1999

Re: Elizabeth's Nicknames

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.0583  Tuesday, 30 March 1999.

[1]     From:   Carol Barton <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 29 Mar 1999 09:54:38 EST
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.058 Re: Elizabeth's Nicknames

[2]     From:   Clifford Stetner <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 29 Mar 1999 12:39:22 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.0544 Re: Elizabeth's Nicknames


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Carol Barton <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 29 Mar 1999 09:54:38 EST
Subject: 10.058 Re: Elizabeth's Nicknames
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.058 Re: Elizabeth's Nicknames

Frank Whigham suggests, rightly:

>I would find it very useful indeed if the various reporters of
>>>Elizabeth's fascinating nicknaming habits would provide specific
>>>references to the texts that document them. The huge array of period
>>>documents of the kind collected, say, in Winwood's Memorials are very
>>>hard to search, and items of this kind are seldom indexed in secondary
>>>sources. Specific references to letters from A to B, dated XYZ, found in
>>>Collection Q, or Work W, or whatever, would be of immense use to many of
>us.

The "little black husband" nickname for Whitgift was cited by Mary M.
Luke in Gloriana: The Years of Elizabeth I (NY: Coward, McCann &
Geoghan, 1973), c.606.  Another useful work for anecdotes of this type
is Neville Williams' All the Queen's Men: Elizabeth I and Her
Courtiers.  (London: Cardinal Press, 1972).  As Stephanie points out,
though, many biographers, even the very responsible ones, merely cite
the information as a commonplace, without indicating that "in a speech
given at X on Y, Queen Elizabeth said Z."

Certainly, good scholarship demands that anyone who provides such
information be able to cite his or her sources-but in fairness to the
respondents, Frank, sometimes we may think the details burdensome to
anyone who doesn't express immediate interest, or we may be away from
our offices (and the specifics) at the time we first answer the
question.  There are other works you might find useful, if you are
intrigued by this sort of thing; my bibliography is by no means
exhaustive, but it will point you in the right direction, anyway.
Please mail me offline if you'd like to have it.

Best to all,
Carol Barton

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Clifford Stetner <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 29 Mar 1999 12:39:22 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 10.0544 Re: Elizabeth's Nicknames (fwd)
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.0544 Re: Elizabeth's Nicknames (fwd)

If I were to speculate:

My Moor *is* my More

My frog is from the Frog Prince fairy tale

My spirit is like my Ariel (disregarding the anachronism; the idea was
around even if the character hadn't been invented yet)

Clifford Stetner
CUNY
York College
C.W. Post College

Re: China, Japan, Knox, Elizabeth

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.0582  Tuesday, 30 March 1999.

[1]     From:   Karen Peterson-Kranz <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 30 Mar 1999 09:15:54 +1000
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.0566 Shakespeare in China (and Japan)

[2]     From:   Robin Hamilton <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 30 Mar 1999 13:10:30 +0100
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.0566 Shakespeare in China

[3]     From:   Frances K. Barasch <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 29 Mar 1999 16:18:09 EST
        Subj:   Re: railing against Elizabeth


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Karen Peterson-Kranz <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 30 Mar 1999 09:15:54 +1000
Subject: 10.0566 Shakespeare in China (and Japan)
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.0566 Shakespeare in China (and Japan)

I was interested in Jack Heller's posting about the response to Timon in
China.  There is still much work to be done on how non-European cultures
make use of Shakespeare.

As another example: I lived, studied and taught in Miyazaki prefecture,
on the southernmost tip of the southernmost island in the Japanese
archipelago (Kyushu) for several years.  During that time, and in
talking to Japanese friends afterward, I became aware of the rather
large cultural role played by King Lear.  Whereas in the US, Romeo and
Juliet tends to be the play which is first introduced, simplified, and
presented to younger students, in Japan it's Lear.  The story is
included in the texts used for elementary school government-required
"moral education."  By the time Japanese students hit junior high,
everyone knows the Lear story, and knows its "moral lesson"-that filial
bonds are broken only at great peril, and that the division of a
previously unified nation-state is a dreadful occurrence.  The former is
not so surprising, but the latter is particularly interesting when
placed in a location such as the one where I was living.  For many
centuries, the southern regions of Japan (southern Kyushu, Okinawa,
etc.), as well as the northernmost islands, functioned autonomously,
with their own language, culture, independent trading relationships,
etc.  Only in the late 19th century was "unity" as a nation-state
attempted.  There is still a tendency in Southern Kyushu and other
marginalized areas to think of themselves as separate from the Tokyo
based government culture.  Lear is seen as a tool of that centralizing
government.

P.S.  If you see Kurosawa's great filmed Lear interpretation, Ran, keep
in mind that Kurosawa was reading against the grain of a story that
everyone in Japan has, by law, studied.  It makes the film even more
interesting.

Cheers,
Karen Peterson-Kranz
University of Guam

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Robin Hamilton <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 30 Mar 1999 13:10:30 +0100
Subject: 10.0566 Shakespeare in China
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.0566 Shakespeare in China

>And on the inquiry about protests of the Virgin Queen,
>I think John Knox railed against her. His works are in print from
>Cambridge.  Hope this helps.
>
>Jack Heller

Knox published +The First Blast of the Trumpet against the Monstrous
Regiment of Women+ in 1558, the year of the death of Mary Tudor and the
accession of Elizabeth, and his opprobrium was directed against Mary
rather than Elizabeth.

I believe he later tried to apologise to Elizabeth for the
(understandable) confusion that may have been caused, but still had to
sail back to Scotland the long way round.

Robin Hamilton

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Frances K. Barasch <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 29 Mar 1999 16:18:09 EST
Subject:        Re: railing against Elizabeth

For those interested: John Knox's attack on female monarchy, "The First
Blast of the Trumpet Against the Monstruous Regiment of Women" (1558)
was published in Facs. ed. New York: Da Capo, 1972.

frances k. barasch

Re: RSC Workshops on Video

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.0580  Tuesday, 30 March 1999.

[1]     From:   Ronald Moyer <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 29 Mar 1999 14:47:53 -0600 (CST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.0569 Wanted: RSC Workshops on Video

[2]     From:   Evelyn Gajowski <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 29 Mar 1999 14:58:18 -0800 (PST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.0569 Wanted: RSC Workshops on Video

[3]     From:   David Kathman <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 29 Mar 1999 18:55:03 -0600
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.0569 Wanted: RSC Workshops on Video

[4]     From:   Jim Shaw <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 30 Mar 1999 09:11:53 GMT
        Subj:   Re: RSC workshops on video


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Ronald Moyer <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 29 Mar 1999 14:47:53 -0600 (CST)
Subject: 10.0569 Wanted: RSC Workshops on Video
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.0569 Wanted: RSC Workshops on Video

The Playing Shakespeare videos can be purchased in the USA from Films
for the Humanities and Sciences.  For more information, search "Playing
Shakespeare" or "Exploring a Character" at their website:
<www.films.com>. The eleven-video set (nine programs/chapters from
Barton's book and two earlier programs hosted by Trevor Nunn, featuring
Barton and including McKellin's anatomizing of "Tomorrow and
tomorrow...") sells for US$899; each episode lists for US$89.95.
Best,
Ron Moyer, Univ. of South Dakota

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Evelyn Gajowski <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 29 Mar 1999 14:58:18 -0800 (PST)
Subject: 10.0569 Wanted: RSC Workshops on Video
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.0569 Wanted: RSC Workshops on Video

To Don Ulin:

The 1999 Films for the Humanities and Sciences catalog (800-257-5126)
has the 11-part series of videos to which you refer, *Playing
Shakespeare*, available for $899.00 (#BZF137).  The particular video to
which you refer, "Exploring a Character," is devoted to playing Shylock,
and includes David Suchet and Patrick Stewart tackling the role under
the direction of John Barton, and is available for $89.95 (#BZF760).

Best regards,
Evelyn Gajowski
University of Nevada, Las Vegas

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           David Kathman <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 29 Mar 1999 18:55:03 -0600
Subject: 10.0569 Wanted: RSC Workshops on Video
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.0569 Wanted: RSC Workshops on Video

Don Ulin wrote:

>I have tried what tricks I know to track down a video of the "nine
>workshop programmes made in 1982 by the Royal Shakespeare Company for
>London Weekend Radio and shown on Channel Four in 1984."  That
>description comes from the book Playing Shakespeare by John Barton
>(Methuen 1984).  I gather that a set of videos exists corresponding to
>the chapters in this book, and what I really want is the one that goes
>with Chapter 10, "Exploring a Character: Playing Shylock."
>
>I would be tremendously grateful if anyone could tell me where I might
>find this/these video(s).

I have a copy of the Fall 1984 Shakespeare Newsletter with a color
insert for the video series you've described.  It's a series of nine
videos, with Barton directing a cast including Ben Kingsley, Ian
McKellen, Sinead Cusack, Jane Lapotaire, Alan Howard, Peggy Ashcroft,
and others.  The series was being sold then by Films for the Humanities,
and a quick web search revealed that this company is still doing
business as Films for the Humanities and Sciences.  Their web site is at
http://www.films.com, and the "Exploring a Character" video in
particular can be purchased for $89.95 at
http://www.films.com/Dynamic/Item/Item760A.asp?OrderID=P1999032919383817.

Dave Kathman
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

[4]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Jim Shaw <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 30 Mar 1999 09:11:53 GMT
Subject:        Re: RSC workshops on video

The good news is that the series Playing Shakespeare - a series of
workshops with John Barton - is available for sale on the Films for the
Humanities and Sciences website (http://www.films.com).  The bad news is
that it retails at 899.00 US dollars.  If anyone knows of a cheaper
option please let me know.

Yours,
Jim Shaw
Shakespeare Institute

Allegory

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.0581  Tuesday, 30 March 1999.

From:           Ed Taft <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 29 Mar 1999 14:00:06 -0500 (EST)
Subject:        Allegory

My thanks to Brian Haylett for an intelligent response to my comments
about the future of allegory in Shakespeare studies. Brian is certainly
right to point out that all allegory is not the same. When, for example,
the good and bad angels appear to Faustus, what do we have? Psychdrama?
Allegory? Both? Probably both, don't you think? Which leads me to think
that allegory must be subdivided into, say, psychological allegory,
historical allegory, spiritual allegory, etc. But as I write this, I
can't help thinking of Polonius: "pastorical-comical,
historical-pastoral, tragical-historical,
tragical-comical-historical-pastoral" (!) This sudden insight into how I
sound makes me think that it is time to leave this issue and go to SAA,
where, with luck, my affinities with Polonius will not be much noticed.

--Ed Taft

Shenandoah Shakespeare Express

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.0579  Tuesday, 30 March 1999.

From:           Bill Gordon <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 29 Mar 1999 14:03:57 EST
Subject:        Shenandoah Shakespeare Express

Our 1999 Vaulting Ambition Tour (Macbeth, The Merchant of Venice, and
The Knight of the Burning Pestle) is still available on scattered dates
throughout the Fall:

Early to mid September:  Tennessee/Arkansas/Missouri area
Late September to early October:  Indiana/Ohio area
1st Full week of October:   Pennsylvania area
Early November:  Maine area
Mid November:  Massachusetts area
Mid to late November:  Massachusetts down the eastern seaboard to
Virginia

Our Eaten Heart Tour (Hamlet and Much Ado about Nothing) also still has
some availability in the Fall:

Mid October to early November:  Deep South and Florida
Mid November to late November:  Carolinas/Virginia/DC/Maryland

Those interested in any of our available dates can e-mail, or call me at
our offices in Staunton, Virginia at (540) 885-5588.

Warmest regards to all,
Bill Gordon
Director of Booking & Sales
Shenandoah Shakespeare Express

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