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Home :: Archive :: 1999 :: March ::
Re: You and Thou
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.0444  Friday, 12 March 1999.

[1]     From:   N. R. Moschovakis <
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        Date:   Thursday, 11 Mar 1999 09:11:49 -0600
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.0440 You and Thou

[2]     From:   Steve Urkowitz <
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        Date:   Thursday, 11 Mar 1999 22:02:37 EST
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.0440 You and Thou

[3]     From:   N. Keinanen <
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        Date:   Friday, 12 Mar 1999 10:20:44 +0200
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.0440 You and Thou


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           N. R. Moschovakis <
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Date:           Thursday, 11 Mar 1999 09:11:49 -0600
Subject: 10.0440 You and Thou
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.0440 You and Thou

Ching-Hsi Perng wrote:

>I'd be grateful if anyone can direct me to any works done in the area of
>Shakespeare's use of pronouns.

For an interesting study along sociolinguistic lines, with some
discussion of Shakespeare, see Joseph M. Williams' essay "'O! When
degree is shak'd:' Sixteenth-Century Anticipations of some Modern
Attitudes towards Usage," pp. 69-101 in Tim William Machan and Charles
T. Scott, eds., *English in its Social Contexts* (Oxford 1992).

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Steve Urkowitz <
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Date:           Thursday, 11 Mar 1999 22:02:37 EST
Subject: 10.0440 You and Thou
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.0440 You and Thou

For pronouns of address, Francis Ann Shirley SHAKESPEARE'S USE OF
PRONOUNS OF ADDRESS.

The social rules seem very much dependent on relationships of class and
family status, where almost every signal for formal "plural" politeness
or respect against "singular" familiarity may be juggled to create the
opposing effect of unwarranted familiarity or disrespect.

I've always found that my messy streetcorner language could provide the
emotional dynamics if not the precise linguistic parallels for these
codes of deference or challenge.

Steve Urkowitz

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           N. Keinanen <
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Date:           Friday, 12 Mar 1999 10:20:44 +0200
Subject: 10.0440 You and Thou
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.0440 You and Thou

Ching-Hsi Perng:

Take a look at Clara Calvo's article "Pronouns of address and social
negotiation in _As You Like It," (Language and Literature 1 (1992):
5-27); it summarizes recent discussions of the you/thou distinction in
Shakespeare and includes a good bibliography.

N. Keinanen
University of Helsinki
 

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