Make a Donation

Consider making a donation to support SHAKSPER.

Subscribe to Our Feeds

Current Postings RSS

Announcements RSS

Home :: Archive :: 1999 :: February ::
Re: "Soul"; HS Sh.; Hotstaff; Characters; Linguist
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.0310  Tuesday, 23 February 1999.

[1]     From:   Jerry Bangham <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Monday, 22 Feb 1999 20:13:21 -0600
        Subj:   RE: SHK 10.0300 "Shakespeare: Soul of an Age"

[2]     From:   Hugh Howard Davis <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Monday, 22 Feb 1999 12:56:04 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.0302 High School Shakespeare

[3]     From:   Marilyn A. Bonomi <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Monday, 22 Feb 1999 11:34:59 -0800 (PST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.0291 Re: Hotspur and Falstaff

[4]     From:   Drew Alan Mason <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Tue, 23 Feb 1999 07:27:32 +1300
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.0257 Re: Sh. Characters in Other Plays

[5]     From:   John Velz <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Monday, 22 Feb 1999 15:52:42 -0600
        Subj:   LIFE TURNS ROTTEN


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Jerry Bangham <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Monday, 22 Feb 1999 20:13:21 -0600
Subject: 10.0300 "Shakespeare: Soul of an Age"
Comment:        RE: SHK 10.0300 "Shakespeare: Soul of an Age"

>Our librarian has asked me whether or not a video entitled "Shakespeare:
>Soul of an Age" would be a useful addition to our video collection.

The video production was presented by NBC in 1962. It was written by Lou
Hazem and starred  Michael Redgrave with narration by Ralph Richardson.
It is a collection of scenes from Shakespeare. A piece of bardolatry I
suppose, but enjoyable.

The reason I can recall all of this is that the audio was released on a
Caedmon recording that I just pulled from my record collection.

I think it might be a pleasant addition to the collection of a library.

Jerry Bangham       http:/www.win.net/~kudzu/

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Hugh Howard Davis <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Monday, 22 Feb 1999 12:56:04 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 10.0302 High School Shakespeare
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.0302 High School Shakespeare

>The other trailer was
>for the adaptation of The Taming of the Shrew entitled Ten Things I Hate
>About You.  It's set in high school.

I read the recent Entertainment Weekly article about upcoming
Shakespearean films, and this is the obvious trend.  We are soon to have
high school/mall versions of Shrew, Macbeth (on a football field), and
Othello (taking place with a prep school basketball team).  The article
also talked about the "Gen X casting" for Branagh's LLL (incl. Alicia
Silverstone) and the upcoming modern day/original text Hamlet, with
Ethan Hawke.  The article was of course discussing the trend to bring
youth to Shakespeare, a concept helped by Baz Luhrmann's success, and
the trend can also be seen with the upcoming Cruel Intentions, which is
Dangerous Liaisons in high school.

My question is do list members think this will work?  The apparent idea
is to get both the highly coveted youth audience and the art
house/scholarly set to both go see the film (I might question how large
this audience truly is as well). But will they manage?  It seems to me
that many academics balk at Shakespearean films which merely appropriate
plot, so could this all backfire?

Hugh Davis

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Marilyn A. Bonomi <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Monday, 22 Feb 1999 11:34:59 -0800 (PST)
Subject: 10.0291 Re: Hotspur and Falstaff
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.0291 Re: Hotspur and Falstaff

Is it possible to return our discussion to SHAKESPEARE here on SHAKSPER?

I am heartily tired of the trashing AND the praising of various
political figures.  Whether I wish I'd been the woman on my knees to
Bill or the woman in the bed w/ Hyde, whether I am proud to admit that I
voted for BIll or that I voted against him, WHATEVER my politics, that's
not why I subscribe to SHAKSPER.

And what about our non-USA members... the multiplicity of whom Hardy
rightfully brags about?  Surely a subscriber from China or Australia or
Iran doesn't really want to spend his or her time reading political
discussion.

So some of us admire Hotspur, others Hal, others Falstaff.  Let's talk
about why in terms of the politics of England at the time of Henry
IV/Bill Shakespeare.  Let's leave the politics of the US at the time of
Bill Clinton to alt.news.salacious or alt.news.blindpoliticaladvocacy.

THANK YOU.

Now let's get back to talking about Shakespeare!  Is Othello more to be
pitied or scorned?  Is Cordelia deliberately setting up the renunciation
she earns from her father, and if so, why might she be doing so?  Isn't
Cleopatra more Roman than any of the Romans in that play?  Is
counter-cultural casting PC or simply reflecting the nature of today's
society?  How do you feel about Paglia's comments from Salon (outrageous
but incredibly well-written, says I!)?

Marilyn A. Bonomi

[4]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Drew Alan Mason <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Tue, 23 Feb 1999 07:27:32 +1300
Subject: 10.0257 Re: Sh. Characters in Other Plays
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.0257 Re: Sh. Characters in Other Plays

>There are many others, including one (I can't think of the name) in which
>the women of the bard's plays meet to talk.  I am quite certain someone
>on the list will know, and mention, it.  Good luck
>
> Cheers
* Shane R. Mueller

I believe that play is titled When Shakespeare's Ladies Meet.  It has (I
believe) Lady Macbeth, Ophelia, and a few others who meet with Juliet to
give her marriage advice.

Drew Mason

[5]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           John Velz <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Monday, 22 Feb 1999 15:52:42 -0600
Subject:        LIFE TURNS ROTTEN

Mary Tyler Knowles offers the To be or not to be soliloquy.  How about
an alternative that is a monologue rather than a soliloquy?  "So oft it
chances in particular men / That for some vicious mole of nature in them
/ . . . [They] Shall in the general censure take corruption / From that
particular fault.  . . . The dram of evil  / Doth all the noble
substance often dout / To his own scandal."  The whole monolog
(1.4.23-36 is about the mole of nature and its effects immediate and
long-range.)  This is Bevington's text and his interpretation of "dout"
(blot out).  Some will not find the passage that easy.  H. H. Furness in
working on his Variorum Edition of Hamlet in the 1870s referred to the
file in which he kept the hundreds of explications of this crux he had
turned up as "my dram shop." Olivier made this speech the centerpiece of
the play, reading it as if it were a tragic flaw and that Hamlet has
one.  Actually, Hamlet is talking about the Danish custom of heavy
drinking.  Which makes the "dram of evil" a fitting metaphor.

Cheers and a dram for Hamlet!

J. Velz
 

Other Messages In This Thread

©2011 Hardy Cook. All rights reserved.