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Home :: Archive :: 1999 :: February ::
Re: Cunning Linguist
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.0292  Monday, 22 February 1999.

[1]     From:   Cary M. Mazer <
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        Date:   Friday, 19 Feb 1999 09:52:47 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.0289 Cunning Linguist Hamlet in N.L.

[2]     From:   Joe Conlon <
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        Date:   Friday, 19 Feb 1999 17:17:03 -0600
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.0289 Cunning Linguist Hamlet in N.L.

[3]     From:   Mary Tyler Knowles <
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        Date:   Friday, 19 Feb 1999 19:22:26 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.0289 Cunning Linguist Hamlet in N.L.

[4]     From:   John Savage <
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        Date:   Sat, 20 Feb 1999 09:23:44 -0500
        Subj:   SHK 10.0289 Cunning Linguist Hamlet in N.L.

[5]     From:   Caitlin Hannah <
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        Date:   Saturday, 20 Feb 1999 16:39:13 EST
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.0289 Cunning Linguist Hamlet in N.L.

[6]     From:   Patricia Cooke <
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        Date:   Sunday, 21 Feb 1999 13:11:23 +1200
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.0289 Cunning Linguist Hamlet in N.L.


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Cary M. Mazer <
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Date:           Friday, 19 Feb 1999 09:52:47 -0500
Subject: 10.0289 Cunning Linguist Hamlet in N.L.
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.0289 Cunning Linguist Hamlet in N.L.

>Anyone know of any more Shakespearean limericks? In fact any (preferably
>funny) poems will do.

Max Beerbohm has a series of limericks (not all of them all that clever)
about Shakespeare plays, originally printed in The Mask in 1924, and
reprinted in Max in Verse (The Stephen Greene Press, 1963).  My favorite
is:

No doubt you have heard of Othello--
An African sort of a fellow.
     When they say "You are black!"
     He cried "Take it back!
I am only an exquisite yellow."

Cary

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Joe Conlon <
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Date:           Friday, 19 Feb 1999 17:17:03 -0600
Subject: 10.0289 Cunning Linguist Hamlet in N.L.
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.0289 Cunning Linguist Hamlet in N.L.

Here's one I wrote.
   There once was a playwright named Will
    Whose plays are quite popular still.
    He wrote for us all
    Both the great and the small,
    Though most of his characters get killed.

Joe Conlon, Warsaw, IN, USA

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Mary Tyler Knowles <
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Date:           Friday, 19 Feb 1999 19:22:26 -0400
Subject: 10.0289 Cunning Linguist Hamlet in N.L.
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.0289 Cunning Linguist Hamlet in N.L.

>Also here's an anagram someone forwarded me the other day too. It kind
>of fits in the puzzle of the psalm 46 arguments.
>
>'In one of the Bard's best thought of tragedies our insistent hero
>Hamlet, queries on two fronts about how life turns rotten'.
>
>Anyone to pinpoint the soliloquy it begins?

"To be or not to be: that is the question, whether tis nobler in the
mind to suffer the slings and arrows of outrageous fortune."

Cheers,
Tyler

[4]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           John Savage <
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Date:           Sat, 20 Feb 1999 09:23:44 -0500
Subject: Cunning Linguist Hamlet in N.L.
Comment:        SHK 10.0289 Cunning Linguist Hamlet in N.L.

>'In one of the Bard's best thought of tragedies our insistent hero
>Hamlet, queries on two fronts about how life turns rotten'.

>> Anyone to pinpoint the soliloquy it begins?<<

It's from a fairly unknown passage that begins "To be or..."  (Sorry,
forgot the rest.  <g>)

[5]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Caitlin Hannah <
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Date:           Saturday, 20 Feb 1999 16:39:13 EST
Subject: 10.0289 Cunning Linguist Hamlet in N.L.
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.0289 Cunning Linguist Hamlet in N.L.

The anagram is derived from this soliloquy;

"To be or  not to be, that is the question. Whether tis nobler in the
mind to
suffer the slings and arrows of outrageous fortune."

Cheers, Caitlin Hannah

[6]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Patricia Cooke <
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Date:           Sunday, 21 Feb 1999 13:11:23 +1200
Subject: 10.0289 Cunning Linguist Hamlet in N.L.
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.0289 Cunning Linguist Hamlet in N.L.

>I saw the Nationale Toneel playing an excellent Hamlet last night in
>Amsterdam's Stadschouwburg. There's a limerick in the program book
>attributed to Stanley J. Sharpless. For the fun of Shakespeare here it
>is.
>
>Prince Hamlet thought Uncle a traitor
>For having it off with his Mater
>Revenge Dad or not?
>That's the gist of the plot,
>And he did- nine soliloquies later.
>
>Anyone know of any more Shakespearean limericks? In fact any (preferably
>funny) poems will do.
Here are some limericks by Dan Dungan of Nelson New Zealand which I
occasionally include in our SGCNZ newsletter:
>
>Also here's an anagram someone forwarded me the other day too. It kind
>of fits in the puzzle of the psalm 46 arguments.
>
>'In one of the Bard's best thought of tragedies our insistent hero
>Hamlet, queries on two fronts about how life turns rotten'.
>
>Anyone to pinpoint the soliloquy it begins?

To be or not to be

 from Pat Cooke
Wellington New Zealand
 

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