeare Festival

[5]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Linda Hobbet <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Wednesday, 17 Jun 1998 19:50:55 -0700
Subject:        Burned out on Shakespeare?

Mike Jensen wrote:

>Just when I think I can't bear another AYLI, Shrew, Dream, Othello, or
>other oft' seen play, I attend a production that works in so many ways I am
>enraptured all over again.  Perhaps some really are burnt out on
>Shakespeare.  Then move on.  Like Penelope, I only think I am burnt out.
>Then someone does it right and everything old is new again.

I know what you mean.  For a few years I was afraid I had lost the
ability to be enchanted.  Oh, I appreciated many productions
intellectually, but the emotional connection was missing.  For me it was
a wondrous production of "The Winter's Tale" in Ashland, and Kenneth
Branagh's "Hamlet."  The passion is back.

Linda Hobbet

[6]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Carl Fortunato <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Thursday, 18 Jun 1998 11:22:39 EDT
Subject:        Fundraiser, including The Birth of Merlin.

The Play's the Thing Theatre Company (www.theplay.org) celebrates its
non-profit status with it's First Annual Fundraiser.

Featuring THREE COMEDIC ONE ACTS:

1)  "The Proposal" -
 A Comedy By Anton Chekhov
 Directed by Aubrey Starr

2) "Mid-Way"
An original comedy by Percy Lambert
Directed by  Larry Leventhal
& T. Walker Rice

3) "The Birth of Merlin"  -Act III
A comedy Attributed to  W. Shakespeare and W. Rowley
Directed by  Henry W. Oelkers

Socialize with Us Before & After Every Performance & See Video
Highlights of Past Productions, + Meet Our Company Members & Management

Place: The Producers Club
       358 West 44th Street. NYC Theater #8

Seating is Limited - Reservations Recommended - Call 212-604-4917

Date & Time: The Last Two Weekends of June
    6-19, 6-20, 6-26, 6-27 - Fri. & Sat. Nights 7-10 p.m.;
and
    6-21, 6-28 Sunday Matinee Performances 2:30 p.m. - 5:00 p.m.

FREE to The Public (with a Suggested Donation of $20.00).

Donations of $20 or more includes Gourmet Food & Drinks!

Food & Drinks also available ala carte for those donating less.

No One Turned Away!

* All Funds Raised Will Go Towards Our Next Season*
****All Donations are Tax Deductible****

Note: The *entire* "Birth of Merlin" is planned for a performance in
August - dates and times as yet unscheduled.
 

Other Messages In This Thread

©2011 Hardy Cook. All rights reserved.