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Home :: Archive :: 1999 :: March ::
Re: Witches; Ven.; Bloom; Lust; Ozymandias
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.0353  Wednesday 3 March 1999.

[1]     From:   John Savage <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 2 Mar 1999 09:45:18 -0500
        Subj:   SHK 10.0327 Re: Witches

[2]     From:   Hardy M. Cook <
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        Date:   Tuesday, March 2, 1999
        Subj:   Re: The Early Reception of Venus and Adonis

[3]     From:   Judy Kennedy <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 2 Mar 1999 09:54:27 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Bloom's Book

[4]     From:   Paul S. Rhodes <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 3 Mar 1999 00:46:51 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.0346 Re: R&J in Lust

[5]     From:   Robin Hamilton <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 2 Mar 1999 13:40:25 -0000
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.041 Re: Ozymandias


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           John Savage <
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Date:           Tuesday, 2 Mar 1999 09:45:18 -0500
Subject: Re: Witches
Comment:        SHK 10.0327 Re: Witches

>One of them was bare chested, and in the
>prophecy scene the images from the future were flashed off his/her chest
>as if it were a film screening.

   Undoubtedly where the Teletubbies came from...  <g>

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Hardy M. Cook <
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Date:           Tuesday, March 2, 1999
Subject:        Re: The Early Reception of Venus and Adonis

Philip C. Kolin in his introduction to the Garland collection of
critical essay on Venus and Adonis offers the following about the early
reception of this narrative poem:

        "As the seventeenth century progressed, the eroticism increased as the
enchantment waned. The reputation of Venus and Adonis changed, in
general, from that of being an immortal love poem to that of a bawdy
tale relished by wastrels and rebuked by moralists. The poem kept
company with tapsters, courtesans, and roues. Venus became a poem that
lived in naughtiness. The Shakespeare Allusion-Book, edited by John
Munro, contains 61 references to Venus from the late 1590s through 1700.
As the allusions below testify, Venus was widely known and read in
Jacobean and Carolingian England. While some of these allusions are
flattering, or at least neutral, many more are negative, charting the
fall in esteem of Shakespeare's highly embellished poem. References to
the poem's immorality in The Shakespeare Allusion-Book might be divided
conveniently into two groups-those in moral tracts and those in the
drama." (10)

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Judy Kennedy <
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Date:           Tuesday, 2 Mar 1999 09:54:27 -0500 (EST)
Subject:        Bloom's Book

There is an entertaining review by John Carey of Bloom on Shakespeare,
in The Sunday Times for February 28.  It could, I think, usefully be
recommended to any readers inclined to give uncritical credence to
well-known best-selling names.

        www.sunday-times.co.uk

under Books.

Judy Kennedy

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[4]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Paul S. Rhodes <
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Date:           Wednesday, 3 Mar 1999 00:46:51 -0500
Subject: 10.0346 Re: R&J in Lust
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.0346 Re: R&J in Lust

Mr. Marx writes:

>Shakespeare probably didn't see it the same way, but his source for RJ,
>Arthur Brooke, prefaced his "Tragicall Historye" with reference to "a
>couple of unfortunate lovers, thralling themselves to unhonest desire;
>neglecting the authority and advice of parents and friends...attempting
>all adventures or peril for the attaining of their wicked lust..." In
>the past few years this has seemed less off the mark to many of my
>students than it did to me when I was their age or now.  They often
>observe that for Romeo, the difference between Rosaline and Juliet is
>that Juliet is game.

I write:

This analysis makes Juliet sound like a piece of meat.  Therefore, it
surely must be wrong for Romeo most adamantly does not share the sexual
philosophy that makes women pieces of meat, the philosophy of "prick
love for the pricking".  Moreover, one does not marry game.

Paul S. Rhodes

[5]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Robin Hamilton <
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Date:           Tuesday, 2 Mar 1999 13:40:25 -0000
Subject: 10.041 Re: Ozymandias
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.041 Re: Ozymandias

>>So, till the judgment that yourself arise,
>>You live in this, and dwell in lover's eyes.
>
>>Cheers,
>>Skip Nicholson
>>South Pasadena (CA) HS
>>
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 >>
>
>You mean "so long lives this, and this gives life to thee"?
>
>Carol Barton

I think Carol Barton may be thinking of an earlier sonnet:

 Shall I compare thee to a Summers day?
 Thou art more louely and more temperate:
 Rough windes do shake the darling buds of Maie,
 And Sommers lease hath all too short a date:
 Sometime too hot the eye of heauen shines,
 And often is his gold complexion dimm'd,
 And euery faire from faire some-time declines,
 By chance, or natures changing course vntrim'd:
 But thy eternall Sommer shall not fade,
 Nor loose possession of that faire thou ow'st,
 Nor shall death brag thou wandr'st in his shade,
 When in eternall lines to time thou grow'st,
 So long as men can breath or eyes can see,
 So long liues this, and this giues life to thee,

-- Robin Hamilton
 

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