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Home :: Archive :: 1999 :: February ::
Re: John; Bloom; CDs; Gilligan; Antonios
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.0179  Wednesday, 3 February 1999.

[1]     From:   Mike Jensen <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 02 Feb 1999 09:30:35 -0800
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.0177 King John in DC

[2]     From:   Barbara R. Hume <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 02 Feb 1999 14:09:48 -0700
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.0170 Harold Bloom on "How to Read"

[3]     From:   John Savage <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 2 Feb 1999 18:39:16 -0500
        Subj:   SHK 10.0176 Re: Norton CD-ROM

[4]     From:   Barbara R. Hume <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 02 Feb 1999 17:51:12 -0700
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.0174 Dobie Gillis: Oberon and Titania

[5]     From:   Peter Hillyar-Russ <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 3 Feb 1999 11:10:25 -0000
        Subj:   "Why are both ?"


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Mike Jensen <
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Date:           Tuesday, 02 Feb 1999 09:30:35 -0800
Subject: 10.0177 King John in DC
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.0177 King John in DC

I enjoyed Jimmy Jung's report on the DC KING JOHN.  It reminded me of
the only time I saw it on stage, this one at The California Shakespeare
Festival.  The production was doomed by costumes, wigs, and miscasting.

A good actor played the Bastard, but he was not good in this role.  He
wore a unconvincing wig that made him look like Sean Cassidy, and spoke
his lines with John Wayne's rhythms.  Imagine Wayne's voice saying:

   Will not a calf's-skin
   stop that mouth of thine?

And you get the idea.  (Lineation mine, to emphasize the pause.)

John was also doomed.  Played by the excellent Bruce Williams, he fought
with his wig throughout.  The ends of his Prince Valiant wig kept going
into his mouth and he constantly pulled them out.  Whenever he did, the
wide billowing sleeves of his purple robe fell to his elbows and sloshed
around with his movement.

Not one of CSF's finest moments, though Richard Elmore was stunning as
Pandulph.

I wrote it up for SHAKESPEAR BULLETIN a few years back if anyone wants
to know more, and by the way, the copy editor introduced a lie into that
account.  The battle took place around the outdoor theater, so the
audience could hear the battle and not see it.  The audience was
surrounded by it.  The battle did not take place "backstage" as the
editor put it.  I was embarrassed by this serious inaccuracy and pray no
one involved in the production saw the article.  It does them a great
disservice.

Also, by the way, the incorporation of lines from THE TROUBLESOME REIGN
OF KING JOHN is at least as old as John Barton's RSC production in the
70s.  Does anyone know of an earlier precedent?

Cheers,
Mike Jensen

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Barbara R. Hume <
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Date:           Tuesday, 02 Feb 1999 14:09:48 -0700
Subject: 10.0170 Harold Bloom on "How to Read"
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.0170 Harold Bloom on "How to Read"

As a Mormon, I'm now quite curious about this talk in SLC.  I hope I can
track it down and find out just what he said. Like most groups, we have
our own forms of in-jokes, but of course they don't make sense to anyone
else.

We are often amused by people insisting to us that we believe things
that have never been remotely a part of our religion, as though they
knew more about our beliefs than we do ourselves, but Bloom isn't that
kind of ignoramus.

Barbara Hume

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           John Savage <
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Date:           Tuesday, 2 Feb 1999 18:39:16 -0500
Subject: Re: Norton CD-ROM
Comment:        SHK 10.0176 Re: Norton CD-ROM

A question by Katy Stavreva:

>What does the Andromeda CD offer exactly (in addition to the Oxford
>text)?

"The Complete Works" -- but only some of the plays have notes; the
others have the text only.

[4]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Barbara R. Hume <
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Date:           Tuesday, 02 Feb 1999 17:51:12 -0700
Subject: 10.0174 Dobie Gillis: Oberon and Titania
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.0174 Dobie Gillis: Oberon and Titania

>Saw a Dobie Gillis episode the other day with Warren Beatty as a rival
>student who tries to get the girl they both want by tricking Dobie into
>auditioning for a play (in which the girl will be the lead) by doing A
>speech by Oberon.

Have we mentioned the hilarious musical Hamlet they did on Gilligan's
Island? Can't remember whether we did or not--got a mind like a steel
sieve--

[5]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Peter Hillyar-Russ <
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Date:           Wednesday, 3 Feb 1999 11:10:25 -0000
Subject:        "Why are both ?"

In his posting on the "Psychodrama" thread Robin Hamilton asks "Why are
both characters named Antonio ?"

This question (to which I have no answer) has puzzled me for some time,
along with two other "Why are both...?" questions;

1) Why are both scenes, in which lost children find their fathers and
then unexpectedly also discover their mothers, set outside the Temple of
Diana in Ephesus (with the mother emerging as Abbess in both cases) ?
(Comedy of Errors/Pericles)

2) Why are both plays in which a wronged woman is represented as dead
and buried, in order to effect a reconciliation with the man who wronged
her, both set in the capital of Sicily ? (Much Ado / Winter's Tale)

Are there any answers to these questions ? Are there any similar
peculiarities ?

Peter.
 

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