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Home :: Archive :: 1999 :: February ::
Re: Editions
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.0172  Tuesday, 2 February 1999.

[1]     From:   Tom Berger <
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        Date:   Monday, 01 Feb 1999 10:00 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.0167 Re: Editions

[2]     From:   Paul Werstine <
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        Date:   Monday, 01 Feb 1999 10:27:53 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.0167 Re: Editions

[3]     From:   Nick Moschovakis <
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        Date:   Monday, 1 Feb 1999 12:21:44 -0600
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.0167 Re: Editions

[4]     From:   John Jowett <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 2 Feb 1999 10:05:49 GMT
        Subj:   Re: Malone Society Publications


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Tom Berger <
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Date:           Monday, 01 Feb 1999 10:00 -0500
Subject: 10.0167 Re: Editions
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.0167 Re: Editions

There are some photofacsimile editions (2 Henry IV and MND and A Shrew
and R&J Q1 [forthcoming], off the top of my head) available from the
Malone Society.  It's just that one has to be a member of said group.
The annual dues are $27.00, and back issues are available to members.

Tom Berger  
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U.S. Secretary/Treasurer

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Paul Werstine <
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Date:           Monday, 01 Feb 1999 10:27:53 -0500
Subject: 10.0167 Re: Editions
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.0167 Re: Editions

Actually, the typographical distinctions in the Oxford-Norton <Hamlet>,
for example, do not mark variations between Q2 and F; instead, they mark
the differences between the 1986 Oxford edition (which while based
largely on F also includes many Q2 readings and some Q2-only passages)
and the Q2 passages the Oxford editors decided not to include in their
edition.

Caveat lector.

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Nick Moschovakis <
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Date:           Monday, 1 Feb 1999 12:21:44 -0600
Subject: 10.0167 Re: Editions
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.0167 Re: Editions

On the subject of recognizing textual contingency in classroom editions:
William Kerrigan's typically incorrigible manifesto (ostensibly a review
of Bloom) in last November's Lingua Franca has some trenchant remarks to
make about the Norton's decisions re. Hamlet and Lear, and their
potentially alienating effects on an undergraduate classroom. (Has the
list already responded to this essay?)

I have spoken with two teachers who have actually experimented with
writing assignments based on comparisons between the two Lears, and
whereas one reported that the attempt had worked (though we didn't
discuss exactly what its goals had been),the other reported a dismal
failure.

Incidentally, the acknowledgement of these issues in classroom editions
isn't new: even the old Pelican put brackets around speeches and scenes
that occurred only in one edition of a given play.

As for old-spelling, it's worth pointing out that the Everyman
paperbacks preserve many more original forms than any other widely
available (and comparably cheap) annotated editions. The notes do an
excellent job of explaining the significance of early modern practice,
such as the use of "I" not just for the first-person pronoun but for its
homonyms as well. I have used these editions repeatedly without apparent
damage to the students' comprehension of plots and themes; if anything,
it forced them to pay closer attention to the words they were reading.

On the other hand, the Everyman texts are idiosyncratic in that their
editor has randomly capitalized words throughout all the plays in the
series, in conformity neither to any textual exemplar nor to modern
practice - just to "give the reader a feel" for early modern
orthographic arbitrariness. This is rather odd, leading some students to
the misguided claim that capitalized words are being "emphasized by
Shakespeare."

Nick Moschovakis

[4]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           John Jowett <
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Date:           Tuesday, 2 Feb 1999 10:05:49 GMT
Subject:        Re: Malone Society Publications

Michael Ullyot asks whether Malone Society publications are readily
available.  The answer is yes, for those titles in print.  Prices are
stlg12.50 (members or stlg17.50 (non-members) for a single volume,
stlg15.00 (members) or stlg25 (non-members) for the larger 'double'
volumes. Enquiries and orders to:

Helen Moore (Orders Secretary),
Pembroke College,
Oxford, OX1 1DW,
UK.
E-mail <
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US membership enquiries should be addressed to Thomas Berger,
<
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 > (United States).

I will respond to other membership enquiries myself or refer them to the
appropriate local area treasurer.  Annual subscription is currently a
modest stlg15 (stlg10 for students).  Members receive the year's
publication without further charge, as well as occasional additional
volumes.

Forthcoming publications include a typefacsimile edition of the
manuscript play 'The Country Captain' (1999) and a photofacsimile
edition of 'Romeo and Juliet 1597' (Q1) (2000).  The latter will fill a
gap in the OUP Shakespeare Quarto Facsimiles series.

The Malone Society is committed to reproducing manuscripts and printed
texts of pre-1642 plays, as well as other documents relating to the
drama, to the highest standards of scholarship.  Its work has hugely
extended the resources available for the study of early drama, and its
publications provide model editions for those wanting to engage with the
material text.  The Society is a registered charity.

John Jowett (Publicity Officer)
 

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