1999

Research Studentships

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.0184  Wednesday, 3 February 1999.

From:           Jonathan Hope <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 03 Feb 1999 11:39:53 +0000 (GMT)
Subject:        Research Studentships

Research Studentships

The School of Humanities and Cultural Studies at Middlesex University,
London, UK is offering four fully funded three-year research
studentships (incorporating maintenance grant 


Nietzsche's Critique of Hamlet: A Query

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.0183  Wednesday, 3 February 1999.

From:           Parviz Nourpanah <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 3 Feb 1999 10:04:14 +0330 (IST)
Subject:        Nietzsche's Critique of Hamlet: A Query

Dear Members,

I have a question concerning Nietzsche's critique of tragedy, and I have
no one else to ask, so I hope somebody will help me.

N. says that Hamlet has "once looked truly into the essence of things"
and the resulting nausea has rendered him unable of committing any
action. In his own words "an insight into the horrible truth outweighs
any motive for action".

But in the paragraph before, he says it is the return to "everyday
reality " from the "raptures of the Dionysian state" which creates
"nausea: an ascetic, will-negating mood", which Hamlet suffers from.

Now I am wondering whether the state and moods he is describing  do
correspond to Hamlet, whether using Hamlet as an example is justifiable,
because, as far as textual evidence goes, Hamlet was never in a "rapture
of Dionysian state" as such, there was no "return to every-day reality",
nor has he "*once* [italics mine] looked truly into the essence of
things".

There are two possibilities, as far I see:

A) Either N. is thinking of Hamlet's "innocence", his state of mind
before his father's death, mother's remarriage, and his subsequent
learning about his uncle's guilt. However, I think to label that state
as "raptures...." is too strong a term, also the causal nature of the
events above and Hamlet's stage-by-stage awareness cannot be called a
look into the essence of things. I mean, that Hamlet didn't have a
split-second of awareness, a sudden insight into just one horrible
truth. The horrible truths where simply piling on him during the first
two acts.

B) Maybe N. means a sudden sexual awakening of Hamlet. While this
interpretation fits rather better with N.'s terminology (raptures,
annihilation of ordinary bounds, the lethargy which prevails once it is
over, and explicit mention of Hamlet "understand[ing] what is symbolic
in Ophelia's fate"), there is again no very strong textual support that
Hamlet's famous inaction is the result of sexual problems; that he is so
obsessed with his relation with, say, Ophelia, so disgusted or whatever
by it that he is quite overcome and unable to revenge himself. Come to
think of it, this is more or less what Polonius wants us to believe, and
Polonius was an old sycophantic self-promoting fool. And no, I don't
think that N. had in mind the Oedipus complex, in other words, I don't
think we can substitute Gertrude for Ophelia in the above sentences.

In any case, I'd very much appreciate some guidelines on these points.

Thanx a lot,
Nourpanah

Bona Bard

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.0181  Wednesday, 3 February 1999.

From:           Terence Hawkes <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 2 Feb 1999 13:49:30 -0500
Subject:        Bona Bard

A few years ago the BBC published tapes featuring Kenneth Williams, Hugh
Paddick and Kenneth Horne in some of  the 'Julian and Sandy' episodes
from the hilarious 'Round the Horne' radio comedy series of the 1960s
and 70s.  In one of them, 'Bona Bookshop', much is made of Julian and
Sandy's versions of Shakespeare in 'the parlary'. This is  an 18th
century actors' and coster-mongers' slang, drawing on Italian as well as
obscure Romany or Gypsy words, and actively used to this day within a
number of  subcultures in Britain, particularly those connected with
show business. I don't know if it's known in the USA: it ought to be. In
the parlary, 'omi' means 'man', 'polone' means 'woman', 'eek' means
face, 'riah' -obviously enough-means hair etc.   It's frequently
combined with rhyming slang as in 'Hampsteads', meaning 'teeth'
(Hampstead Heath) or 'Hobson' meaning 'voice'.  The 'Seven Ages of Omi',
as delivered by Hugh Paddick, with shrill encouragement from Kenneth
Williams has, in my view, classic status.  Wholly outrageous yet
-momentarily and astonishingly- moving, its climax is the account of
'second childishness . . nanty Hampsteads, nanty minces, nanty riah,
nanty everything'.

T. Hawkes

Arkangel Shakespeare Series

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.0182  Wednesday, 3 February 1999.

From:           Kenneth S. Rothwell <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tue, 2 Feb 1999 14:06:03 -0500 (EST)
Subject:        Arkangel Shakespeare Series

Writing about Harold Bloom in the New York Review of Books (18 Feb.
1999), Geoffrey O'Brien cites as one of many examples of the current
wave of interest in Shakespeare the recently inaugurated Arkangel
audiotape series.  The Arkangel project deserves the attention of
Shakespeareans who like to hear the language spoken. In the words of its
producers, Bill Shepherd and Tom Treadwell, the ambitious plan calls for
recording all "38" plays "uncut, fully dramatized and accompanied by
original music."  The actors will be "distinguished actors presently
performing in British Film and Theatre." Based on listening to four of
the productions (TN, Mac., MV, and Jn.), I'd say that these claims are
well justified. Trevor Peacock makes a first-rate Shylock who is both
villain and victim; Hugh Ross, an impressive Macbeth; and Michael
Maloney and Eileen Atkins stand out as a contentious Bastard and as a
forlorn Constance in an exemplary King John. Because the actors put
speaking above singing, the meaning of Shakespeare's language receives
top priority, though there is nevertheless a firm residue of lyrical
beauty. Will Keen's Gratiano, for example, doesn't hesitate to speak to
Nerissa (Alison Reid) about the ring in definitely non-RP accents, but
Hugh Ross's Macbeth generates the elocutionary power associated with
this fabled role.  On the basis of what I have so far heard, I highly
recommend these recordings. They come as handsomely packaged CDs from
Viking Penguin and are available in the U.K. from the Audio Book
Collection, and in the USA through Amazon.com and I imagine other
resources as well.  Kenneth S. Rothwell

Re: Dan Burton, Shakespearean Scholar

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.0180  Wednesday, 3 February 1999.

[1]     From:   Clifford Stetner <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 2 Feb 1999 13:37:35 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.0166 Dan Burton, Shakespearean Scholar

[2]     From:   John Savage <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 2 Feb 1999 18:39:34 -0500
        Subj:   SHK 10.0166 Dan Burton, Shakespearean Scholar


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Clifford Stetner <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 2 Feb 1999 13:37:35 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 10.0166 Dan Burton, Shakespearean Scholar
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.0166 Dan Burton, Shakespearean Scholar

>While surfing for websites on Henry V, I came upon Representative Dan
>Burton's list of favorite poems, which includes Henry's "band of
>brothers" speech.  Representative Burton tells us that "King Henry V is
>one of my best-loved heroes because he went up against insurmountable
>odds to conquer an army far superior in numbers to his own army of men.

Why do I have a vision of the US Congress aiming their longbows at
crowds of Americans storming the Capitol building?

Clifford Stetner
CUNY

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           John Savage <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 2 Feb 1999 18:39:34 -0500
Subject: Dan Burton, Shakespearean Scholar
Comment:        SHK 10.0166 Dan Burton, Shakespearean Scholar

>Representative Burton tells us that "King Henry V is
>one of my best-loved heroes because he fought with honor and dignity"

Especially when he was killing his prisoners.  <g>

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