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Home :: Archive :: 1999 :: March ::
Re: A Question about poetry
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.0539  Thursday, 25 March 1999.

[1]     From:   W. L. Godshalk <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 24 Mar 1999 12:43:41 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.0528 A Question about poetry

[2]     From:   Roger Gross <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 24 Mar 1999 12:06:02 -0600 (CST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.0528 A Question about poetry

[3]     From:   Tiffany Rasovic <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 24 Mar 1999 13:12:27 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.0528 A Question about poetry

[4]     From:   Ward Elliott <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 24 Mar 1999 14:00:29 -0800 (Pacific Standard Time)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.0528 A Question about poetry

[5]     From:   Laura Fargas <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 24 Mar 1999 22:40:59 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.0528 A Question about poetry


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           W. L. Godshalk <
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Date:           Wednesday, 24 Mar 1999 12:43:41 -0500
Subject: 10.0528 A Question about poetry
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.0528 A Question about poetry

Try Hugh Holman and William Ruth Harmon, A Handbook to Literature.

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Roger Gross <
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Date:           Wednesday, 24 Mar 1999 12:06:02 -0600 (CST)
Subject: 10.0528 A Question about poetry
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.0528 A Question about poetry

Dear Stephanie,

Please forgive me for saying that your question is about VERSE, not
POETRY.  Not all Verse is Poetry and not all Poetry is in Verse.  Big
difference.

The two best books at this time are by Marina Tarlinskaja and by George
Wright (SHAKESPEARE'S METRICS).  Soon, these two will be joined by my
SPEAKING SHAKESPEARE'S VERSE.  Sorry I don't have the titles of the
Tarlinskaja book with me.  Also, I may have slightly misspelled Marina's
last name.

Roger Gross
Univ. of Arkansas

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Tiffany Rasovic <
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Date:           Wednesday, 24 Mar 1999 13:12:27 -0500
Subject: 10.0528 A Question about poetry
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.0528 A Question about poetry

Perhaps A Glossary of Literary Terms by MH Abrahms....

[4]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Ward Elliott <
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Date:           Wednesday, 24 Mar 1999 14:00:29 -0800 (Pacific Standard Time)
Subject: 10.0528 A Question about poetry
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.0528 A Question about poetry

> A friend has asked me to post and ask if anyone knows of a book that
> gives definitive explanations of: feminine endings, open endings,
> mid-line speech endings, line endings and weak endings. He knows what
> they are, but needs something he can cite.

Some basic Shakespeare figures from these tests can be found in F.E.
Halliday, A Shakespeare Companion, Duckworth & Co. London, 1952, pp.
680-682, but not much on definitions.  Some definitions and more recent
figures can be found in Donald Foster, Elegy by W.S., 1989, others in
Marina Tarlinskaja, Shakespeare's Verse, 1987, yet others in various
writings of Brian Vickers. Halliday in 1952 thought the best and most
detailed verse-test figures were those of E.K. Chambers, William
Shakespeare, II, 397-408.

[5]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Laura Fargas <
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Date:           Wednesday, 24 Mar 1999 22:40:59 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 10.0528 A Question about poetry
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.0528 A Question about poetry

On the assumption that this is a question about scansion, rather than
dramatic technique:

In a word, no.  But I think you can put them together from an amalgam of
the following: Louis Turco, The New Book of Forms (A Handbook of
Poetics); Paul Fussell, Jr., Poetic Meter and Poetic Form;  Harvey
Gross, The Structure & Meaning of [Rhythm? Rhyme?] -- ( brown paperback,
goes in and out of print, and I'm having a fit now because I can't find
it); John Hollander, Rhyme's Reason; and the Princeton Encyclopedia of
Poetry and Poetics.  Also interesting for its opinions is C.P. Smith,
Pattern and Variation in Poetry.

"Definitive explanation?"  Feminine ending can be defined as ending on
an unstressed syllable, but there are different kinds of feminine
endings, and how you want to explain the effect of the "fall" can be
debated.  There is, for example, a triple-feminine ending called
"strucciolo" (if memory serves; I can't find it in the indices of Turco
and Fussell), which I think will infallibly produce a comic effect, but
I've had students argue the point in a plausible way.

I've also found it useful to study classical concepts of scansion H.L.
West's Greek Metre, and Greek & Latin Meter, a really excellent,
extremely compact pamphlet by Rosenmeyer (Rosenmeier?) -- Chairman of
Classics at U. C. Berkeley-and there's also a good study of scansion of
early English forms (it was someone's doctoral thesis, Hilda something?
-- it appears to be off with Harvey Gross' book somewhere).

Laura Fargas
 

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