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Home :: Archive :: 1999 :: January ::
Re: Brush Up . . .
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.0127  Saturday, 23 January 1999.

[1]     From:   Christine Cornell <
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        Date:   Fri, 22 Jan 1999 09:17:31 AST4ADT
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.0119 Re: Brush Up . . .

[2]     From:   John Savage <
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        Date:   Fri, 22 Jan 1999 09:58:18 -0500
        Subj:   SHK 10.0119 Re: Brush Up . . .


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Christine Cornell <
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Date:           Fri, 22 Jan 1999 09:17:31 AST4ADT
Subject: 10.0119 Re: Brush Up . . .
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.0119 Re: Brush Up . . .

As a Canadian, I have to admit rather limited interest in this
discussion (maybe the sort of fascination I associate with watching
"Crash").  But I am curious about the absence of discussion among the
academics on the list of the firing of the editor of JAMA.  Should the
timing of the publishing of research have serious career consequences?
The sound bites (admittedly few on Canadian news) suggested academic
journals and research should not get involved in issues of public
debate: do we buy this?

>Again, I don't want to drop the important point of the thread here. As
>any number of critics and theorists have pointed out, Shakespeare and
>allusions to Shakespeare are culturally validated counters allowing us,
>to for instance, distinguish between cultivated members of the educated
>and trailer trash. And that's worth thinking about.

I too would like to see more on this discussion, although some of my
friends who probably count as trailer trash do use Shakespeare as a
counter too.  Why dropping out in grade ten wasn't such a bad idea, why
too much money is wasted on teaching useless things, etc.

Finally, could I add a historical inquiry?  Ben Jonson quite happily
relates the story of an affair with a woman who would allow as Andreas
Capellanus puts it, "Every act but the last one."  Forman reports
similar behaviour by Amelia Lanyer.  Andreas explains that such
behaviour is not adultery and hurts no one even if the lovers allow
themselves "every other solace" (I believe that is his wording).  Has
anyone else come across similar reference in the sixteenth century?  Are
there any in the drama, for instance?

Christine Cornell

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           John Savage <
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Date:           Fri, 22 Jan 1999 09:58:18 -0500
Subject: Re: Brush Up . . .
Comment:        SHK 10.0119 Re: Brush Up . . .

>All this reminds me of a wonderful piece of WC wit I saw many years ago:
>"No matter who you vote for the Government always gets in."

Or as Twain said, "I never vote.  It just encourages them."
 

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