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Home :: Archive :: 1999 :: February ::
Re: Groundlings; Mooncalf; Ring/Fire/ Videos on Web
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.0269  Tuesday, 16 February 1999.

[1]     From:   Catherine Loomis <
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        Date:   Monday, 15 Feb 1999 12:35:10 -0600 (CST)
        Subj:   Re: Groundlings and Audience Thread

[2]     From:   Marti Markus <
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        Date:   Tue, 16 Feb 1999 01:26:13 +0100
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.0262 Qs: Mooncalf

[3]     From:   David Evett <
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        Date:   Monday, 15 Feb 1999 16:55:12 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.0259 Re: Ring/Fire

[4]     From:   George Burnell <
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        Date:   Monday, 15 Feb 1999 16:19:56 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.0255 Shakespeare Videos on the Web


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Catherine Loomis <
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Date:           Monday, 15 Feb 1999 12:35:10 -0600 (CST)
Subject:        Re: Groundlings and Audience Thread

I'm afraid I have limited storage space and deleted the message to which
I'm replying.  This is in reference to the discussion of the social
class of the Globe audience.

Antony Scoloker, in the splenetic preface to Daiphantus (1604), comments
on genre and audience:

"... yet your Genius ought to live with an honest soule indeed.  It
should be like the Never-too-well read Arcadia, where the Prose and
Verce, (Matter and Words) are like his Mistresses eyes, one still
excelling another and without Corivall; or to come home to the vulgars
Element, like Friendly Shake-speares Tragedies, where the Commedian
rides, when the Tragedian stands on Tip-toe.  Faith it should please
all, like Prince Hamlet.  But in sadnesses, then it were to be feared he
would runne mad."

Scoloker's scorn for the vulgars and their element, and for
Shakespeare's ability to please all, supports the conjecture that,
however they were paying for it, hard-handed men were getting to the
theater.

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Marti Markus <
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Date:           Tue, 16 Feb 1999 01:26:13 +0100
Subject: 10.0262 Qs: Mooncalf
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.0262 Qs: Mooncalf

>I am hoping someone on the list can lead me to sources that mention the
>monstrous origin of the word  "mooncalf."  I've been looking, even
>translating portions of early Latin texts, such as Aldrovandi's
>_Monstorum Historia_ in hopes of finding more information, though
>what I
>have found is very little.  Thus any guidance will be much appreciated.

It seems that the first mooncalf appeared only in the 16th Century, and
probably first in German (Luther, says the OED). A mooncalf is a false
conception, or misshapen birth, or monstrosity - for which the influence
of the moon was thought responsible. (cf. OED, lunatic, 2a)

The oldest reference in the OED is Cooper's "Thesaurus" (1565) for the
Latin word "mola".
www.chass.utoronto.ca:8080/english/emed/patterweb.html only features 1
entrance,

(1) Thomas Thomas, Latin/English dictionary, 1587
[M[. o]la,] [l[ae],] [f. g.] A mill: also a peece of flesh without
shape, or a hard swelling, growne in a womans wombe, which ma[[-]] keth
her to thinke shee is with childe, a moone calfe: also a cake made of
meale and salt, [Plin.] sometimes it is taken for [Mandibula.] [Mala
alata vel pneuma[[-]] tica,] [Iun.]

Kluge (Etymologisches Lexikon der deutschen Sprache) thinks that the
German word
"Mondkalb" was first only used for misshapen calves, but then extended
to human "monstrosities" in the 16th Century. The older  word for human
"monstrosities" was "manenkint" or "monkind".

The German poet Christian Morgenstern extended lunar zoology to a
moon-sheep, lat.  lunovis (lunovis in planitie stat, in his own
translation of one of his poems into Latin).

Moonstruck, M. Marti

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           David Evett <
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Date:           Monday, 15 Feb 1999 16:55:12 -0500
Subject: 10.0259 Re: Ring/Fire
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.0259 Re: Ring/Fire

"Ring of fire" can't come directly from the Busirane episode of The
Faerie Queene: both coming and going, Britomart encounters flames and
then the absence of flames only in the porch of Busirane's castle (FQ
3.11.21, 12.43).  I'd have thought Die Walkure a likelier source.

Pyrotechnically,
David Evett


[4]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           George Burnell <
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Date:           Monday, 15 Feb 1999 16:19:56 -0500
Subject: 10.0255 Shakespeare Videos on the Web
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.0255 Shakespeare Videos on the Web

Thanks to Benjamin Sher for his lead on Shakespeare videos at
Broadcast.com. I watched Hamlet, and the quality was quite good,
especially after reducing the screen size via the zoom control.

George
 

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