1998

Qs: R/J Paintings; Female R3; SNL/Fargas Book

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 9.0548  Friday, 12 June 1998.

[1]     From:   Richard A Burt <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 11 Jun 1998 13:53:13 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   Romeo and Juliet Paintings

[2]     From:   Adam Schrecengost <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 11 Jun 1998 16:26:07 -0400
        Subj:   Female Richard

[3]     From:   Deb Bergeron <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 11 Jun 1998 17:20:54 -0600
        Subj:   Re: SHK 9.0544  Re: Shakespop


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Richard A Burt <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 11 Jun 1998 13:53:13 -0400 (EDT)
Subject:        Romeo and Juliet paintings

Doesn't anyone know where I could go to find nineteenth-century
paintings  (preferably kitschy) of _Romeo and Juliet_?

[2]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Adam Schrecengost <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 11 Jun 1998 16:26:07 -0400
Subject:        Female Richard

The Shenandoah Shakespeare Express, a touring company based in
Harrisonburg, Virginia, currently has a female (Kate Norris) playing
Richard in their production of *Richard III*. Does anyone know if
another professional theatre company has had a woman play this role?

Adam Schrecengost
c/o SSE - http://www.ishakespeare.com

[3]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Deb Bergeron <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 11 Jun 1998 17:20:54 -0600
Subject: 9.0544  Re: Shakespop
Comment:        Re: SHK 9.0544  Re: Shakespop

> Louis Marder <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.> wrote:
>
> > See my obituary on the front page
> > of the Spring 1990 issue of The Shakespeare Newsletter.
>
> Um...  really?  This gives a whole new spin to juno.com-perhaps a
> subsidiary of elysium.org?  Or have you greatly exaggerated the report
> of your death?
>
> Laura Fargas
> (co-author of a novel in which Shakespeare meets the undead, and
> therefore professionally curious on this point)

I'm interested in both the Newsletter and Laura's book--how can I see
the Newsletter and what is the name of Laura's book?  Is it published?

Thanks,
Deb Bergeron

Re: The Birth of Merlin

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 9.0547  Friday, 12 June 1998.

[1]     From:   Jasson Minadakis <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 11 Jun 1998 10:26:09 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 9.0543  Q: The Birth of Merlin

[2]     From:   Jim Shaw <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 11 Jun 1998 16:19:14 GMT
        Subj:   The Birth of Merlin

[3]     From:   Larry Weiss <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 11 Jun 1998 22:34:44 -0400
        Subj:   Re: The Birth of Merlin


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Jasson Minadakis <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 11 Jun 1998 10:26:09 -0500
Subject: 9.0543  Q: The Birth of Merlin
Comment:        Re: SHK 9.0543  Q: The Birth of Merlin

The Cincinnati Shakespeare Festival did a staged reading of The Birth of
Merlin this season as part of its Apocrypha Reading Series.  The actors
seemed to enjoy various aspects of the play, and many of the audiences
found parts very funny.

Final Score for the play was :
Shakespeare Did Not Write Any of the Play - 47
Shakespeare Did Not Write the Entire Play - 0
Shakespeare Wrote the Whole Play - 0

I have to admit that it was a tough sit, although not too long at a
complete text run at 1 hour 53 minutes.

One of the interesting things about the text was that we could not seem
to find a version that had been "edited" in a contemporary format.  Many
of the actors actually thought this might be an interesting project for
someone with a bit of time on their hands.

Jasson Minadakis
Artistic Director
Cincinnati Shakespeare Festival

[2]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Jim Shaw <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 11 Jun 1998 16:19:14 GMT
Subject:        The Birth of Merlin

The Birth of Merlin was directed by Denise Coffey for Theatr Clwyd from
1 June - 1 July 1989.   The most current contact details I have for the
company  are as follows;

Theatr Clwyd
County Civic Centre
Mold / Yr Wyddgrug
Flintshire
CH7 1YA, Wales, UK
Tel +44 1352 756331   Fax +44 1352 758323
email:  This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

I hope this information helps.

Yours,
Jim Shaw
Shakespeare Institute
Stratford-upon-Avon

[3]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Larry Weiss <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 11 Jun 1998 22:34:44 -0400
Subject:        Re: The Birth of Merlin

A trade paperback containing the text of this play and commentary was
published in 1989 by Element Books Limited, Longmead, Dorset.

Re: Various Hamlet Postings

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 9.0545  Friday, 12 June 1998.

[1]     From:   Ed Taft <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 11 Jun 1998 10:31:34 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   Various Hamlet Postings

[2]     From:   W. L. Godshalk <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 11 Jun 1998 20:38:29 -0400
        Subj:   Various Hamlet Postings


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Ed Taft <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 11 Jun 1998 10:31:34 -0400 (EDT)
Subject:        Various Hamlet Postings

I write to say "right on" to Sean Lawrence and his view that Hamlet is a
man of action. "Wherefore this image of a wimpy Hamlet," Sean asks.
Well, unfortunately, a lot of it comes from Olivier's *Hamlet,* doesn't
it? -- which, in my view, set *Hamlet* studies back 50 years. But at an
even more fundamental level, the problem is in the way we read the play,
I think. It seems to me that we spend too much time on the soliloquies
and not enough time on the plot. The former showcases Hamlet as a man of
thought, while the latter shows that he is also a man of action.
Moreover, the soliloquies tend to stress Hamlet's doubts and fears and
his ruminations about theological/metaphysical questions. All of that is
OK, but the balance is lost if we don't notice that the plot shows us
that Hamlet can act and that he goes right after Claudius, but as a
thinking man would, establishing that he is guilty and then figuring out
a way to cooperate with providence to bring about revenge. I end by
suggesting that it is Mel Gibson, with his overwhelmingly masculine
Hamlet (but with a tender side as well) that deserves the prize for the
best Hamlet in recent years.

--Ed Taft

[2]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           W. L. Godshalk <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 11 Jun 1998 20:38:29 -0400
Subject:        Various Hamlet Postings

Since I'm working on my Shakespeare syllabus for next quarto, among
other things, like searching for Bevington's new Arden edition of
<italic>Troilus and Cressida</italic>, I will not throw my gauntlets at
my attackers, but I would like to qualify Sean's description of the
bloody prince:

>Hamlet, after all, exercises daily by bloodsport, is beloved by
>the people of Denmark, and leaves a trail of smoking corpses everywhere
>he goes.  He was the only one to attack the pirate ship, keep in mind,
>which would seem to indicate that he's first into the breach.  The man
>is nature's blitzkrieg commander.

(1) bloodsport:  As I recall, Hamlet claims to fence every day. There's
no indication that blood was daily drawn.

(2) beloved by the people, says Claudius, but being beloved does not
make a good military commander.

(3) smoking corpses: Polonius, Laertes, and the king.  R&G are killed by
England, suborned by Hamlet.  Not really very impressive for a Red
Prince, and it takes him quite a while to get himself ready to drink hot
blood. Polonius is killed by mistake.  Laertes and the king are killed,
but, let's face it, they successful ambush Hamlet in a rather simple
trap.  What would Hamlet have done on the battlefield.  Let speculation
thrive!

(4) boarding the pirate ship:  one wonders.  Where are the Red Prince's
troops during this military venture?  Why is he captured rather than
killed in battle?  Are the pirates actually there to rescue Hamlet?

I agree with Ed Taft that Hamlet pere would approve of Fortinbras, and I
think that's one of the ironies of the play.  Hamlet fils, I think,
should not really be drawn to Fortinbras; puzzlingly he is. But Hamlet
really can't get it together to be like Fortinbras, and he ends up a
kind of quietist: there's a divinity that shapes our ends; so all ya
have to do is wait. Watch the sparrows.

David Evett writes:

". . . I believe that F's words, like words of similar
tone in the same spot of a dozen other plays, are aimed even more
directly than usual at the theater audience, and that unless subverted
by elements of performance (the egregious violence of the Branagh *Ham*,
for instance) or, in reader response terms, by a habitual politicization
that is in its own way essentialist, they work primarily (I'm trying to
avoid intentionality here) to confirm that audience's sense of something
of value lost, not to remind it at this stage of the play that
politicians are conniving bastards primarily motivated by self-interest"

Well, I am not against essentialism per se, but I would observe that
what Dave sees as my essentialism is merely replaced by his in this
passage.  At the end of <italic>Titus</italic>, Lucius's decision to
bury Saturninus, Titus, and Lavinia, while casting Tamora's body out for
the birds and beasts, to say nothing of burying Aaron alive, seems to me
to be quite political.  Lucius is in Rome, wants to be the next emperor,
so he gives all honor to the former emperor who was indeed a bastard.
So there. The counter example calls your case in question, sir.

I like Clough because I'm sophomoric.  Nuff said.

Yours, Bill

Re: Contemporary Uses of Shakespearean Materials

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 9.0546  Friday, 12 June 1998.

[1]     From:   Tanya Gough <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 11 Jun 1998 11:23:29 -0400
        Subj:   Re: Contemporary Uses of Shakespearean Materials

[2]     From:   Richard Nathan <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 11 Jun 1998 15:27:27 +0000
        Subj:   Re: Contemporary Uses of Shakespearean Materials

[3]     From:   Richard A Burt <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 11 Jun 1998 12:35:46 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   Re: Contemporary Uses of Shakespearean Materials

[4]     From:   Syd Kasten <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 11 Jun 1998 22:31:52 +0300 (IDT)
        Subj:   Re: Contemporary Uses of Shakespearean Materials

[5]     From:   Jeannette Webber <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 11 Jun 1998 23:44:57 EDT
        Subj:   Re: Contemporary Uses of Shakespearean Materials


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Tanya Gough <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 11 Jun 1998 11:23:29 -0400
Subject: 9.0542  Re: Contemporary Uses of Shakespearean
Comment:        Re: SHK 9.0542  Re: Contemporary Uses of Shakespearean
Materials

Thanks, Syd Kasten, for the data on Kaurismaki's films - my problem has
been in tracking them down on video.  Kaurismaki, for those of you who
might not know, is the director responsible for the very delightful, but
extremely weird "Leningrad Cowboys" movies.  If anyone knows of or has
seen the Hamlet or Macbeth on NTSC (North American compatible) video,
please, please let me know.

We may be on the other side of the world, Syd, but we're not entirely
out of the loop.

A few other titles which have been missed: Akira Kurosawa's "The Bad
Sleep Well," which has just come back into print, and the Japanese
animation cartoon "Ranma and Juliet," which we expect to have in stock
next week.

You can also consult our website for information of this nature - I've
tried to indicate the Shakespearean content in most of our entries.
Here's the address (purely for research purposes, you understand):
http://www.cyg.net/~yorick

Tanya Gough
Poor Yorick

[2]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Richard Nathan <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 11 Jun 1998 15:27:27 +0000
Subject: 9.0542  Re: Contemporary Uses of Shakespearean
Comment:        Re: SHK 9.0542  Re: Contemporary Uses of Shakespearean
Materials

I hope I may be forgiven for sending in another note about my own
contemporary use of Shakespearean material.  I'm referring to my
re-writing Shakespeare's tragedies for such comedians as Groucho Marx,
W.C. Fields, and Abbott and Costello.

My Hamlet parody was performed at Pasadena City College, where it was
very well received.  Hamlet is Groucho, the Ghost is Harpo, Horatio is
Chico, Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are Laruel and Hardy, and the
traveling players are the Three Stooges.  The script can be found on the
internet at http://www.dramex.org/plays/scripts/elsinore.txt

The King Lear parody has W.C. Fields as Lear, Groucho as the Fool,
Gracie Allen as Cordelia, Charlie McCarthy as Edmond, and Mortimer Snerd
as Edgar.  The Macbeth character has Lou Costello as Macbeth.  Lady
Macbeth starts out as a woman, but when she asks the spirits that tend
on mortal thoughts to unsex her, she turns into Bud Abbott.  Jerry Lewis
is Duncan, and Joe Besser is Malcolm.  These scripts are not available
on the internet, but I send them by e-mail to anyone who requests them.

I'm currently trying to find a publisher for all three scripts.  If I
can't get them published, I'll put them all up on the internet.

[3]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Richard A Burt <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 11 Jun 1998 12:35:46 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: 9.0542  Re: Contemporary Uses of Shakespearean
Comment:        Re: SHK 9.0542  Re: Contemporary Uses of Shakespearean
Materials

There all all kinds of adaptations discussed by the contributors to
_Shakespeare, The Movie_ (Routledge, 1997), Lynda E. Boose and Richard
Burt, eds.

[4]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Syd Kasten <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 11 Jun 1998 22:31:52 +0300 (IDT)
Subject: 9.0533 Re: Contemporary Uses of Shakespearean
Comment:        Re: SHK 9.0533 Re: Contemporary Uses of Shakespearean
Materials

Sometime in the sixties I read "The Green Man", a novelization by Henry
Treece of  Hamlet.

Best wishes,
Syd Kasten

[5]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Jeannette Webber <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 11 Jun 1998 23:44:57 EDT
Subject: 9.0538  Re: Contemporary Uses of Shakespearean
Comment:        Re: SHK 9.0538  Re: Contemporary Uses of Shakespearean
Materials

There's Robertson Davies' novel "Tempest Tost."

Re: Shakespop

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 9.0544  Thursday, 11 June 1998.

From:           Laura Fargas <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 10 Jun 1998 23:33:37 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: 9.0540  Re:  Shakespop
Comment:        Re: SHK 9.0540  Re:  Shakespop

Louis Marder <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.> wrote:

> See my obituary on the front page
> of the Spring 1990 issue of The Shakespeare Newsletter.

Um...  really?  This gives a whole new spin to juno.com-perhaps a
subsidiary of elysium.org?  Or have you greatly exaggerated the report
of your death?

Laura Fargas
(co-author of a novel in which Shakespeare meets the undead, and
therefore professionally curious on this point)

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