1999

Shakespeare Section

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.0022  Tuesday, 6 January 1999.

From:           John Savage <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 5 Jan 1999 15:05:59 -0500
Subject:        Shakespeare Section

Dear SHAKSPERean:

I thought you might like to know that CompuServe has a Shakespeare
Section.

This is an electronic meeting-place where people from all over get
together on a daily basis for fairly lighthearted discussion of the
Bard- the Shakespeare plays, as well as his life and times.

Available to CompuServe members, it's in their Living History Forum (GO
LIVING).  Drop by and say hello!

   Yours, John Savage

Richard III

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.0021  Tuesday, 6 January 1999.

From:           Marion K Morford <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 5 Jan 1999 19:07:10 +0000
Subject:        Richard III

I was just sorting through my basement collection of books and found a
copy of Richard III edited by Rev. Henry Hudson, published in 1885 "for
use in schools and families." It is in quite good shape and is inscribed
for high school 1886. Anyone interested?

THE KNIGHT OF THE BURNING PESTLE

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.0019  Tuesday, 6 January 1999.

From:           The Shenandoah Shakespeare Express <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 5 Jan 1999 13:10:10 EST
Subject:        THE KNIGHT OF THE BURNING PESTLE

Special Invitation for Readers at the Folger Shakespeare Library The
Shenandoah Shakespeare Express will offer a private, preview performance
of Francis Beaumont's THE KNIGHT OF THE BURNING PESTLE (directed by
Ralph Alan Cohen, SSE Executive Director and Shakespeare Professor at
James Madison University) for Folger staff and Folger readers on
Saturday January 23rd at 7 pm in the Elizabethan Theatre.  Doors will
open at 6:30 pm.  Contact the SSE at 1-800-434-7484 for details.

From the Director:

"If Pirandello, the Marx brothers, and Shakespeare had gotten together
to write a play, this is what they would have written." - Ralph Cohen

Re: Ghost from Purgatory

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.0020  Tuesday, 6 January 1999.

From:           David Evett <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 05 Jan 1999 16:09:38 -0500
Subject: 9.1324  Re: Ghost from Purgatory
Comment:        Re: SHK 9.1324  Re: Ghost from Purgatory

This thread having knit itself into a general consideration of the
sacerdotal aspects of early modern theater, let me say first that I
would like very much to hear from somebody who knows a lot more than I
do about actual English liturgical practice than I do, in presumptively
put-on-the-dog places like cathedrals and the Chapel Royal but also in
ordinary neighborhood or village parish churches, and in both pre- and
post-Reformation Tudor England.

I would comment that although Protestant iconoclasm left Anglican
services less visually splendid than their Catholic precursors, such
dramatic elements as they possessed would have been verbally enhanced
for all those worshippers who did not understand spoken or sung Latin.
Cranmer had a more than adequate sense of dramatic construction, I
think; as a theater-lover who is also a regular Anglican churchgoer I
find plenty of drama (whatever it is I mean by that) not only in Holy
Communion-especially at the grand feasts, Christmas, Easter, and
Pentecost-but in the services on special occasions-Baptism,
Confirmation, Marriage, the Churching of Women, Ordination, Burial, plus
things like the Great Litany done within other services.

Sacerdotally,
Dave Evett

Re: Literature, Music, Meaning

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.0018  Tuesday, 6 January 1999.

From:           Catherine Fitzmaurice <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 5 Jan 1999 11:37:52 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 10.0007  Re: Literature, Music, Meaning
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.0007  Re: Literature, Music, Meaning

What about the "music" of spoken language? would Gabriel Egan deny
"meaning" to the intonations, inflections, stresses, volumes,
intensities, rhythms and rates of that? Consider the "langue" of
paralinguistics. Also semiotics does indeed precisely allow imagistic,
as opposed to only linear verbal, thinking. My article "Breathing is
Meaning" places meaning squarely in a phenomenological relation to the
individual speaker and hearer.

The deafness of emotional parsimony is the breeding ground of postmodern
irony, not in its surrealism but in its sarcasm.

Catherine Fitzmaurice
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

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