1999

Re: Sheet Music for "Non Nobis"

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.0062  Thursday, 14 January 1999.

[1]     From:   Michael Cohen <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 13 Jan 1999 17:07:51 -0800
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.0054 Sheet Music for "Non Nobis"

[2]     From:   Christine Mack Gordon" <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 13 Jan 1999 20:30:01 -0600
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.0054 Sheet Music for "Non Nobis"


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Michael Cohen <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 13 Jan 1999 17:07:51 -0800
Subject: 10.0054 Sheet Music for "Non Nobis"
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.0054 Sheet Music for "Non Nobis"

>I've been searching, unsuccessfully, for sheet music for the version of
>"Non Nobis" used in Kenneth Branagh's "Henry V".  I assume that this was
>arranged by Patrick Doyle.  If you know where I can find sheet music for
>this version (choral with piano/organ or choral with orchestra), I would
>be quite grateful.

The music for the film was performed by the City of Birmingham Symphony
Orchestra, orchestrated by Lawrence Ashmore, and conducted by Sir Simon
Rattle. The soundtrack recording was published by EMI in 1989. I haven't
been able to find any information about publication of the score; it
might be available from the Renaissance Theatre Company, which produced
the film. EMI is another possibility.

Ellen Edgerton (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.) maintains a rather extensive
Patrick Doyle web page at <http://web.syr.edu:80/~ebedgert/doyle.html>;
she might have some leads as well.

Michael

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Christine Mack Gordon" <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 13 Jan 1999 20:30:01 -0600
Subject: 10.0054 Sheet Music for "Non Nobis"
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.0054 Sheet Music for "Non Nobis"

AIr-Edel (url: http://www.air-edel.co.uk) represents Patrick Doyle; they
might be able to help.

Chris Gordon

Re: A Quick Question

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.0061  Thursday, 14 January 1999.

[1]     From:   Carl Fortunato <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 13 Jan 1999 20:00:02 EST
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.0058 A Quick Question

[2]     From:   Richard Nathan <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 14 Jan 1999 06:07:41 +0000
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.0058 A Quick Question


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Carl Fortunato <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 13 Jan 1999 20:00:02 EST
Subject: 10.0058 A Quick Question
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.0058 A Quick Question


>You say you're interested in Shakespeare trivia questions?  May I
>suggest one?

>It seems obvious that William Shakespeare had a great interest in Italy.
>The following Shakespeare plays have some or all of the action taking
>place in that country.

> ALL'S WELL THAT ENDS WELL, ANTONY AND CLEOPATRA, THE COMEDY OF >ERRORS,
> CORIOLANUS, CYMBELINE, JULIUS CAESAR, THE MERCHANT OF VENICE, MUCH >ADO
> ABOUT NOTHING, OTHELLO, ROMEO AND JULIET, THE TAMING OF THE SHREW, >TITUS
> ANDRONICUS, THE TWO GENTLEMEN OF VERONA, THE WINTER'S TALE.

H'mm.  Seems to me there's one play that doesn't belong in the above
list.

 Which play?

Might you be thinking of "Comedy of Errors," which actually takes place
in Sicily, not Italy?

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Richard Nathan <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 14 Jan 1999 06:07:41 +0000
Subject: 10.0058 A Quick Question
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.0058 A Quick Question

"COMEDY OF ERRORS" actually occurs in Italy, although characters on the
stage refer to events which took place in Italy.

Re: Shakespeare in Love

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.0059  Wednesday, 13 January 1999.

From:           Bruce Young <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 13 Jan 1999 10:27:07 +0000
Subject: 10.0033 Re: Shakespeare in Love
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.0033 Re: Shakespeare in Love

It's interesting to see how every age and persuasion is inclined to
remake Shakespeare in their image.  So I guess it's not surprising that
he's now been compared with the current U.S. president.  (I'm wondering
if we should brace ourselves soon for a comparison with Leonardo di
Caprio or the members of 'N Sync-but maybe list members are still a bit
too stodgy for that.)

I think more interesting comparisons could be made between the president
and some of Shakespeare's characters, such as Bertram in All's Well.

Here is just one quotation among many that could be used in making such
a comparison (the last scene of the play is also rich in parallels).
Bertram's companions are reflecting on his sexual escapades and his lack
of regard for his wife:

<[2. Lord.]> . . .  The great dignity that his
valor hath here acquir'd for him shall at home be
encount'red with a shame as ample.
<[1. Lord.]> The web of our life is of a mingled yarn,
good and ill together: our virtues would be proud, if
our faults whipt them not, and our crimes would
despair, if they were not cherish'd by our virtues.
    (All's Well That Ends Well  4.3.68-74)

I believe this (along with many other passages) shows that Shakespeare's
often noted tolerance is not quite as mindless as some suggest.
Certainly, he's not narrowly judgmental, but much of what I like to
consider Shakespeare's greatness lies in how he combines compassion and
understanding with moral insight and evaluation.

Re: Psalm 46

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.0060  Thursday, 14 January 1999.

[1]     From:   Joanne Whalen <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 13 Jan 1999 19:41:29 EST
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.0055 Re: Psalm 46

[2]     From:   Larry Weiss This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 14 Jan 1999 00:7:32 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.0055 Re: Psalm 46

[3]     From:   Clifford Stetner <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 14 Jan 1999 05:33:43 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.0055 Re: Psalm 46


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Joanne Whalen <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 13 Jan 1999 19:41:29 EST
Subject: 10.0055 Re: Psalm 46
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.0055 Re: Psalm 46

Mike Jensen wrote:

>put a steak through the heart of this discussion. . .

Would he like that rare or medium?

Joanne

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Larry Weiss <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 14 Jan 1999 00:37:32 -0500
Subject: 10.0055 Re: Psalm 46
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.0055 Re: Psalm 46

Mike Jensen wrote:

> Last year someone posted a learned message about the translation team of
> the KJV, naming names, criteria for being on the team, etc.  I wish I
> could remember who, for he (I think it was a man) deserves much credit.
> Will someone please repost that and put a steak through the heart of the
> current discussion before it gets any sillier.

At the risk of making it even sillier, permit me to point out that, even
giving justifiable concern to the ravages of cholesterol, a stake is
more acutely dangerous to the heart than a steak.

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Clifford Stetner <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 14 Jan 1999 05:33:43 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 10.0055 Re: Psalm 46
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.0055 Re: Psalm 46

You're all missing the obvious truth. It was not the translator(s) of
the Psalms, but the Author who was really responsible for the word
arrangement. When God inspired David (?) to compose the original Hebrew,
He knew that it would be translated in the 46th year of Shakespeare's
life into this arrangement of English.  This is a sign that Shakespeare
is one of His true saints.  We should call the Pope immediately.

Selah

Clifford Stetner

A Quick Question

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.0058  Wednesday, 13 January 1999.

From:           John Savage <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 13 Jan 1999 16:22:24 -0500
Subject:        A Quick Question

You say you're interested in Shakespeare trivia questions?  May I
suggest one?

It seems obvious that William Shakespeare had a great interest in Italy.
The following Shakespeare plays have some or all of the action taking
place in that country.

ALL'S WELL THAT ENDS WELL, ANTONY AND CLEOPATRA, THE COMEDY OF ERRORS,
CORIOLANUS, CYMBELINE, JULIUS CAESAR, THE MERCHANT OF VENICE, MUCH ADO
ABOUT NOTHING, OTHELLO, ROMEO AND JULIET, THE TAMING OF THE SHREW, TITUS
ANDRONICUS, THE TWO GENTLEMEN OF VERONA, THE WINTER'S TALE.

H'mm.  Seems to me there's one play that doesn't belong in the above
list.

Which play?

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