Make a Donation

Consider making a donation to support SHAKSPER.

Subscribe to Our Feeds

Current Postings RSS

Announcements RSS

Home :: Archive :: 1999 :: March ::
Re: China, Japan, Knox, Elizabeth
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.0582  Tuesday, 30 March 1999.

[1]     From:   Karen Peterson-Kranz <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Tuesday, 30 Mar 1999 09:15:54 +1000
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.0566 Shakespeare in China (and Japan)

[2]     From:   Robin Hamilton <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Tuesday, 30 Mar 1999 13:10:30 +0100
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.0566 Shakespeare in China

[3]     From:   Frances K. Barasch <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Monday, 29 Mar 1999 16:18:09 EST
        Subj:   Re: railing against Elizabeth


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Karen Peterson-Kranz <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Tuesday, 30 Mar 1999 09:15:54 +1000
Subject: 10.0566 Shakespeare in China (and Japan)
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.0566 Shakespeare in China (and Japan)

I was interested in Jack Heller's posting about the response to Timon in
China.  There is still much work to be done on how non-European cultures
make use of Shakespeare.

As another example: I lived, studied and taught in Miyazaki prefecture,
on the southernmost tip of the southernmost island in the Japanese
archipelago (Kyushu) for several years.  During that time, and in
talking to Japanese friends afterward, I became aware of the rather
large cultural role played by King Lear.  Whereas in the US, Romeo and
Juliet tends to be the play which is first introduced, simplified, and
presented to younger students, in Japan it's Lear.  The story is
included in the texts used for elementary school government-required
"moral education."  By the time Japanese students hit junior high,
everyone knows the Lear story, and knows its "moral lesson"-that filial
bonds are broken only at great peril, and that the division of a
previously unified nation-state is a dreadful occurrence.  The former is
not so surprising, but the latter is particularly interesting when
placed in a location such as the one where I was living.  For many
centuries, the southern regions of Japan (southern Kyushu, Okinawa,
etc.), as well as the northernmost islands, functioned autonomously,
with their own language, culture, independent trading relationships,
etc.  Only in the late 19th century was "unity" as a nation-state
attempted.  There is still a tendency in Southern Kyushu and other
marginalized areas to think of themselves as separate from the Tokyo
based government culture.  Lear is seen as a tool of that centralizing
government.

P.S.  If you see Kurosawa's great filmed Lear interpretation, Ran, keep
in mind that Kurosawa was reading against the grain of a story that
everyone in Japan has, by law, studied.  It makes the film even more
interesting.

Cheers,
Karen Peterson-Kranz
University of Guam

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Robin Hamilton <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Tuesday, 30 Mar 1999 13:10:30 +0100
Subject: 10.0566 Shakespeare in China
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.0566 Shakespeare in China

>And on the inquiry about protests of the Virgin Queen,
>I think John Knox railed against her. His works are in print from
>Cambridge.  Hope this helps.
>
>Jack Heller

Knox published +The First Blast of the Trumpet against the Monstrous
Regiment of Women+ in 1558, the year of the death of Mary Tudor and the
accession of Elizabeth, and his opprobrium was directed against Mary
rather than Elizabeth.

I believe he later tried to apologise to Elizabeth for the
(understandable) confusion that may have been caused, but still had to
sail back to Scotland the long way round.

Robin Hamilton

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Frances K. Barasch <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Monday, 29 Mar 1999 16:18:09 EST
Subject:        Re: railing against Elizabeth

For those interested: John Knox's attack on female monarchy, "The First
Blast of the Trumpet Against the Monstruous Regiment of Women" (1558)
was published in Facs. ed. New York: Da Capo, 1972.

frances k. barasch
 

Other Messages In This Thread

©2011 Hardy Cook. All rights reserved.