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Home :: Archive :: 1999 :: February ::
Re: Bloom; Tilley
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.0316  Wednesday, 25 February 1999.

[1]     From:   Laura Fargas <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 23 Feb 1999 11:54:05 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.0309 Re: Listening in on Great Minds

[2]     From:   Stephanie Hughes <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 23 Feb 1999 11:10:54 +0000
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.0311 Q: Tilley


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Laura Fargas <
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 >
Date:           Tuesday, 23 Feb 1999 11:54:05 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 10.0309 Re: Listening in on Great Minds
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.0309 Re: Listening in on Great Minds

Stephen Holcombe <
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 > wrote:

>Actually, this might be even better as a description of Harold Bloom.

>He was phlegmatic, depressive, richly observant, yet worldly-wise. He
>had British Foreign Secretary Robin Cook's fierce, shrewd eyes; the
>young Orson Welles' precocious prodigality; Dirk Bogarde or Kevin
>Spacey's simmering sexual ambivalence; and the detached, brooding pride
>yet contained sensuality of Claude Rains in "Notorious" (1946), James
>Mason in "North by Northwest" (1959) and Peter Finch in "Sunday, Bloody
>Sunday" (1971).

!  Description hardly seems the word.  Mash note, maybe.  Where does
that toothsome description come from?  I think it needs a few more
alliterations.

My favorite Bloom story was told by a Yalie in the late seventies that
while Bloom and a student were walking along one of the paths at Yale, a
groundhog crossed the pavement in front of them, and Bloom exclaimed,
"My God-what will that be when it grows up?"  There's a funny caricature
of a critic, purportedly based in substantial part on Bloom, in one of
poet/novelist Stephen Dobyns' Saratoga mysteries-Yaddo (called Elysium
in the novel, I think) bends its rules and lets in a literary critic.
Murder ensues.

Laura Fargas

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Stephanie Hughes <
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 >
Date:           Tuesday, 23 Feb 1999 11:10:54 +0000
Subject: 10.0311 Q: Tilley
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.0311 Q: Tilley

>Does anyone know of an online text of Morris P. Tilley, A Dictionary of
>the Proverbs in England in the 16th and 17th Centuries (1950)?
>
>Thanks,
>Frank Whigham

If someone does know of such, please post on SHAKSPER as I too am
interested.  Thanks, Stephanie Hughes
 

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