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Home :: Archive :: 1999 :: March ::
Re: Feste; Isabella; Lyly; Who; Poetry; Atlantic
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.0585  Tuesday, 30 March 1999.

[1]     From:   Carol Fortunato <
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        Date:   Monday, 29 Mar 1999 11:57:41 EST
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.0564 Assorted Responses

[2]     From:   Sean Lawrence <
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        Date:   Monday, 29 Mar 1999 09:18:22 -0800
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.0564 Assorted Responses

[3]     From:   N. R. Moschovakis <
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        Date:   Monday, 29 Mar 1999 12:44:55 -0600
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.0564 Assorted Responses

[4]     From:   L. Swilley <
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        Date:   Monday, 29 Mar 1999 13:38:28 -0600
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.059 Re: Who wrote, etc.?

[5]     From:   Christine Mack Gordon <
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        Date:   Monday, 29 Mar 1999 16:09:31 CST6CDT
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.0561 Re: A Question about poetry

[6]     From:   Abdul Karim Bangura <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 30 Mar 1999 00:16:40 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.0568 Atlantic Monthly


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Carol Fortunato <
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Date:           Monday, 29 Mar 1999 11:57:41 EST
Subject: 10.0564 Assorted Responses
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.0564 Assorted Responses

>>We did TWELFTH NIGHT at Le Moyne College, and director Bill Morris had
>>Feste realize that Cesario is a woman.  As we performed it (I played
>>Feste) Feste is sitting next to Viola, takes her hand to show how a
>>cheveril glove "may be turned outward," and as he looks at her hand sees
>>that it's a woman's.  Never lets on, but realizes that he's out of his
>>depth, so that "Who you are and what you would are out of my welkin" is
>>a distancing from whatever is going on.  Viola doesn't know that he
>>knows, but in any case she always has a residual anxiety about being
>>found out, and Feste's manner doesn't help.    --Neil Novelli
>
>Thanks for that insight. I always delight in production choices that
>suddenly illuminate such specific lines in fresh ways, while adding to
>the richness of the experience, both for actors and for audience.

When we did 12th Night (I played Feste and co-directed), we did
something similar, (though we didn't use the glove for the purpose),
although I only hinted at it, and let the audience guess, instead of
making it blatant.  This was how I interpreted Feste's line to Viola
"Who you are and what you will is out of my welkin."  It also enabled me
to play the scene where Feste sings "Come Away, Death" to Viola/Cesario
and Orsino as though he were TRYING to provoke a romance.

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Sean Lawrence <
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Date:           Monday, 29 Mar 1999 09:18:22 -0800
Subject: 10.0564 Assorted Responses
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.0564 Assorted Responses

Catherine Loomis mentions the following analogue to Measure:

>You may want to have your students read scene xiii from Robert Greene's
>Friar Bacon and Friar Bungay in which Margaret enters "in Nuns
>apparrell" and encounters her lover Lord Lacie.  Margaret is enjoined
>"Choose you, faire damsell, yet the choise is yours, / Either a solemne
>Nunnerie, or the court, / God, or Lord Lacie, weich contents you best, /
>To be a Nun, or els Lord Lacies wife."  Margaret chooses Lord Lacie,
>announcing "Off goes the habite of a maidens heart."   This shows what
>Measure's original audience may have been expecting to see when Isabella
>is offered a similar choice.

One might also consider MND 1.1, for a similar choice of marriage or
celibacy.  This seems to be a choice to which Shakespeare keeps
returning.

Cheers,
Se

 

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