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Home :: Archive :: 1999 :: February ::
Re: Antonios; Gilligan; Groundlings; King John
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.0195  Friday, 5 February 1999.

[1]     From:   Sean Lawrence <
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        Date:   Thursday, 04 Feb 1999 11:47:08 -0800
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.0179 Re: Antonios

[2]     From:   Bob Haas <
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        Date:   Thursday, 04 Feb 1999 15:40:53 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.0187 Re: Gilligan

[3]     From:   Rick Jones <
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        Date:   Thursday, 04 Feb 1999 09:58:12 -0600
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.0187 (Bloom)

[4]     From:   Melissa Cook <
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        Date:   Thursday, 4 Feb 1999 13:39:13 -0800 (PST)
        Subj:   Re: King John

[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Sean Lawrence <
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Date:           Thursday, 04 Feb 1999 11:47:08 -0800
Subject: 10.0179 Re: Antonios
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.0179 Re: Antonios

Stephanie Hughes writes:

>The Queen's wardrobe was said to have contained 2000 gowns. A recent
>researcher has shown that these gowns consisted of a collection of
>bodices, sleeves, petticoats and skirts that could be assembled into a
>variety of gowns. I believe that this is the way Shakespeare put
>together many of his plays, particularly the romances and comedies.  If
>we give him a long career, it is no surprise that he used a scene more
>than once. These repeat scenes may tell us that the plays in which this
>kind of repetition occurs were not current with each other.

An easier solution than saying that he recycled ideas from earlier plays
of his own would be to say that he often reused ideas by other
playwrights.  After all, the first reference to him is as "an upstart
Crow, beautified with our feathers" (on-line at
http://daphne.palomar.edu/shakespeare/timeline/crow.htm ) There's
nothing stopping Antonio and Sebastian from appearing in an earlier
play, now lost.  I'm quite certain that they appear in a later play.
Similarly with all the other bits of repetition.

Cheers,
Se

 

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