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Home :: Archive :: 1999 :: March ::
Re: High School Shakespeare
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.0354  Wednesday 3 March 1999.

[1]     From:   Laura Nunn <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 2 Mar 1999 15:37:20 +0000
        Subj:   SHK 10.042 Re: High School Shakespeare and Getting Back

[2]     From:   Sean Lawrence <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 02 Mar 1999 10:51:49 -0800
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.042 Re: High School Shakespeare and Getting Back


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Laura Nunn <
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Date:           Tuesday, 2 Mar 1999 15:37:20 +0000
Subject: Re: High School Shakespeare and Getting Back
Comment:        SHK 10.042 Re: High School Shakespeare and Getting Back

>>I have no problem with teen-directed versions of Shakespeare.  What I
>>want to see now is senior citizen Shakespeare:  how about a King Lear
>>whose place is either in the streets or in an old folks' home, but not
>>in your home?  How about an age-reversed Romeo and Juliet as
>>octogenarians in love, but separated by warring factions of children?
>>Just how much older than Desdemona IS Othello-and just how old is she?
>>_All's Well That Ends Well_ may be the perfect senior citizen play:  who
>>wants a return to marriageable youth when Bertram is the available
>>husband?  More suggestions welcome.

I've seen a King Lear set in an old people's home; it was touring the UK
a couple of years back.  King Lear was played by a woman (although was
supposed to be male).  The play opened in the old folks' home with
Cordelia visiting him.  The other two sisters turn up, Lear has a
heart-attack, goes to hospital, and "dreams" the actual play.  I seem to
remember it also ended with the hospital scene - the heart monitor
emitting a long bleep.

Laura Nunn

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Sean Lawrence <
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Date:           Tuesday, 02 Mar 1999 10:51:49 -0800
Subject: 10.042 Re: High School Shakespeare and Getting Back
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.042 Re: High School Shakespeare and Getting Back

Nancy Charlton writes:

>A football field is not Scotland or any other nation; the action there,
>being boxed in by rules of the game which are several removes from the
>polities which frame the Shakespearian cosmos.

Surely contemporary politics are also boxed in by constitutional rules
that remove them from the Elizabethan world.  If having rules works as
an argument to stop parallels with contemporary football, it should also
stop parallels with contemporary politics.

That said, of course, all such rule-based semiotics fail to explain
the game itself, as Stanley Cavell points out somewhere.  By
reference to the rule book, I can show why Gretzsky's scoring a
goal is significant, but I can't explain why he's so much better at it
than everybody else.  But that's another argument.

>As for readers in other countries, how about some political parallels
>elsewhere than the USA?

Here, here!  Is Paul Martin likely to play Macbeth to Jean Chretien's
Duncan?  Should the citizen of Angiers in King John be played in
imitation of Lester Pearson, the great diplomat?

Cheers,
Se

 

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