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Home :: Archive :: 1999 :: March ::
Rosenbach Lectures in Bibliography
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.0338  Monday 1 March 1999.

From:           Daniel Traister <
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Date:           Saturday, 27 Feb 1999 12:31:40 -0500 (EST)
Subject:        Rosenbach Lectures in Bibliography

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The 1999 Rosenbach Lectures in Bibliography will be presented in the
Lessing J. Rosenwald Gallery, 6th floor, Van Pelt-Dietrich Library,
University of Pennsylvania (*NOT* the Rosenbach Museum and Library!).
The address is 3420 Walnut Street (entrance on Locust Walk, at the
statue of the broken button), Philadelphia, PA. This year's Fellow,
Brian Stock (University of Toronto), presents three lectures under the
general title of "Minds, Bodies, Readers":

        Tuesday, 23 March:
        Healing, Meditation, and the History of Reading

        Wednesday, 24 March:
        Healers without Books, Readers without Souls

        Thursday, March 25:
        Clinical Therapies, Readerly Mentalities

Each lecture starts at 5.30 P.M. Receptions will follow each lecture.

Professor Stock addresses in this series the relationship between the
mind-body dualism in western medicine and the history of reading in the
early modern era. The bridge between the two is the practice of
thera-peutic meditation as a function of reading, a tradition with deep
classical and medieval roots. Its techniques were changed or abandoned
altogether by the seventeenth century and not recovered again until
relatively recently. Professor Stock's lectures explore the implications
of these changes and their consequences today.

Professor Stock's genuinely foundational writings include *The
Implica-tions of Literacy* (Princeton 1983), acclaimed by Walter Ong as
"a major seminal work" that "shows how in a deep sense the Middle Ages
was by far the most literate period that Western culture has ever
known." Other recent books include Listening for the Text: On the Uses
of the Past (Hopkins 1990) and Augustine the Reader (Harvard 1996).

For further information, contact

        
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Daniel Traister
Walter H. and Leonore Annenberg Rare Book and Manuscript Library
Van Pelt-Dietrich Library, University of Pennsylvania
 

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