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Home :: Archive :: 1999 :: January ::
Re: Spear-shaking
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.0144  Thursday, 28 January 1999.

[1]     <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 6 Jan 1999 11:04:18 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.0135 Re: Spear-shakin'

[2]     From:   John Savage <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 27 Jan 1999 09:50:05 -0500
        Subj:   SHK 10.0124 Re: Spear-shaking

[3]     From:   Robin Hamilton <
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        Date:   Thursday, 28 Jan 1999 10:28:38 -0000
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.0124 Re: Spear-shaking


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           (Kirk Hendershott-Kraetzer)
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Date:           Tuesday, 26 Jan 1999 11:04:18 -0500
Subject: 10.0135 Re: Spear-shakin'
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.0135 Re: Spear-shakin'

Jean Peterson writes that

>I thought it was curious that in the last film ("First
>Contact")  the Trek tradition of constant Shakespeare references seemed
>to have been dropped in favor of "Moby Dick."  So is it more harpoons,
>or back to Spear-shakin'?  Just wondering.

This is a casual observation-those more involved with pop culture crit
will probably answer it more fully than I-but the better of the films
(_Wrath of Khan_ and First Contact) have tended to use Great Works of
Western Culture as their basis, though not, to date and to my memory,
and Shakespeare, despite the constant line dropping.  Go figure.

I honestly don't remember any Shakespeare in Insurrection, although I
admit I did spend most of the time thinking, "I wish those rumors about
Alan Rickman as the villain and a plot derived from Heart of Darkness
had been true."

(N.B.  The Undiscovered Country is Star Trek VI; Star Trek IV is the one
about the whales, an interesting bit of slippage that means probably
nothing.)

Kirk

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[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           John Savage <
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Date:           Wednesday, 27 Jan 1999 09:50:05 -0500
Subject: Re: Spear-shaking
Comment:        SHK 10.0124 Re: Spear-shaking

>By the way, can anyone tell me what type of bird is mounted on top of
>Sh's coat of arms (holding another lance)? Is it a phoenix?

Quoted from the Garter King-of-Arms: "...And for his Creast or
Cognizance a falcon."

From "Shakespeare: A Documentary Life," by S. Schoenbaum.

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Robin Hamilton <
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Date:           Thursday, 28 Jan 1999 10:28:38 -0000
Subject: 10.0124 Re: Spear-shaking
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.0124 Re: Spear-shaking

>For what it's worth the late
>Norman MacCaig (a very good Scottish poet) assured me that Shakespeare
>was Scottish.  When I asked how he knew he replied: "The sheer ability
>of the man justifies the assertion".
>John Drakakis

The late Norman MacCaig's slightly younger contemporary and fellow
Scottish poet, Edwin Morgan, discovered even stronger evidence for the
Scottish provenance of Shakespeare, and published this in his _Collected
Translations_ (Carcanet, 1996).

An extract follows:

THE HELL'S-HANDSEL O LEDDY MACBETH

[Macbeth's Castle. Enter Leddy Macbeth, with a letter Macbeth has
scrievit her.]

L.M.

Aye, ye are Glamis, ye are Cawdor, and ae thing mair
ye sail be, ae thing mair.  But och, I traistna
sic herts as yours: sic fouth o mense and cherity:
ower-guid for that undeemous breenge!  Ye'd hae
the gloir, the gree, the tap-rung, but ye want
the malefice the tap-rung taks. Ye'd hae
the pooer, gin pooer cam by prayin; ye carena
for fause pley, but ye'd win whit's no won fair.
Yon thing ye'd hae, gret Clamis, that caas 'Dae this
to hae me, or hae nane' - and then yon thing
that ye mair fear nor hate to dae. Come ye,
come ye, I maun unfauld, maun speak, maun whup
wi this tongue's dauntonin aa thing that hinners
your progress to thon perfit circumgowdie
aa thae wanearthly warnishments and weird
shaw as your croon to be.

[Enter a castle carle.)

                                      Ye bring me news?
 

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