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Home :: Archive :: 1999 :: January ::
Re: Drama or Theatre
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.0095  Tuesday, 19 January 1999.

[1]     From:   Tim Perfect <
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        Date:   Friday, 15 Jan 1999 11:22:02 -0800 (PST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.0070 Re: Literature, Music, Language

[2]     From:   Harry Hill <
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        Date:   Saturday, 16 Jan 1999 09:12:26 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.0070 Re: Literature, Music, Language

[3]     From:   Terence Hawkes <
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        Date:   Tue, 19 Jan 1999 07:58:08 -0500
        Subj:   Drama or Theatre


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Tim Perfect <
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Date:           Friday, 15 Jan 1999 11:22:02 -0800 (PST)
Subject: 10.0070 Re: Literature, Music, Language
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.0070 Re: Literature, Music, Language

>Ed Pixley makes an interesting point: 'Theater is
>truly the most collaborative of the arts'. But
>theatre isn't a ART, is it?  Drama is the art.
>Theatre/theater is the building in which some forms
>of that art take place.

You say tomato, I say tomato...hey that doesn't work on email.

You say tomayto, I say tomahto...

There we go.

Tim Perfect

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Harry Hill <
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Date:           Saturday, 16 Jan 1999 09:12:26 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: 10.0070 Re: Literature, Music, Language
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.0070 Re: Literature, Music, Language

Reading Takashi Kozuka's citing of Anthony B.Dawson's statement that
'our current familiarity [with Shakespeare's plays]...is generally a
consequence of reading, and certainly our study we well as our judgement
of performances, depends on reading, which is always what drives
interpretation.....Reading it is performing it', I see that such
definitions of reading are unclear at least and unfair at most. The view
seems to be that there's less here than meets the ear?

Since Johnson's inability to bear the death of Cordelia, and of course
Lamb's romantic assertion that King Lear is unactable, the study has
indeed been a safer and 'richer' place for the reading of what are
considered the major works; we can censor ourselves by the fireplace and
provide imaginative 'readings' undoubtedly unperformable in a physical
way. The imaginative energy unimpeded by the interpretation of others is
quite simply another sort of experience, essentially inartistic
precisely because of this absence of a vocal and visible interlocutor.
Neither activity can be said to be superior.

As arguments, each remains definable but unanswerable.

        Harry Hill

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Terence Hawkes <
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Date:           Tue, 19 Jan 1999 07:58:08 -0500
Subject:        Drama or Theatre

The distinction between 'drama' and 'theatre' makes possible a perfectly
plausible and non-contradictory position which can be formulated as 'I
like drama and I detest theatre'. Since this is the position evidently
endorsed by the vast majority of the population of Britain and North
America, it seems foolish to deny that it is feasible. At a rough guess,
I'd say that there are more pigeon-fanciers in the United Kingdom than
regular theatre-goers. Enormous numbers of people continue nonetheless
to engage with and respond to drama of extremely high quality on
television and in the cinema. The sky has not yet fallen. Our withers
are unwrung.

Terence Hawkes
 

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