1999

Rare Book School 1999

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.0603  Wednesday, 31 March 1999.

From:           Book Arts Press <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 30 Mar 1999 16:13:17 -0500
Subject:        Rare Book School 1999


RARE BOOK SCHOOL 1999 (RBS): Rare Book School is pleased to announce its
schedule of courses for the summer of 1999, consisting of 27 five-day,
non-credit courses on topics concerning the history of books and
printing, manuscripts, and special collections, to be offered on the
grounds of the University of Virginia 12 July - 6 August.  Tuition per
course for the RBS 1999 Summer Session is $640.  The complete brochure,
expanded course descriptions, and applications are available at our
website:

  <http://www.virginia.edu/oldbooks>

Readers of SHAKSPER may find the courses featured below to be of
particular interest:

27. ELECTRONIC TEXTS AND IMAGES.

A practical exploration of the research, preservation, editing, and
pedagogical uses of electronic texts and images in the humanities. The
course will center around the creation of a set of archival-quality
etexts and digital images, for which we shall also create an Encoded
Archival Description guide. Topics include: SGML tagging and conversion;
using the Text Encoding Initiative Guidelines; the form and implications
of XML; publishing on the World Wide Web; and the management and use of
on-line texts. See for details about last year's course. Some experience
with HTML is a pre-requisite for admission to the course. Offered in
both weeks 2 and 4. Instructor: David Seaman.

DAVID SEAMAN is the founding director of the nationally-known Electronic
Text Center and on-line archive at the University of Virginia. He
lectures and writes frequently on SGML, the Internet, and the creation
and use of electronic texts in the humanities.

45. INTRODUCTION TO DESCRIPTIVE BIBLIOGRAPHY.

An introduction to the physical examination and description of printed
books, especially of the period 1550-1875. Designed both for those with
little previous formal exposure to this subject and for those with some
general knowledge of the field who wish to be presented with a
systematic discussion of the elements of physical description. A major
part of the course will consist of small, closely supervised laboratory
sessions in which students will gain practice in determining format and
collation and in writing standard descriptions of signings and
pagination. In daily museum sessions, students will have the opportunity
to see a wide variety of printed books drawn from the extensive Book
Arts Press laboratory collections. Instructors: Terry Belanger and
Richard Noble.

TERRY BELANGER founded RBS in 1983 at Columbia University. Since 1992,
he has been University Professor and Honorary Curator of Special
Collections at the University of Virginia.

Book Arts Press                      ph: 804/924-8851
114 Alderman Library                fax: 804/924-8824
University of Virginia            email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Charlottesville, VA  22903 website: <http://www.virginia.edu/oldbooks>

Winter '99 Issue of Shakespeare Bulletin

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.0602  Wednesday, 31 March 1999.

From:           James P. Lusardi <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 30 Mar 1999 15:29:03 -0500 (CDT)
Subject:        Winter '99 Issue of Shakespeare Bulletin

For those who don't know or don't subscribe to Shakespeare Bulletin, a
Journal of Performance Criticism and Scholarship (now in its 17th year).

The Winter 1999 issue (17.1) is off the press.  This issue features
International Shakespeare.  Contents:

Alan C. Dessen on "Choices and Changes" in 1998 productions of
Shakespeare and his contemporaries.

James Loehlin on producing the First Quarto Hamlet at the New Globe.

Jane Collins' interview with South African director James Whyle on
staging Shakespeare after apartheid.

In the section "Shakespeare on Film," H. R. Coursen's overview of the
recent Shakespeare films.

In addition to covering fourteen productions in the UK, the issue offers
reviews of French, Lithuanian, Finnish, Estonian, Dutch, Australian,
Taiwanese, and Japanese productions.

As usual, the issue also includes production photos and illustrations,
book reviews, and a listing of Events.

SB remains a great bargain among journals:  $15 (US) for one year (4
48-page issues), $30 for two years, etc.  No surcharge for mailing to
overseas subscribers.  Back issues available @ $4.

Make out check or money order (no credit cards) to Shakespeare
Bulletin.  Send to J. P. Lusardi and J. Schlueter, Co-Editors,
Shakespeare Bulletin, Lafayette College, Easton, PA 18042.  Phone:
(610) 330-5245, fax: (610) 330-5606, e-mail:  This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

Re: Elizabeth's Nicknames

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.0600  Wednesday, 31 March 1999.

[1]     From:   Frank Whigham <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 30 Mar 1999 10:55:26 -0800
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.0583 Re: Elizabeth's Nicknames

[2]     From:   Robin Hamilton <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 30 Mar 1999 19:49:47 +0100
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.0583 Re: Elizabeth's Nicknames

[3]     From:   Stephanie Hughes <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 30 Mar 1999 07:51:32 +0000
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.058 Re: Elizabeth's Nicknames


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Frank Whigham <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 30 Mar 1999 10:55:26 -0800
Subject: 10.0583 Re: Elizabeth's Nicknames
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.0583 Re: Elizabeth's Nicknames

Many thanks to Carol Barton for her citations.

I think there's more to say. It's a tricky matter to complain on a list
that serves several different kinds of purposes for different
participants, but I think it's important to say that many tales get told
about our common subject, by novelists, scholars, biographers, and
others, that don't stand up very well to questions about documentation.
We only need look at the recent films about Shakespeare and Elizabeth to
watch how fictions can find their way into the mind as "history" (if
fears about what students will make of these movies have any
justification at all). I'm extremely interested in Elizabethan popular
culture(s), esp. those that emanate from the scene of the court (or the
court as envisioned by those near but not at it), and have some
experience in the difficulty of rooting up anything like original
documentation. Lots of this material is preserved in letter collections
and other such sources, difficult of access and ill-indexed if at all. I
understand too about answering email while away from one's books, and
about not wanting to burden the list.

However, I also think about the flood of dubious data published (but
often not peer-reviewed) on the net. Just as there's a place for SIL, so
too there is a place for careful scholarship (as the recent Miola case
shows, to put it very mildly). This list is for both purposes, right?
(This is peer review.) I think that many listmembers are precisely
interested in the specific history of such tales (often providing it),
and would welcome hard data (though I can certainly see an argument for
keeping your material to yourself if you're aiming for publication and
need it a lot, as any junior scholar must). Many reviewers have raised a
lot of hell about the new-historical use of the anecdote. If anecdotes
are to get tested properly, if they are to earn legitimately what folks
use them for in scholarship, strong documentation is essential. The
Elizabeth nicknames discussion seems to me a prime specimen of the
anecdotal. People like me who work a lot with the anecdotal need to be
especially careful.

Speaking for myself, I am pretty reluctant to accept undocumented
"factual" statements by biographers, even well-placed ones such as
Neville Williams. Everyone knows how oft-repeated dicta can get morphed
beyond recognition, esp. in biographies based on a long string of
predecessors and shooting for a popular audience. Williams makes for
fascinating reading, but is cavalier about notes, and this produces both
envy (of his sources) and suspicion-or at least wariness-in me, at least
if I'm thinking about using the item in teaching or writing.

Obviously, popular-oriented scholars are often very smart and say many
useful things. (We professionalist scholars-for want of a better term-
certainly have things to learn from them, not least in presenting our
own field(s) of study as not just stupidly esoteric, the sort of
caricatures the NY Times loves to carp about.) Nonetheless, I think it's
fair to subject the reports of such tales to the same criteria we'd use
in evaluating a grad seminar paper, say, and I'd certainly say to such a
student writer about Elizabeth's nicknames, "how do you know?" If the
burden of proof lies on those who assert, then our list's discussion
about which (if any) of Elizabeth's "men" got called her "moor" (what a
fascinating detail) needs more data. Just because Williams is popular
(that is, undocumented) doesn't make him wrong, but neither does it make
him right. Whichever he may be (and maybe the terms are wrong, or maybe
we can't decide), at least we can go look at what he says and how he
says it, and think about it. This is an important start.

One more thing. The sources for the study of our period are many and
long and thick. One can't simply "go look it up" easily. All of us have
read differently, and different things. That's at least one reason why
page numbers and other clues are so precious.

Anyway, thanks again for your response, Carol.

Frank Whigham

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Robin Hamilton <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 30 Mar 1999 19:49:47 +0100
Subject: 10.0583 Re: Elizabeth's Nicknames
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.0583 Re: Elizabeth's Nicknames

>My frog is from the Frog Prince fairy tale

The Frog Prince is from the brothers Grimm's collection, and I don't
+think+ existed, even in analogue form, in England that early.

Robin Hamilton

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Stephanie Hughes <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 30 Mar 1999 07:51:32 +0000
Subject: 10.058 Re: Elizabeth's Nicknames
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.058 Re: Elizabeth's Nicknames

>Just a random suggestion as to what 'spirit' may have meant in reference
> to Burghley.  Wouldn't that nickname refer to his all-seeing eye in the
> kingdom, i.e. to some ubiquitous network of spies ?
>
> Francois Laroque

She called Leicester her "Eyes" and Hatton her "Lids." The first
suggests spying, or knowing all, the second might suggest keeping such
knowledge private. Hatton did function for the Queen as an agent in
Parliament; he portrayed himself as her knight, which would mean
possibly carrying out private missions of various sorts. She called
Raleigh her "Oracle," which also suggests knowledge of matters beyond
ordinary ken. Francois suggests that Burghley's nickname may have had
the same intent, an intriguing suggestion, as it could mean that all
four of these nicknames were aimed at encouraging these important men to
keep her informed.

>Spiritus in Latin means "inspiration."
>According to Richard A. Spears' "Slang and Euphemism," spirit in the
>1600s meant "semen," "mettle," "spunk."
>I guess he bucked up her courage when she needed it.

Actually, his unhappy job was often to frighten her by reporting to her
all the conspiracies that he saw forming against her, or thought he
saw.  He had to talk her into doing things she didn't want to do, like
sign the death warrants for members of her family, and stop her from
doing the things she did want to do, like marry Leicester.  There's no
doubt but she frequently saw him as a kill joy. (Somehow I doubt that
"semen" had much to do with it.)

Again, I think it would be helpful to know when she used these names.
Was such naming something that went on for a long time? Her entire
reign? Or just for a few years, perhaps during her spirited youth? Thus
the intent of the names might be associated more closely with a certain
period of her life, of history, and that might be more to the point than
her personal feelings towards the individual, or at least as relevant.

Stephanie Hughes

Re: SSE; Isabella; Poetry

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.0601  Wednesday, 31 March 1999.

[1]     From:   David Maier <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 30 Mar 1999 11:05:20 -0800
        Subj:   RE: SHK 10.0579 Shenandoah Shakespeare Express

[2]     From:   Ed Pixley <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 30 Mar 1999 16:14:59 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.0517 Isabella's Role in Measure for Measure

[3]     From:   Roger Gross <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 30 Mar 1999 19:30:39 -0600 (CST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.0561 Re: A Question about poetry


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           David Maier <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 30 Mar 1999 11:05:20 -0800
Subject: 10.0579 Shenandoah Shakespeare Express
Comment:        RE: SHK 10.0579 Shenandoah Shakespeare Express

Love the titles they've given to their tours...

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Ed Pixley <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 30 Mar 1999 16:14:59 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: 10.0517 Isabella's Role in Measure for Measure
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.0517 Isabella's Role in Measure for Measure

>I am writing a reduced text of Measure for Measure for my Shakespeare
>class at Bethel College. I want my text to focus on how Isabella's
>virtue remains intact, despite being constantly attacked throughout the
>play.  The goal is to create a feeling of sympathy for Isabella, as well
>as admiration. These emotions are much more difficult to feel when
>watching or reading the entire play.

I didn't respond immediately because I assumed several others would. But
in checking ahead, I don't spot any reactions.  If I missed them, and if
this has already been discussed adequately, I apologize.

Your own statement, "These emotions are much more difficult to feel when
watching or reading the entire play," should give a clue as to the
appropriateness of this approach if your intention is to better
understand the play that Shakespeare wrote.  If you have some other
intention, perhaps your reduced version ought to go under a different
title and authorship.  I think most of us in theater still adhere to the
principle of unity of action, so that to take one thread out of a play,
eliminating the context of the whole, will result in a distortion of the
implied intention of the work of art.

Ed Pixley
SUNY-Oneonta

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Roger Gross <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 30 Mar 1999 19:30:39 -0600 (CST)
Subject: 10.0561 Re: A Question about poetry
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.0561 Re: A Question about poetry

Robin Hamilton kindly supplies the name of a Marina Tarlinskaja book I
couldn't recall.  It is a good book but it is not the one I was thinking
of.  I was trying to recall the title of a more recent work and now I
have it:

Marina Tarlinskaja,  Shakespeare's Verse: iambic pentameter and the
poet's idiosyncracies, NY: Peter Lang, 1987.

I would quibble with a bit of it but it's fundamentally very good and
valuable.  (You may well ask 'who wouldn't I quibble with.'  Right.)

Roger Gross
U. of Arkansas

Re: Polonius and Kate

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.0599  Wednesday, 31 March 1999.

[1]     From:   Clifford Stetner <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 30 Mar 1999 13:32:10 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.0584 Polonius and Kate

[2]     From:   Andy White <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 30 Mar 1999 20:23:44 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.0584 Polonius and Kate


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Clifford Stetner <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 30 Mar 1999 13:32:10 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 10.0584 Polonius and Kate
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.0584 Polonius and Kate

This is further evidence that Hamlet ain't such a prize as princes go.
He does the same thing to Osric: it's hot, it's cold.  What is used by
Petruchio to demonstrate the proper obsequiousness of subaltern to
sovereign (the family followed the same principles as the state in the
Renaissance thinking represented here), is used by Hamlet as a cause for
ridicule.  Polonius is subject to the same motivation as Kate: to please
his lord as a faithful servant should.  But Hamlet, while wielding the
power of life and death over those around them, holds them in contempt
for declining to displease him by arguing trivial points.  He is
Shakespeare's representation of an Elizabethan sociopath.

Clifford Stetner

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Andy White <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 30 Mar 1999 20:23:44 -0500
Subject: 10.0584 Polonius and Kate
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.0584 Polonius and Kate

Actually, I tend to see these two scenes differently; Hamlet imposes on
Polonius because court etiquette requires Polonius agree with anything
his betters say-even if his betters are clearly nuts.

In the same vein, Petruchio's sun/moon bit with Kate seems to be his
attempt to get her to treat him like royalty, to agree with everything
he says, for no other reason than that he said it.  Kate finally agrees
to this, but not before turning the tables on her hubby, as I recall...
it seems to me that Polonius isn't the crazy one, he's sane but stuck in
an absurd situation.  Ditto, even more so, for Kate.

Andy White
Arlington,VA

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