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Home :: Archive :: 1998 :: June ::
Re: Apocrypha; Parking Lot; RSC Ham; SSEin DC;
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 9.0603  Monday, 29 June 1998.

[1]     From:   David J. Kathman <
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        Date:   Friday, 26 Jun 1998 22:29:07 +0100
        Subj:   Re: SHK 9.0598  Re: Apocrypha

[2]     From:   Carl Fortunato <
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        Date:   Friday, 26 Jun 1998 11:04:51 EDT
        Subj:   Re: SHK 9.0600  Shakespeare in Parking Lot; Rhetoric

[3]     From:   Andrew Walker White <
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        Date:   Friday, 26 Jun 1998 11:14:59 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   Champagne & Lollipops

[4]     From:   Hardy M. Cook <
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        Date:   Monday, June 29, 1998
        Subj:   SSE in DC

[5]     From:   Louis Marder <
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        Date:   Sunday, 28 Jun 1998 11:51:07 -0500
        Subj:   Re: Commonplace Books


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           David J. Kathman <
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Date:           Friday, 26 Jun 1998 22:29:07 +0100
Subject: 9.0598  Re: Fencing
Comment:        Re: SHK 9.0598  Re: Fencing

Richard Dutton wrote:

>I have no answer to Melissa Aaron's question about why so many anonymous
>plays are attributed to Middleton, tho' my own reading of 'The Second
>Maiden's Tragedy' (for what it is worth) suggests to me that it is
>indeed (mainly) his. But I think we should take seriously the argument
>advanced by Eric Rasmussen (SQ some years back) that some passages
>pasted late into the manuscript may actually be by Shakespeare.
>
>I also don't know what play was actually staged as 'Cardenio',

I'm pretty sure it was "The Second Maiden's Tragedy".  The production
Melissa Aaron saw in Evanston, Illinois, was presented as "Cardenio, or
The Second Maiden's Tragedy", based on Charles Hamilton's 1994 edition
of the play in which he argued that the play is by Shakespeare and the
MS is in his autograph.  David Bevington wrote an introduction for the
program in which he was diplomatically noncommittal about the
authorship.

>but I
>think those who quickly dismiss Theobald's 'Double Jeopardy' should know
>that Richard Wilson has recently argued a strong case for it indeed
>being based on a Jacobean original (its seems to allude, among other
>things, to circumstances surrounding the death of Prince Henry which
>Theobald himself almost certainly could not have known). This is not yet
>in print (tho' it will be) but has been argued at conferences.

Donald Foster, in still-unpublished work based on his SHAXICON project,
also makes a strong case for Theobald's *Double Falsehood* being based
on a Jacobean original by Shakespeare and Fletcher, based on vocabulary
overlap among other things.  He alludes to some of this work in his
article on the Funeral Elegy which appeared in PMLA in 1996 and in
*Shakespeare Studies* last year.

Jonathan Hope (who I believe is on this list) presented evidence in his
book *The Authorship of Shakespeare's Plays* that *Double Falsehood*
does not have the characteristics of Theobald's own work, and that it
may well be an adaptation of a work by Shakespeare and Fletcher.

Dave Kathman

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[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Carl Fortunato <
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Date:           Friday, 26 Jun 1998 11:04:51 EDT
Subject: 9.0600  Shakespeare in Parking Lot; Rhetoric
Comment:        Re: SHK 9.0600  Shakespeare in Parking Lot; Rhetoric

>I had a chance to see a very respectable production in the unlikely
>locale of a New York City Parking Lot-Julius Caesar. It's closing this
>weekend, and OTHELLO will begin next week, to be followed by HENRY V in
>August. More of the company, anon.

Aren't they a good group?  There are two groups like that, actually -
one is "Shakespeare in the Parking Lot".  And the other is "SOS" -
Shakespeare on a Shoestring.  Both of these groups are great.

Have you seen Guerilla Reps "Midsummer Night's Dream" in Washington
Square Park?  Personally, I don't care for them at all, but a lot of
people seem to love them.

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Andrew Walker White <
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Date:           Friday, 26 Jun 1998 11:14:59 -0400 (EDT)
Subject:        Champagne & Lollipops

Having seen the RSC's production (cheap, student rate, thank goodness)
of Hamlet, there was one bit of business I didn't understand.  When R&G
encounter Hamlet in the attic, they bring a bottle of champagne, 3
fluted glasses and lemon lollipops, presented to the tune of "East
Enders", I think.  Being a total ignoramus on soap operas, let alone
British ones, I'm clueless about the meaning of this little inside
joke.  Judging from the audience, nobody else got it either, but it must
have brought down the house in London...

Any guidance on this matter would be greatly appreciated.  The rest was
quite good, and I found the production much more worthwhile than some
previous posts had led me to believe.  Jennings was superb.

Andy White
Arlington, VA

[4]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Hardy M. Cook <
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Date:           Monday, June 29, 1998
Subject:        SSE in DC

Because I plan to attend the International Shakespeare Conference this
year and because I just returned from Atlanta where I was with my wife
and family for the International Food Technology meeting (Kathy had a
presentation.  By the way, she is a Analytical Chemist specializing in
nutrition and NOT a Food Scientist.) with a stop off in Union, SC, the
town my mother grew up in, I will not be taking my annual summer
vacation in Harrisonburg for the SSE Valley Season this summer.
Instead, I saw the SSE's Shr. and MM this weekend and will see R3 Friday
at the Folger Library's Elizabethan Theatre.

The SSE has done it again.  I have seen the work of seven of the SSE
companies, starting in 1990 with the company that performed JC at the
SAA Conference in Philadelphia, and I have never seen anything but the
finest ensemble acting in highly memorable productions.

In 1992, Stephen Booth wrote, "I first saw the Shenandoah Shakespeare
Express perform in Washington, D.C., in July of 1991.  I haven't thought
the same since about Shakespeare or the theatre" (SQ 43.4: 479).  I feel
exactly the same way.  Incidentally, the 1991 tour was the only one I
have missed since Philadelphia.

At $16 a ticket, the SSE is unquestionably the best Shakespeare bargain
currently in D.C.  [If anyone is interested, I'll send you off-line my
impressions of the original mounting of AWW and thus the reason I did
not go out of my way to see the Shakespeare Theatre's Free-for-All
production in Rock Creek Park.]

If you cannot make it to the Elizabethan Theatre this week, please
consider taking a Harrisonburg vacation between July 6 and August 8 and
seeing the plays during the Valley Home Season.  By the way, in
Harrisonburg, tickets are $12 for each show and $24 for the three play
series.  For information about the Valley season call 504 434-3366 or
e-mail 
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 ; For information about places to stay and
things to do in Harrisonburg, e-mail me privately. If you visit between
July 4 through 12, you can also take in the Green Valley Bookfair.

[5]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Louis Marder <
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Date:           Sunday, 28 Jun 1998 11:51:07 -0500
Subject:        Re: Commonplace Books

Dear David:  June 28, 1998:

I have the reduced size set of H-P's Shakespeare and also the huge Folio
set which is in 16 vols. The 16 vol set was printed in an edition of I
think 150 copies.  The reprint was selling for $1200 when it was issued
about 40 years ago. .That I think is the location of your material.  I
just want you to know that I have the material but I don't have the
facilities for xeroxing it - physical and also the time.  I am going to
Romania and the Ukraine on the 8th and am busier than a one-armed paper
hanger surrounded by bees.  If no one else can get you this material,
keep me in mind.  I return on the 22 of July and I will see what I can
do.  Louis Marder, 
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  The Shakespeare Data Bank.
 

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