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Home :: Archive :: 1999 :: January ::
Re: Spear-shakin
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.0135  Tuesday, 26 January 1999.

[1]     From:   Andrew Murphy <
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        Date:   Monday, 25 Jan 1999 09:23:41 +0000
        Subj:   Spear-shakin'

[2]     From:   Jean Peterson <
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        Date:   Monday, 25 Jan 1999 14:31:18 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Spear-shakin'


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Andrew Murphy <
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Date:           Monday, 25 Jan 1999 09:23:41 +0000
Subject:        Spear-shakin'

>For what it's worth the late
>Norman MacCaig (a very good Scottish poet) assured me that Shakespeare
>was Scottish.  When I asked how he knew he replied: "The sheer ability
>of the man justifies the assertion".

Even located in the East Neuk of Fife, I must disagree. It's been well
known in my native land for many years that Shakespeare was an Irish
bard and that he employed Francis Bacon to translate his plays into
English . . .

Andrew

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Jean Peterson <
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Date:           Monday, 25 Jan 1999 14:31:18 -0500 (EST)
Subject:        Spear-shakin'


Re: John Drakakis' posting:

>For what it's worth the late
>Norman MacCaig (a very good Scottish poet) assured me that Shakespeare
>was Scottish.  When I asked how he knew he replied: "The sheer ability
>of the man justifies the assertion"...

The thinking is uncannily like that demonstrated by the Klingon in the
Star Trek IV film ("The Undiscover'd Country"), who asserts, "You
haven't read Shakespeare until you've read him in the original Klingon."

By the way, can anyone who has seen the latest Trek film tell me whether
or not Shakespeare makes an appearance as transcendent cultural
signifier?  I thought it was curious that in the last film ("First
Contact")  the Trek tradition of constant Shakespeare references seemed
to have been dropped in favor of "Moby Dick."  So is it more harpoons,
or back to Spear-shakin'?  Just wondering.

Jean Peterson
Bucknell University
 

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