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Home :: Archive :: 1999 :: March ::
Re: Women; Beard; Burton; Cooking; Gower
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.0548  Friday, 26 March 1999.

[1]     From:   Sean Lawrence <
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        Date:   Friday, 19 Mar 1999 09:51:51 -0800
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.0498 Re: Women

[2]     From:   Larry Weiss <
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        Date:   Thursday, 25 Mar 1999 15:33:11 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.0537 Re: Beard

[3]     From:   Larry Weiss <
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        Date:   Thursday, 25 Mar 1999 15:39:35 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.0537 Re: Burton

[4]     From:   Mike Jensen <
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        Date:   Thursday, 25 Mar 1999 09:52:10 -0800
        Subj:   SHK 10.0536 Re: The Cookery of Elizabethan Writing

[5]     From:   Larry Weiss <
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        Date:   Thursday, 25 Mar 1999 20:48:46 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.0537 Re: Gower


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Sean Lawrence <
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Date:           Friday, 19 Mar 1999 09:51:51 -0800
Subject: 10.0498 Re: Women
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.0498 Re: Women

Melissa writes:

>Besides, in many theatrical companies, on the continent and later in
>England, I have the impression that the actresses were often in a
>familial, or at least familiar, relation to the actor/managers.  In that
>case, having women act becomes a potential family monopoly-not bad for
>business.

I think this pretty much does in any economic motivation for banishing
women from the Elizabethan stage.  For an economic motivation to work,
gender loyalties would have to outweigh familial loyalties.  Since (I
believe) most guilds allowed women to work at various crafts, if only in
their husbands' shops, it would seem that familial loyalty was paramount
at the time.  So I guess that we'll just have to look elsewhere for the
surprising absence of women from the Elizabethan stage.

Cheers,
Se

 

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