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Home :: Archive :: 1999 :: March ::
Re: Merry Wives
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.0414  Tuesday, 9 March 1999.

[1]     From:   John Velz <
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        Date:   Monday, 08 Mar 1999 14:33:20 -0600
        Subj:   Merry Wives Latin Lesson

[2]     From:   Joe Conlon <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 9 Mar 1999 08:36:16 -0600
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.0400 Re: Merry Wives Appeal


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           John Velz <
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Date:           Monday, 08 Mar 1999 14:33:20 -0600
Subject:        Merry Wives Latin Lesson

Sean Lawrence on this subject:

has confused Livy, i.e., Titus Livius, the Roman historian, with William
Lily, A Shorte Introduction of Grammar, the standard text in Elizabethan
grammar schools and for two centuries thereafter.  A photographic
facsimile with informative introduction is Vincent J.  Flynn,
ed.Scholars' Facsimiles and Reprints no. 21, 1945.  T. W. Baldwin
discusses this text and its relation to Merry Wives in Vol. 1 Ch. 25 of
William Shakspere's Small Latine & Lesse Greeke Univ. of Illinois Press,
1944.

Cheers
John Velz

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Joe Conlon <
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Date:           Tuesday, 9 Mar 1999 08:36:16 -0600
Subject: 10.0400 Re: Merry Wives Appeal
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.0400 Re: Merry Wives Appeal

I never thought much of the play when I read it the first time.  Then I
saw it performed at the Stratford Ontario, CA Shakespeare Festival a few
years ago and changed my mind.  It starred William Hutt as Falstaff and
it was hilarious and delightful.  The costuming was Victorian and it had
a rather elaborate set.  I agree with Karen's comments-they were
certainly true of me until I had seen the play.  It works on stage much
better than it does in print.

Joe Conlon, Warsaw, IN, USA
 

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