1999

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.0276  Wednesday, 17 February 1999.

[1]     From:   Terence Hawkes <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 16 Feb 1999 12:48:20 -0500
        Subj:   Groundlings and Literacy

[2]     From:   Robin Hamilton <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 16 Feb 1999 13:46:40 -0000
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.0259 Re: Ring/Fire

[3]     From:   P. Larus Reed <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 16 Feb 1999 16:58:22 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.0268 Bloom on Hyde


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Terence Hawkes <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 16 Feb 1999 12:48:20 -0500
Subject:        Groundlings and Literacy

Dear Rick Jones: You write: 'This discussion began as a response to
Terence Hawkes's assertion that Shakespeare's "illiterate" audience
helped create Romeo and Juliet.'  Not me, guv.  In my comments on
Shakespeare's audience, I was careful to make no use of the word
'illiterate'.

T. Hawkes

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Robin Hamilton <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 16 Feb 1999 13:46:40 -0000
Subject: 10.0259 Re: Ring/Fire
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.0259 Re: Ring/Fire

>An approximation is Henry Vaughan's
>
>            I saw Eternity the other night
>            Like three rings of pure and endless light
>            All calm as it was bright.
>
>Vaughan is not Elizabethan, but 17th c.
>
>John Velz

Picky, but: "Like a great ring of pure and endless light".

It's one of two poems which Vaughan called "The world", which used to
confuse me considerably.

On the Ring of Fire, I'd always taken this as coming from Lear's words
to Cordelia in 4.7:

Thou art a soul in bliss, but I am bound
Upon a wheel of fire, that mine own tears
Do scald like molten lead.

Robin Hamilton

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           P. Larus Reed <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 16 Feb 1999 16:58:22 -0500
Subject: 10.0268 Bloom on Hyde
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.0268 Bloom on Hyde

Neither a senator nor a cunning linguist be.

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