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Home :: Archive :: 1999 :: March ::
Re: Elizabeth's Nicknames
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.0583  Tuesday, 30 March 1999.

[1]     From:   Carol Barton <
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        Date:   Monday, 29 Mar 1999 09:54:38 EST
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.058 Re: Elizabeth's Nicknames

[2]     From:   Clifford Stetner <
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        Date:   Monday, 29 Mar 1999 12:39:22 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.0544 Re: Elizabeth's Nicknames


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Carol Barton <
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Date:           Monday, 29 Mar 1999 09:54:38 EST
Subject: 10.058 Re: Elizabeth's Nicknames
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.058 Re: Elizabeth's Nicknames

Frank Whigham suggests, rightly:

>I would find it very useful indeed if the various reporters of
>>>Elizabeth's fascinating nicknaming habits would provide specific
>>>references to the texts that document them. The huge array of period
>>>documents of the kind collected, say, in Winwood's Memorials are very
>>>hard to search, and items of this kind are seldom indexed in secondary
>>>sources. Specific references to letters from A to B, dated XYZ, found in
>>>Collection Q, or Work W, or whatever, would be of immense use to many of
>us.

The "little black husband" nickname for Whitgift was cited by Mary M.
Luke in Gloriana: The Years of Elizabeth I (NY: Coward, McCann &
Geoghan, 1973), c.606.  Another useful work for anecdotes of this type
is Neville Williams' All the Queen's Men: Elizabeth I and Her
Courtiers.  (London: Cardinal Press, 1972).  As Stephanie points out,
though, many biographers, even the very responsible ones, merely cite
the information as a commonplace, without indicating that "in a speech
given at X on Y, Queen Elizabeth said Z."

Certainly, good scholarship demands that anyone who provides such
information be able to cite his or her sources-but in fairness to the
respondents, Frank, sometimes we may think the details burdensome to
anyone who doesn't express immediate interest, or we may be away from
our offices (and the specifics) at the time we first answer the
question.  There are other works you might find useful, if you are
intrigued by this sort of thing; my bibliography is by no means
exhaustive, but it will point you in the right direction, anyway.
Please mail me offline if you'd like to have it.

Best to all,
Carol Barton

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Clifford Stetner <
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Date:           Monday, 29 Mar 1999 12:39:22 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 10.0544 Re: Elizabeth's Nicknames (fwd)
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.0544 Re: Elizabeth's Nicknames (fwd)

If I were to speculate:

My Moor *is* my More

My frog is from the Frog Prince fairy tale

My spirit is like my Ariel (disregarding the anachronism; the idea was
around even if the character hadn't been invented yet)

Clifford Stetner
CUNY
York College
C.W. Post College
 

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