1999

Norton CD-ROM

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.0143  Thursday, 28 January 1999.

From:           David J. Schalkwyk <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 26 Jan 1999 09:14:50 -0600
Subject:        Norton CD-ROM

I've just moved from sunny Cape Town to frozen Madison for 1999 and need
to buy a complete Shakespeare.  Does anyone know anything about the
Norton CD-ROM?  I already have the Andromeda CD which contains the
Oxford text.  Would the Norton (also the Oxford text) offer significant
benefits as far as ease of use is concerned?

Thanks
David Schalkwyk

Re: Editions

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.0142  Thursday, 28 January 1999.

From:           Michael Ullyot <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 26 Jan 1999 14:44:44 +0000
Subject: 10.0132 Re: Editions
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.0132 Re: Editions

I'd like to thank those who wrote in with their observations on
Shakespeare editions. A few notes and queries:

Roy Flannagan writes:
"there is a future for the old-spelling edition, but I would add that
Shakespeare seems to be a special case, because [...] modern popular or
undergraduate readers might not want the scholarly challenge or strain
of reading Shakespeare even as he is on the page of the First Folio...I
still think I would argue that any complete edition of Shakespeare
published for general academic use today should be based on a modernized
text."

You are right to suggest that first-time readers neither need nor desire
old-spelling editions-but what I wonder is why these editions are so
rare. Lest the Penguin Renaissance Dramatists series does one of the
plays of Shakespeare (an unlikely feat, considering the project has just
been cancelled "due to an absence of market demand"), we have no readily
available, paperback editions of his plays, complete with scholarly
apparatus. Even the Penguin series was unfortunately inadequate in that
way, presenting the usual glosses to "hard words" and a sketchy
introduction, but nowhere approaching the comprehensiveness of the Arden
editions. The Variorum editions do employ the spellings of the quarto
and folio editions of individual plays, but could hardly be called
either readily available or scholarly current.

I do appreciate the difficulty of reading Shakespeare, particularly in
one's first encounter with a given play, which is why I do not argue for
an abolition of modernised texts. Just the existence of an alternative.
Why not have a series of the quality of Arden, in early modern English,
for those who want it? Despite the market forces against it, as they
often are against worthwhile endeavours.

Rick Beato adds:
"As a high school teacher, I find the Cambridge School Shakespeare
series, [...] to be especially valuable."

From personal recollection in learning Shakespeare, I must agree that
either the Oxford or Cambridge (or other similar series) School
Shakespeare editions are wonderful for one's first encounter with the
text. Even the illustrations, I remember from the first time I read
Macbeth, were helpful to visualise what exactly was being described, or
where the action was taking place.

But (not to be excessively pedantic), what of old spelling editions? Do
they truly serve no scholarly purpose, as their absence from recent
scholarly endeavour would suggest? Or is this simply a question of
outnumbering: those who are buying Shakespeare editions in droves are
students in introductory courses, not single academics. I would suggest
that it is time for professors and teachers to perhaps overestimate the
intelligence of their students, and have at least one early modern
English edition on their reading lists. The Penguin series (what remains
of it) is an excellent start for non-Shakespeare. If anyone is aware of
old-spelling editions of Shakespeare, readily and cheaply available, I
would be buoyed to know of them.

Syncerlye,
Michael Ullyot

Macbeth Spin-Off

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.0140  Tuesday, 26 January 1999.

From:           Richard A Burt <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 25 Jan 1999 19:19:33 -0500 (EST)
Subject:        Macbeth Spin-Off

There's a new porn spin-off of Macbeth out entitled In the Flesh.  It's
on the cover of the Jan 1999 issue of AVN:  "Shakespeare in Lust:  Kylie
Ireland and VCA Revamp the Bard for In the Flesh."  The focus is
apparently on Lady M.  Produced by VCA.  Dir. by Antonio Passolini and
Stuart Canterbury.  It's set in a castle in Budapest.

Globe Season

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.0141  Tuesday, 26 January 1999.

From:           Jerry Bangham <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 25 Jan 1999 20:25:28 -0600
Subject:        Globe Season

>From The Mining Company's British Theatre Connection:

Two all-male Shakespeares in Globe summer season Shakespeare's Globe
summer season this year will feature an all-male Julius Caesar (opening
20th May) and an all-male Antony and Cleopatra (opening 30th July), in
which Globe director Mark Rylance will play Cleopatra.

Also in the season is A Comedy of Errors (cast normally), which opens on
3rd June and a new play by Peter Oswald, specially commissioned for the
Globe, Augustine's Oak, which deals with St Augustine's visit to Britain
to convert the pagans and re-unite the Celtic and Roman churches.

Jerry Bangham            http:/www.win.net/~kudzu

Re: SSE's Knight of the Burning Pestle

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.0139  Tuesday, 26 January 1999.

[1]     From:   Melissa Cook <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 25 Jan 1999 09:59:08 -0800 (PST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.0130 The Knight of the Burning Pestle and SSE News

[2]     From:   Robin Hamilton <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 25 Jan 1999 19:28:34 -0000
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.0130 The Knight of the Burning Pestle and SSE News


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Melissa Cook <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 25 Jan 1999 09:59:08 -0800 (PST)
Subject: 10.0130 The Knight of the Burning Pestle and SSE News
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.0130 The Knight of the Burning Pestle and SSE News

I just wanted to add my compliments to the SSE.  I too saw the show and
it was wonderful.  These people bring vitality, enthusiasm, and humor
which is unmatched by any other troupe I've seen.  And for their first
non-Shakespeare related play "The Knight of the Burning Pestle" was
wonderful and, as Dr. Cohen mentioned in the program, very fit for a
modern audience.  In fact I think I've sat in front of some of those
characters at the movies.  All right I'm done with my praise now.  Carry
on.

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Robin Hamilton <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 25 Jan 1999 19:28:34 -0000
Subject: 10.0130 The Knight of the Burning Pestle and SSE News
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.0130 The Knight of the Burning Pestle and SSE News

>Francis Beaumont's play about plays is as "modern" as
>Shakespeare in Love. Indeed, if Luigi Pirandello, the Marx Brothers, and
>William Shakespeare had collaborated on a play, they might have written
>The Knight of the Burning Pestle."

It's slightly off the point, but it's struck me that Shakespeare
analogises to Brecht in terms of dramatic technique (deliberate
foregrounding of the fictionality of plays [word chosen to avoid the
drama/theatre dispute!]) while Jonson links in with Pirandello, blurring
the boundaries.  Bartholomew Fair begins like Six Characters under any
other name.

In these terms, Beaumont would be Alan Ayckbourne and Webster maybe Tom
Stoppard.

Hm?

Robin Hamilton

Subscribe to Our Feeds

Search

Make a Gift to SHAKSPER

Consider making a gift to support SHAKSPER.