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Home :: Archive :: 1999 :: March ::
Re: Ozymandias
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.041  Tuesday 2 March 1999.

[1]     From:   Carol Barton <
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        Date:   Monday, 1 Mar 1999 09:03:54 EST
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.0326 Re: Ozymandias

[2]     From:   Robin Hamilton <
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        Date:   Monday, 1 Mar 1999 19:22:05 -0000
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.0326 Re: Ozymandias

[3]     From:   Richard J Kennedy <
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        Date:   Monday, 1 Mar 1999 20:23:11 -0800 (PST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.0326 Re: Ozymandias

[4]     From:   Nancy Charlton <
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        Date:   Monday, 01 Mar 1999 23:20:30 -0800
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.0321 Re: Ozymandias


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Carol Barton <
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Date:           Monday, 1 Mar 1999 09:03:54 EST
Subject: 10.0326 Re: Ozymandias
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.0326 Re: Ozymandias

>Another English poet, of course, remarked that:

>Not marble, nor the gilded monuments
>Of princes, shall outlive this powerful rhyme;
>But you shall shine more bright in these contents
>Than unswept stone besmear'd with sluttish time.
>When wasteful war shall statues overturn,
>And broils root out the work of masonry,
>Nor Mars his sword nor war's quick fire shall burn
>The living record of your memory.
>'Gainst death and all-oblivious enmity
>Shall you pace forth; your praise shall still find room
>Even in the eyes of all posterity
>That wear this world out to the ending doom.
>So, till the judgment that yourself arise,
>You live in this, and dwell in lover's eyes.

>Cheers,
>Skip Nicholson
>South Pasadena (CA) HS
>
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You mean "so long lives this, and this gives life to thee"?

Carol Barton

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Robin Hamilton <
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Date:           Monday, 1 Mar 1999 19:22:05 -0000
Subject: 10.0326 Re: Ozymandias
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.0326 Re: Ozymandias

>Another English poet, of course, remarked that:
>
>Not marble, nor the gilded monuments
>Of princes, shall outlive this powerful rhyme;
>
>Skip Nicholson

But he also said in 81:

Your name from hence immortall life shall haue,
Though I (once gone) to all the world must dye,

Shame Bill forgot to mention what it was, but then it's always the
artists rather than the subjects who win out in the end.

There's also a poem by Hugh MacDiarmid that's apposite:

               The Eeneis Stane

I' the how-dumb-deid o' the cauld hairst nicht
The warl' like an eemis stane
Wags i' the lift;
An' my eerie memories fa'
Like a yowdendrift.

Like a yowdendrift so's I couldna read
The words cut ooti' the stane
Had the fug o' fame
An' history's hazeiraw
No' yirdit thaim.

-- Robin Hamilton

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Richard J Kennedy <
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Date:           Monday, 1 Mar 1999 20:23:11 -0800 (PST)
Subject: 10.0326 Re: Ozymandias
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.0326 Re: Ozymandias

If no one has mentioned it, a week or two ago cartoon in the New Yorker,
by Booth: A under the street worker is arising from his manhole and
proclaiming to the world at large:

"My name is Ozymandias...look on my works..." etc.

[4]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Nancy Charlton <
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Date:           Monday, 01 Mar 1999 23:20:30 -0800
Subject: 10.0321 Re: Ozymandias
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.0321 Re: Ozymandias

I never in all my life thought of this before, but could it be that the
"traveler from an antique land" was traveling in time as well as-or
instead of-space?  If so, he may be describing the statue as already
ruined in a time still ancient to Shelley.  That is why "nothing beside
remains" and why the "lone and level sands stretch far away."  So then,
is the traveler saying the enduring aspect of King of Kings is the
"sneer of cold command," i.e., that the psychological verities of human
nature outlive all statecraft and power?  That they require the medium
of art to maintain their immortality?

Further, I can't help but notice the difference in tone between this and
"Not marble, nor the gilded monuments."  Ozymandias leaves you with a
negation; Shakespeare's tribute "'gainst death and all-oblivious enmity"
establishes love as the constant and immortal affirmation.  Ozymandias
Rex had no love?

Nah -- that's too simple!

Nancy Charlton
Portland OR

P.S.  "King of Kings" was also the appellation of Agamemnon.  Since this
name is of Egyptian origin, could Ozymandias/Rameses also be an oblique
reference to that particular classical can of worms?
 

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