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Home :: Archive :: 1999 :: February ::
Re: Antonios
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.0185  Thursday, 4 February 1999.

[1]     From:   Larry Weiss <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 03 Feb 1999 13:33:28 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.0179 Re: John; Bloom; CDs; Gilligan; Antonios

[2]     From:   Robin Hamilton <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 03 Feb 1999
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.0173 Re: Merchant as Psychodrama

[3]     From:   Stephanie Hughes <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 03 Feb 1999 08:46:31 +0000
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.0179 Antonios


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Larry Weiss <
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Date:           Wednesday, 03 Feb 1999 13:33:28 -0500
Subject: 10.0179 Re: John; Bloom; CDs; Gilligan; Antonios
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.0179 Re: John; Bloom; CDs; Gilligan; Antonios

Peter Hillyar-Russ wrote:

>Why are both scenes, in which lost children find their fathers and
>then unexpectedly also discover their mothers, set outside the Temple
>of Diana in Ephesus (with the mother emerging as Abbess in both cases) ?
>(Comedy of Errors/Pericles)

This also happens in WT, but in Sicily and without the involvement of
Diana (unless Paulina is intended as her stand-in).  Why this exception
to the rule?

And in my copy of C/E the Abbess is described as living in a priory or
abbey, not the temple of Diana.

[2]------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Robin Hamilton <
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Date:           Wednesday, 03 Feb 1999
Subject: 10.0173 Re: Merchant as Psychodrama
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.0173 Re: Merchant as Psychodrama

>>But why are both characters named "Antonio"?

>Some answers are offered in a new book by Cynthia Lewis, *Particular
>Saints: Shakespeare's Four Antonios, Their Contexts, and Their Plays* (U
>of Delaware P, 1997). I've only read the review in Sixteenth Century
>Studies which arrived today - but it sounds like a convincing argument
>about preexisting traditions of association between Saint Anthony of
>Egypt and Saint Sebastian (!), with common overtones of "love and
>loving, selfishness and selflessness - charity and its limits"
>(according to the reviewer, Albert Geritz).
>
>Nick Moschovakis

Curiouser and curiouser-I'll look out for it.  There do seem to be
various possible links.  Both MV and 12thN fall within the probable span
of composition of the Sonnets, and in both cases-Antonio/Bassanio and
Antonio/Sebastian (picking up on the two saints business?) -- we're
presented with an older man and a younger man of a higher social
status.  Unless the Young Man of the Sonnets is a boy-actor, in which
case the social-distance wouldn't provide a parallel.

Robin Hamilton

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Stephanie Hughes <
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Date:           Wednesday, 03 Feb 1999 08:46:31 +0000
Subject: 10.0179 Antonios
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.0179 Antonios

>In his posting on the "Psychodrama" thread Robin Hamilton asks "Why are
>both characters named Antonio ?"

>This question (to which I have no answer) has puzzled me for some time,
>along with two other "Why are both...?" questions;

>1) Why are both scenes, in which lost children find their fathers and
>then unexpectedly also discover their mothers, set outside the Temple of
>Diana in Ephesus (with the mother emerging as Abbess in both cases) ?
>(Comedy of Errors/Pericles)

>2)Why are both plays in which a wronged woman is represented as dead
>and buried, in order to effect a reconciliation with the man who wronged
>her, both set in the capital of Sicily ? (Much Ado / Winter's Tale)

>Are there any answers to these questions ? Are there any similar
>peculiarities ?

Thanks for pointing this out. This is most interesting.

Shakespeare was more of a scene writer than one who saw a play in terms
of a whole. His approach was to string together a series of good scenes,
with, from time to time, a short "spacer" to fill in needed
information.  A good scene was more important to him than the plot. This
is not to say that he had poor plots (though some are poor), just that,
for him, the scene came first, plot integrity later. I believe that
Shakespeare had a much longer career than is assigned to him by
tradition, and that he had a great deal of early work that he would
pillage for scenes when he needed it.

The Queen's wardrobe was said to have contained 2000 gowns. A recent
researcher has shown that these gowns consisted of a collection of
bodices, sleeves, petticoats and skirts that could be assembled into a
variety of gowns. I believe that this is the way Shakespeare put
together many of his plays, particularly the romances and comedies.  If
we give him a long career, it is no surprise that he used a scene more
than once. These repeat scenes may tell us that the plays in which this
kind of repetition occurs were not current with each other.

Stephanie Hughes
 

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