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Home :: Archive :: 1999 :: January ::
Re: Classrooml Paris; Parodies; PC
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.0051  Tuesday, 12 January 1999.

[1]     From:   Helen Schwart <
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        Date:   Monday, 11 Jan 1999 09:08:13 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   SHK 10.0036  Q: The Electronic Classroom

[2]     From:   David J. Kathman <
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        Date:   Monday, 11 Jan 1999 19:08:20 -0600 (CST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.0045  Re: Massacre at Paris

[3]     From:   Marilyn Bonomi < 
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        Date:   Monday, 11 Jan 1999 12:32:12 -0800 (PST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.0046  Shakespeare in popular culture

[4]     From:   Barrett Fisher <
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        Date:   Monday, 11 Jan 1999 08:45:35 -0500
        Subj:   Urban Myth


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Helen Schwart <
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Date:           Monday, 11 Jan 1999 09:08:13 -0500 (EST)
Subject: Q: The Electronic Classroom
Comment:        SHK 10.0036  Q: The Electronic Classroom

I've been teaching Shakespeare on-line for several years.  You can get
an overview of the class from my homepage and a link to a paper that I
gave at NCTE--"Is the Future Here Yet" at www.iupui.edu/~hschwart

Hope this is useful.

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           David J. Kathman <
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Date:           Monday, 11 Jan 1999 19:08:20 -0600 (CST)
Subject: 10.0045  Re: Massacre at Paris
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.0045  Re: Massacre at Paris

Stevie Simkin wrote:

>Stephanie Hughes wrote:
>
>> I noticed that Massacre at Paris is about half the length of Faustus,
>> Tamburlaine or Malta, which causes me to think that it may have been
>> severely edited.
>
>The main problem with Massacre is that the text is severely corrupt.
>The version that we have inherited is widely acknowledged as a very poor
>text, its frequent oddities and occasional gibberish implying that it is
>a memorial reconstruction.  Running to only around 1,250 lines, it is
>half the length of The Jew of Malta or Edward II, and the blank verse is
>strikingly uneven, further evidence of the corrupt nature of the text.
>The date of the text we have is not given on the title page; the best
>guess is 1602 for a play that probably dates from around 1592.  It's
>quite fun to read, probably not very rewarding to stage, and is strongly
>anti-Catholic, in the pattern of _The Jew_ and Faustus.
>
>Incidentally, there is a manuscript leaf of Massacre at the Folger.  As
>far as I can tell, the latest consensus on this is that it may well have
>been written by Marlowe himself.  Or has that been discredited since
>Adams and Boas?

I don't know that "discredited" is the right word, but there is
certainly no consensus, and most modern scholars are decidedly more
skeptical than Adams and Boas.  The most recent opinion that I'm aware
of is that of Paul Werstine, who wrote the following in his chapter
"Plays in Manuscript" in A New History of Early English Drama (1997),
pp.491-2:

"Greg's choice of the Massacre at Paris fragment located at the Folger
Library as his third and last extant example of "fowle papers" seems
desperate.  The provenance of this irregularly shaped leaf is unknown, a
circumstance perilous for the erection of any scholarly conjecture,
especially in light of the existence for well over a century now of a
increasingly lucrative market for forgeries of documents alleged to have
been associated with Shakespeare and his contemporaries.  The leaf bears
no sign of free composition:  not so much as a single letter, let alone
a word, has been erased (that is, crossed out), and so there has been
absolutely no revision either currente calamo or afterward.  There are
also none of the other stigmata that, according to Greg, mark "fowle
papers".  Instead, for example, of a variety of designations for the
same character-role, such as are supposed to appear in "fowle papers",
the speech prefixes are exactly the same as the names in the stage
directions and are completely uniform.  The handwriting, unlike that of
The Captives or of Hand B in Sir Thomas More, is immediately legible.
This handwriting bears no resemblance to the single signature ever
attributed to Marlowe; yet if the fragment is to be "fowle papers the
handwriting would have to be that of the play's "author" (Alton).  Such
is the "optimism" inspired by Pollard and Greg that many, though not
all, twentieth-century scholars and editors have accepted the fragment
as authentic (Adams; Nosworthy, "Marlowe"; Oliver, lviii-lix; Marlowe,
Complete Works, ed. F. Bowers, Cambridge U.P. (1973), 1:358)."

Alton = R. E. Alton, "Marlowe Authenticated", Times Literary
Supplemented,
   April 26, 1974, pp. 446-7.

Adams = J. Q. Adams, "The Massacre at Paris Leaf", The Library, 4th
ser.,
   14 (1934): 447-69.

Nosworthy, "Marlowe" = J. M. Nosworthy, "The Marlowe Manuscript",
   The Library, 4th ser., 26 (1946): 158-71.

Oliver = H. J. Oliver, ed., *Dido Queen of Carthage; The Massacre at
   Paris*. London: Methuen, 1968.

Dave Kathman

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[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Marilyn Bonomi < 
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Date:           Monday, 11 Jan 1999 12:32:12 -0800 (PST)
Subject: 10.0046  Shakespeare in popular culture
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.0046  Shakespeare in popular culture

Probably the wrong subject header, but another delightful little
pastiche of Skakespeare is at
http://www.cco.caltech.edu/~totem/v101/raymond.html Site is called
Raymond Chandler's Hamlet

Marilyn Bonomi

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[4]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Barrett Fisher <
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Date:           Monday, 11 Jan 1999 08:45:35 -0500
Subject:        Urban Myth

Mike Sirofchuck inquired:

>A colleague recently related to me the tale of a professor from the Univ
>of Arizona who was supposedly dismissed from his position for teaching
>Shakespeare and refusing to "correct" the Eurocentrism and gender bias
>contained therein.

>Is this an urban myth or is there any truth to the tale?

This is essentially true, though the institution is Arizona State
University, and Shakespeare was the flash point for a larger
conflagration.  The professor in question is Jared Sakren, who has sued
the Arizona State University Board of Regents "for violating his federal
and state civil rights by discriminating against him because of his
European descent and his use of male-authored European works in his
teachings."  I quote from the Fall 1998 issue of "Campus" magazine (a
national publication by students for students); the author is David
Kalstein, a senior at the University of Pennsyvania.  He states that the
case was reported in U.S.  News & World Report "and other national
publications."  I haven't checked on this, I may have seen an article in
"Lingua Franca" or "The Chronicle of Higher Education" as well.

Barrett Fisher
Bethel College (MN)
 

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