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Home :: Archive :: 1999 :: March ::
Re: DVD; Capulets; Fools; Jonson
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.0412  Tuesday, 9 March 1999.

[1]     From:   Mike Jensen <
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        Date:   Monday, 08 Mar 1999 10:42:00 -0800
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.0397 DVD vs. Laserdisc

[2]     From:   Catherine Loomis <
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        Date:   Monday, 08 Mar 1999 12:12:09 -0600 (CST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.0394 Re: The Capulets

[3]     From:   Stephanie Hughes <
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        Date:   Monday, 08 Mar 1999 16:32:35 +0000
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.0402 Re: Fool

[4]     From:   Frances Barasch <
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        Date:   Monday, 8 Mar 1999 14:17:23 EST
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.0395 Re: Latin-English Grammar Folio


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Mike Jensen <
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Date:           Monday, 08 Mar 1999 10:42:00 -0800
Subject: 10.0397 DVD vs. Laserdisc
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.0397 DVD vs. Laserdisc

Here is my two cents worth on the DVD/Laserdisc discussion.  Go ahead
you wags - AND THAT'S EXACTLY WHAT IT'S WORTH!

I do not have a Laserdisc player and have never seen one work.  I
understand some titles are wonderful research tools with a separate
audio track where the director or an actor discuss the choices made
while filming, out takes that did not make the final print, alternatives
takes, the trailer, sub-titles in other languages, the ability to go to
the start of any scene, and all in wide screen.

I have a DVD player.  Imagine my disappointment when I purchased RAN and
MUCH ADO.  They have the trailers, the sub-titles, I can go to the
beginning of any scene, but the cool stuff stops there.  I can kick RAN
into wide screen, and it does have a smidgen of background for the film
- a page or two, and mostly other credits for the cast and crew, if
memory serves.  Such credits and even the wide screen option are lacking
from MUCH ADO, again if memory serves.

I was very disappointed.  Now comes word that the information encoded on
the disks will begin to corrupt within a decade.

Perhaps someone can enlighten me.  Do the Laserdiscs for RAN and MUCH
ADO have better features than the DVDs?

As ever, disappointed by life,
Mike Jensen

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Catherine Loomis <
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Date:           Monday, 08 Mar 1999 12:12:09 -0600 (CST)
Subject: 10.0394 Re: The Capulets
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.0394 Re: The Capulets

>I don't remember what the usual childbearing years were for women, but
>I'm sure they must have extended into the 30s.

This was certainly true for Mary Arden Shakespeare who married in 1557
and bore children in 1558, 1562, 1564, 1566, 1569, 1571, 1574, and
1580.  Even assuming she married young, that's 22 years worth of
childbearing.

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Stephanie Hughes <
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Date:           Monday, 08 Mar 1999 16:32:35 +0000
Subject: 10.0402 Re: Fool
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.0402 Re: Fool

>>But the word 'pazzo' appears in literary documents since late XIII cent.
>>Dante too uses it .
>>
>>I wonder if any of you on the list knows if in continental Europe of
>>XII-XIII cent. there was a name for popular or courtier jesters  that
>>may be linked to  'patch' or 'pazzo'.

>I suppose this is the origin of the term: "patsy?" (e.g. Lee Harvey
>Oswald) I can only speculate, but it seems to me likely that the English
>took the term "patch" from the Italian stage and simply began
>associating it with the fool's costume.  I don't think the English patch
>as a piece of cloth necessarily sheds any light on the Italian word's
>original etymology.

The current movie, "Patch Adams," comes to mind.  I believe that it is
about clowning.

I can't see a likely connection with the American term "patsy," one who
takes the fall for someone else. Jesters are more likely to be the one
to turn the trick on the stupid.

I'm sure there are others on this list that know more about the medieval
jester/fool than I do, but from what I've read I believe that the
Harlequin of the Commedia started as a ragged beggar whose clothes were
all ragged and patched, and that he seems to have originated as a sort
of mendicant wise man, possibly related to the wise man of the Sufi
tradition, whose wisdom often takes the form of jests, a bit in the
tradition of the tales of Nasrudin.

This original character came to Western Europe along with the travelling
minstrels who brought the courtly love tradition from the middle east,
through the Mediterranean ports of Spain and Italy. He was gradually
absorbed into folk theater, first into Commedia as a devilish Harlequin,
then in France into an elegant Harlequin whose patches had metamorphosed
into glittering lozenges on a skin tight suit, and finally into Punch in
England.

I find this all fascinating, and would appreciate more on it, or
suggested reading.

Stephanie Hughes

[4]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Frances Barasch <
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Date:           Monday, 8 Mar 1999 14:17:23 EST
Subject: 10.0395 Re: Latin-English Grammar Folio
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.0395 Re: Latin-English Grammar Folio

Thanks to Roger Gross, Douglas Lanier, and Peter Groves for refreshing
my memory of Jonson's Grammar.  Frances Barasch
 

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