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Home :: Archive :: 1999 :: March ::
Re: Hamlet's Age
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.0399  Monday, 8 March 1999.

[1]     From:   Clifford Stetner <
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        Date:   Saturday, 6 Mar 1999 23:29:21 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.0363 Re: Hamlet's Age

[2]     From:   Geralyn Horton <
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        Date:   Saturday, 06 Mar 1999 00:41:27 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.0376 Re: Hamlet's Age


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Clifford Stetner <
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Date:           Saturday, 6 Mar 1999 23:29:21 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 10.0363 Re: Hamlet's Age
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.0363 Re: Hamlet's Age

There's also Nash's Apology for the Drama (or something like that) in
which he claims that plays offer a place for the idle youth of court and
Inns of Court to while away the afternoon instead of causing mischief.

Clifford Stetner
CUNY
York College
C. W. Post College

<snip>don't know his exact source.  In any case, as Jack Heller points
out,young and rebellious men were a staple of the contemporary stage.
We

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Geralyn Horton <
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 >
Date:           Saturday, 06 Mar 1999 00:41:27 -0500
Subject: 10.0376 Re: Hamlet's Age
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.0376 Re: Hamlet's Age

Just read "Shakespeare's Shakespeare" (1998) from our local library.
Much space devoted to the simultaneous stretching and foreshortening of
time as a structural element of WS's dramaturgy, rather than the result
of carelessness or error.  Author addresses not just such famous
instances as this one or the double time of Othello (when was the
marriage consummated?  How long did it last?  How could D have even had
an opportunity to be unfaithful?) but dozens of others, large and small,
and all quite deliberate, calling attention to dramatic or psychological
time that contradicts the declared clock-times, often within a single
extended scene.

>Why is it so difficult to acknowledge that Hamlet is student age (20 or
>so) when the play begins but 30 by the time it concludes? ------------

>Hamlet is a character in a play. In the last act of that play, the
>character is identified as being thirty years old. The character in the
>beginning appears considerably younger. My assumption has always been
>that the character metaphorically ages between leaving for England and
>returning to Denmark and that the aging involves an acceptance of death

G.L.Horton <http://www.tiac.net/users/ghorton>
 

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