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Home :: Archive :: 1999 :: January ::
Re: Friedmans; Electronic; Moth; Order; Poetry; Sh.
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.0134  Monday, 25 January 1999.

[1]     From:   John Velz <
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        Date:   Sun, 24 Jan 1999 01:15:10 -0600
        Subj:   The Friedmans

[2]     From:   Michael Mullin <
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        Date:   Saturday, 23 Jan 1999 21:25:26 +1100
        Subj:   Re: The Electronic Classroom

[3]     From:   Larry Weiss <
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        Date:   Saturday, 23 Jan 1999 09:46:15 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.0126 Re: Moth, mote, mought, moat

[4]     From:   Roger Schmeeckle <
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        Date:   Saturday, 23 Jan 1999 14:49:13 -0800 (PST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.0109 Order of plays?

[5]     From:   John Velz <
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        Date:   Sun, 24 Jan 1999 00:49:34 -0600
        Subj:   Poet on Poetry

[6]     From:   Stephanie Hughes <>
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        Date:   Sun, 24 Jan 1999 06:09:34 +0000
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.0115 Re: Shakespeare in Love


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           John Velz <
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Date:           Sun, 24 Jan 1999 01:15:10 -0600
Subject:        The Friedmans

Martin Green and Syd Kasten:  The Friedmans-and that is "Elisabeth", not
"Elizabeth", I think-were on the kryptanalytic team that cracked the
Japanese code in World War II.  They belonged to the Cosmos Club in D.C.
where Monica sightings were reported in 1998. There another member of
the Cosmos, James G. McManaway of the Folger, first Editor of
Shakespeare Quarterly, met them some time late in or after the war, as I
recall..  He proposed to them that they might find interest in the
various codes that have been proposed in the authorship whirligig and
they rose to the challenge.  They used the same methods they had used on
the Japanese code to test (apparently) every major code ever proposed,
including Senator Ignatius Donnelly's massive The Great Cryptogram from
the late nineteenth century.  They had no bias, no preconceived notion
about Shakespeare, actually knew very little about the plays, if I
remember correctly.  They concluded after some years of work that no
code they had examined proved or disproved anyone's authorship of
anything.  Hence the book under discussion.

Cheers!
John Velz

[Editor's Note: I had Prof. McManaway for a graduate Shakespeare class
in the early 1970s. Upon returning my paper (these were the days before
word processing), this kindly gentleman threw it down in front me and in
a mock tone of anger and indignation asked, "Did you type this paper
yourself?" To which, I meekly responded, "Yes." To which, he replied of
my hyphenating of the dramatist's name: "It's SHAKE SPEAR NOT SHAKES
PEAR." I have never forgotten the that incident. Hardy]

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Michael Mullin <
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Date:           Saturday, 23 Jan 1999 21:25:26 +1100
Subject:        Re: The Electronic Classroom

SHAKSPERians may wish to visit CyberShakespeare
<www.CyberShakespeare.uiuc.edu> to see an electronic mock-up of an
on-line Shakespeare module. Programming begins this month, with an
interactive prototype scheduled for May, 1999.

Comments are welcome.

Michael Mullin

PS. See also <www.shakespeare.uiuc.edu> for a library of links.

Michael Mullin
Professor of English
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Larry Weiss <
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Date:           Saturday, 23 Jan 1999 09:46:15 -0500
Subject: 10.0126 Re: Moth, mote, mought, moat
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.0126 Re: Moth, mote, mought, moat

Carol Barton wrote:

>John Velz:    >The pun in the title of Much Ado About Nothing depends on
>the th as t.  The play is much ado about Noting things.
>
>Larry Weiss:  >I thought the pun was "No-Thing," a slang expression for
>female
>genitalia.  Cf. Ham,III.ii.
>
>John requires the audience to first see the play in order to get the
>pun.  My interpretation seems calculated to drag them in.
>
>Carol Barton:  Both Larry and John are right, of course -- but it is also
>about noting, as in penning missives.
>
>And only HALF the potential audience would be motivated by the English
>you put on it, Counsel.  The rest of us don't have a thing about
>"things."
>
>(Sigh.)

Pity.

[4]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Roger Schmeeckle <
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Date:           Saturday, 23 Jan 1999 14:49:13 -0800 (PST)
Subject: 10.0109 Order of plays?
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.0109 Order of plays?

>you suggest I read, and in what order; 2) someone to take me under their
>wing & work with me on whatever play I'm on [which is King Lear at the
>moment], and 3) everybody's patience when I post simple questions! [No

While I'm probably not the right person to take you under my wing, I am
quite familiar with King Lear, having taught it 50 or 60 times when I
was a high school teacher, and I would be glad to entertain any
questions you might raise, or just to dialogue about it.

I regard the play as the "fifth gospel."  In other words, I interpret it
as a work deeply influenced by Christian values.

To think about: why the double plot?  can the characters be arranged in
a spectrum from good to evil?  why the movement from references to pagan
deities to God at the end of the play (God's spies)?  How is that
reference to God's spies to be interpreted?  etc.

No problem if you've already gone on to other things, or lack the time
to pursue this, but if you have a continuing interest in Lear, and want
to share insights, let me hear from you.

     Roger Schmeeckle

[5]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           John Velz <
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Date:           Sun, 24 Jan 1999 00:49:34 -0600
Subject:        Poet on Poetry

Betty Oakes  may be thinking of John Ciardi a poet and translator, who
said "A poem should not mean but be".  Hope I got the quotation right.
If I remember right he wrote a book with that title.

Cheers!
John Velz

[6]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Stephanie Hughes <>
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Date:           Sun, 24 Jan 1999 06:09:34 +0000
Subject: 10.0115 Re: Shakespeare in Love
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.0115 Re: Shakespeare in Love

We all know that the movie "Shakespeare in Love" is 90 percent fantasy.
For a more likely view of the story behind the writing of "Romeo and
Juliet," check out "Shakespeare in Love: The True Story," at the
following location:

The Shakespeare Authorship SOURCEBOOK
http://home.earthlink.net/~mark_alex/

Comments are welcome, but probably should be sent privately, or to the
SOURCEBOOK.

Stephanie Hughes

[Editor's Note: This site advocates that the Earl of Oxford is the
author of the plays attributed to William Shakespeare. If you are
interested in the proposition that William Shakespeare was the author of
these works, see The Shakespeare Authorship Page (David Kathman and
Terry Ross)  <http://www.bcpl.lib.md.us/~tross/ws/will.html>. Hardy]
 

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