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Home :: Archive :: 1998 :: June ::
Re: Apocrypha; Fencing; All Is; Titus; Iconography;
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 9.0591  Thursday, 25 June 1998.

[1]     From:   Melissa D. Aaron <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 24 Jun 1998 10:34:48 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 9.0578 Re: Apocrypha

[2]     From:   Ed Taft <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 24 Jun 1998 11:33:33 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Upward Thrusts

[3]     From:   Carl Fortunato <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 24 Jun 1998 13:14:43 EDT
        Subj:   Re: SHK 9.0585  DC in Shakespeare Saturation

[4]     From:   Michael LoMonico <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 24 Jun 1998 15:05:41 -0400
        Subj:   Titus Andronicus, the film

[5]     From:   Ron Ward <
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        Date:   Thursday, 25 Jun 1998 11:32:15 +1200 (NZST)
        Subj:   Re: Iconography and beyond

[6]     From:   Jonathan Hope <
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        Date:   Thursday, 25 Jun 1998 10:56:45 +0000 (GMT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 9.0589  Re: Contemporary Uses of Shakespeare


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Melissa D. Aaron <
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Date:           Wednesday, 24 Jun 1998 10:34:48 -0500
Subject: 9.0578 Re: Apocrypha
Comment:        Re: SHK 9.0578 Re: Apocrypha

Dave Kathman wrote:

>Interesting results.  I assume that "Cardenio" here refers to the text
>known to scholars as *The Second Maiden's Tragedy*, and not to Lewis
>Theobald's *Double Falsehood*.  *The Second Maiden's Tragedy* is a
>pretty good play, but it's been pretty conclusively established as a
>work of Thomas Middleton (by David Lake and MacDonald P. Jackson), and I
>know of no Shakespeare scholar who takes seriously Charles Hamilton's
>claim that it's by Shakespeare.  I doubt that many of the audience
>members were familiar with Middleton's work, and I wonder what the
>results would have been if they had been polled after hearing a reading
>of one of Middleton's plays.

I just recently saw a production of *The Second Maiden's Tragedy,"  and
without knowing that's it's been pegged as Middleton's, felt that it
reminded me more of Middleton than anything else.  I suspect, therefore,
that Dave Kathman is right: an audience familiar with Middleton probably
would have been more likely to identify the play as his.

I have a perhaps ignorant question:  it is beginning to seem to me that
almost every anonymous Renaissance play is attributed to Middleton.
*Second Maiden's Tragedy"?  Middleton.  *Revenger's Tragedy"?
Middleton.  Is everything by Middleton?  Is he the default playwright?
Or are there specific reasons for thinking that Middleton wrote so many
unattributed plays?

Melissa Aaron

[2]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Ed Taft <
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Date:           Wednesday, 24 Jun 1998 11:33:33 -0500 (EST)
Subject:        Upward Thrusts

Judy Lewis asks a very interesting question: what is a "mountanto" or
montanto in fencing? Someone on this list will know if it is a
legitimate or illigitimate "upward thrust." I suspect it is illegitimate
and refers at least in part to Benedick's past sexual adventures, one of
which might have occured while he was involved with poor Beatrice.

--Ed Taft

[3]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Carl Fortunato <
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Date:           Wednesday, 24 Jun 1998 13:14:43 EDT
Subject: 9.0585  DC in Shakespeare Saturation
Comment:        Re: SHK 9.0585  DC in Shakespeare Saturation

>Occasionally, the stage transforms itself into a brilliant gold,
>other times, the words "ALL IS TRUE" loom over the stage.  Could someone
>more informed that I tell me if the phrase has some specific source or
>meaning?

"All is True" is apparently a name that the play Henry VIII was once
known by.  There is a contemporary reference to a play that, by its
description, is clearly Henry VIII.  Some people think that that is the
original, proper title for the play, since it is a romance, and the
speculation is that is was mistaken for a History by some editors of the
Folio, and dubbed with a name that would be more proper for a history.

[4]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Michael LoMonico <
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Date:           Wednesday, 24 Jun 1998 15:05:41 -0400
Subject:        Titus Andronicus, the film

Julie Taymor (The Lion King) is directing this Titus Andronicus. Anthony
Hopkins, Kristin Scott Thomas and John Turturro may star. From what I
can tell, shooting has not yet begun.

Mike LoMonico
Editor
Shakespeare magazine
http://www.shakespearemag.com

[5]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Ron Ward <
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Date:           Thursday, 25 Jun 1998 11:32:15 +1200 (NZST)
Subject:        Re: Iconography and beyond

Chris J. Fassler says:

>First, whether you see the political message(s) of _Coriolanus_ as
>primarily "lampooning" republican democratic structures (Ron Ward) or as
>portraying "the class struggle" in a way that makes the populus appear
>"weak and unworthy" (Syd Kasten), either view of the play's politics
>make it unlikely to be a crowd-pleaser today.  (And in the US-where, of
>course, we don't HAVE socio-political classes-the latter is not only
>unpopular, but incomprehensible.)

The comment is apt in most respects. However I think he may be doing the
USA audiences a disservice when he thinks they will find the politics of
Coriolanus "incomprehensible" rather than challenging in a politically
cultural sense. Exposure to other cultures often evoke such reactions as
Chris suggests.

My point is that living within our comfort zone may be widespread human
behaviour, but it is always worth while to look at what people don't
focus on in S. Was Timon just an exersize in the Greek form, or did S
feel that something needed to be said? Like Coriolanus it seems to be
about the dangers of popularity that is based on either a political band
wagon (Coriolanus)or just the means to be a philanthropist
(Timon).Throwing money at problems is becoming less fashionable these
days, but lobby groups and good causes still abound. Timon seems to be
about happiness built on sand.  Timon is probably the least popular play
today. I would highly recommend the BBC version of Timon to anyone. It
provoked me to look at the other "minor" plays in a different way. My
impression is that Iconography will show that artists in particular
quite like this play, even though it is full of toadying artists of
dubious worth.

Ron Ward

[6]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Jonathan Hope <
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Date:           Thursday, 25 Jun 1998 10:56:45 +0000 (GMT)
Subject: 9.0589  Re: Contemporary Uses of Shakespeare
Comment:        Re: SHK 9.0589  Re: Contemporary Uses of Shakespeare

Wouldn't it be quicker (and more interesting) to list the things that
*don't* use Shakespeare?

Jonathan Hope
Middlesex University
 

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