1999

Re: Antonio and Sebatian of TN

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.0381  Friday, 5 March 1999.

[1]     From:   Christine Mack Gordon <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 4 Mar 1999 12:32:59 CST6CDT
        Subj:   Re: Antonio and Sebatian of TN

[2]     From:   Marilyn A. Bonomi <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 4 Mar 1999 11:21:44 -0800 (PST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.0366 Re: TN


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Christine Mack Gordon <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 4 Mar 1999 12:32:59 CST6CDT
Subject:        Re: Antonio and Sebatian of MN

Laurie Osborne's book _The Trick of Singularity: Twelfth Night and the
Performance Editions_ (U of Iowa Press, 1996) has a full chapter on the
way in which the relationship between Antonio and Sebastian has been
handled over time. Michael Billington's conversations with RSC directors
Bill Alexander, John Barton, John Caird, and Terry Hands (in RSC
Directors' Shakespeare: Approaches to Twelfth Night, published in 1990)
also includes some discussion of this). In contemporary productions I've
seen, homoerotic elements have been ignored and incorporated; when
ignored, the text has usually been cut.

Chris Gordon

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Marilyn A. Bonomi <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 4 Mar 1999 11:21:44 -0800 (PST)
Subject: 10.0366 Re: TN
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.0366 Re: TN

Mary Tyler Knowles asks, re Antonio: <<I wonder how he was played if
there was no passion on his part for Sebastian?>>

I saw a production where he was considerably OLDER than Antonio... the
love was played as clearly paternalistic... he loved BOTH twins as a
father would have.  Can't recall what lines if any were cut, however....

Regarding the # of plays Shakespeare claimed in the Cosby show-couldn't
it be simply that the writers hadn't a clue and thought that's what they
remembered from high school?  We DO try to read subtexts, don't we, even
when the likelihood of subtexts being present is extremely low/

Marilyn B.

Re: Video Discs

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.0380  Friday, 5 March 1999.

[1]     From:   William Kemp <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 04 Mar 1999 11:14:01 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.0368 Q: Video Discs

[2]     From:   Hardy Cook <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Friday, 05 Mar 1999 09:31:06 -0500
        Subj:   Re: Video Disks


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           William Kemp <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 04 Mar 1999 11:14:01 -0500
Subject: 10.0368 Q: Video Discs
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.0368 Q: Video Discs

Shakespeare on videodisc off the top of my head (and in random order):

Twelfth Night (dir. Trevor Nunn)

Hamlet (dir. Olivier; dir. Zefferelli; dir. Branagh)

Richard III (dir. Olivier; dir. Loncraine <sp?>)

Othello (the most recent one, with Lawrence Fishburne)

Romeo and Juliet (dir. Zefferelli; dir. Lurhman)

Henry V (dir. Olivier; dir. Branagh)

Much Ado About Nothing (dir. Branagh)

Ran (dir. Kurasawa)

Throne of Blood (dir. Kurasawa)

The Internet Movie Database lists videodisc versions if they're
available (or have ever been available -- some are out of print).

Bill Kemp
Mary Washington College
Fredericksburg, Va.
USA

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Hardy Cook <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 05 Mar 1999 09:31:06 -0500
Subject:        Re: Video Disks

I was under the impression the laser video disks are an obsolete
technology and the DVD would probably be the technology to replace laser
disks. Am I incorrect in my assumption?

Hardy

Re: Iago

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.0378  Friday, 5 March 1999.

[1]     From:   Brian Haylett <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 4 Mar 1999 15:52:29 -0000
        Subj:

[2]     From:   Roger Schmeeckle <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 4 Mar 1999 13:59:35 -0800 (PST)
        Subj:   Othello; Iago

[3]     From:   John Savage <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Friday, 5 Mar 1999 10:10:31 -0500
        Subj:   SHK 10.0359 Re: Othello; Iago

[4]     From:   John Savage <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Friday, 5 Mar 1999 10:10:51 -0500
        Subj:   SHK 10.0359 Re: Othello; Iago


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Brian Haylett <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 4 Mar 1999 15:52:29 -0000
Subject:        Re: Iago

Kenneth Requa wrote: I made a comment referring to Harold Bloom's
assertion that Iago must have been a truly loyal subject at one point in
order to earn the trust of Othello and friends and that he experiences a
"fall" at or before the beginning of the play.

At one level, this leads to the fallacy that Knights detected in
Bradley: the fallacy of assuming that characters exist outside the play
and that it is possible to speculate on what happened before or after.
The fact is that we are not told why Iago is so senior and, literally,
that is the end of the matter. However, that need not be the end if we
think it relevant to consider what Iago represents.  John Vyvyan (The
Shakespearean Ethic, 1959) said "The tempter is the fault in the hero's
soul made flesh". On similarly allegorical lines, Harold Goddard (The
Meaning of Shakespeare, 1951) saw Iago as the spirit of War within
Othello. I incline towards the latter on this occasion, but in either
case Iago would be "our ancient" because he has been the preferred side
of Othello himself. If we take Goddard's assumption, then it would be
apt that Iago is displaced when Othello ventures into marriage and that
Othello's own insecurity in this new life gives Iago fresh strength. I
am afraid I got down my Goddard today after hearing Harold Bloom
praising him on BBC TV last night; but Goddard (at least!), deserves
consideration: "Othello regarded Desdemona's love for him as a dream too
beautiful to be true. Hence, when it is suggested to him that it is not
true, this is in a sense nothing but what he has been ready to believe
all along."

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Roger Schmeeckle <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 4 Mar 1999 13:59:35 -0800 (PST)
Subject:        Othello; Iago

>A question from a student discussing Othello in class:
>
>The other day when my AP Lit class was discussing Othello we were trying
>to come to a conclusion as to why Iago is who he is and how he manages
>to gull everyone so effectively.  During the course of the discussion I
>made a comment referring to Harold Bloom's assertion that Iago must have
>been a truly loyal subject at one point in order to earn the trust of
>Othello and friends and that he experiences a "fall" at or before the
>beginning of the play.  My teacher had apparently never considered that
>idea and I wondered what opinions others might have.  Thanks!
>
>Kenneth Requa
>Springfield High School
>Springfield, IL

Since you invited opinions, I provide mine.  I make not claim to having
studied or researched this, and I might change my opinion, especially if
someone points out to me that it is contradicted by something in the
text or that it is unreasonable.

Iago is motivated by envy.  He is bitter because he has been passed over
for a promotion that went to one he considers his inferior.  He sees
himself as a better soldier, disregarding other considerations that
rightly were considered in making the promotion.  He has many
counterparts in the modern world.  For instance, sergeants who are
envious of the new lieutenant just out of West Point, who has no combat
experience; or employees who have worked ten years for a company, only
to see some college graduate start at their own level in the company.

My further opinion, and this is really speculative.  Shakespeare, at
some time in his career, entertained the notion of a series of plays
dealing with the various deadly sins.  This project was carried out in
the seven great tragedies, although, in the course of time and
composition, other factors may have assumed far greater importance than
the deadly sins motive.  In accordance with that hypothesis, Othello,
the play, is intended to exemplify the dreadful consequences of envy.

     Roger Schmeeckle

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           John Savage <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 5 Mar 1999 10:10:31 -0500
Subject: Re: Othello; Iago
Comment:        SHK 10.0359 Re: Othello; Iago

>Harold Bloom's assertion that Iago must have
>been a truly loyal subject at one point in order to earn the trust of
>Othello and friends and that he experiences a "fall" at or before the
>beginning of the play.

Sorry, I don't see it.  Iago is a con man, and as such he would have
been convincing to Othello at all times, but he, Iago, would never have
changed.

[4]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           John Savage <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 5 Mar 1999 10:10:51 -0500
Subject: Re: Othello; Iago
Comment:        SHK 10.0359 Re: Othello; Iago

>My own interpretation has to do with
>military discipline, how Henry lets slip the dogs of war in their attack
>on Harfleur, and how he's horrified at the possibilities he's let loose.

I'd see it differently.  Henry V says the most horrible things to get
Harfleur to surrender-"the blind and bloody soldier with foul hand
defile the locks of your shrill-shriking daughters...your naked infants
spitted upon pikes"-but we're entitled to believe he didn't really mean
any of them because once the surrender takes place he says, "Use mercy
to them all for us."

Re: Shakespeare on Bewitched

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.0379  Friday, 5 March 1999.

[1]     From:   Mike Jensen <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 04 Mar 1999 09:50:59 -0800
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.0369 Shakespeare on Bewitch

[2]     From:   Stephen Holcombe <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 04 Mar 1999 20:07:37 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.0369 Shakespeare on Bewitched


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Mike Jensen <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 04 Mar 1999 09:50:59 -0800
Subject: 10.0369 Shakespeare on Bewitched
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.0369 Shakespeare on Bewitched

>Maurice, Samantha's father, mentioned another warlock, who wrote "Lord, what
>fools these mortals be" and started in on the "All the world's a stage..." before
>Samantha interrupted him and asked him to leave.

This is very funny metadramatically, I think the word fits here, since I
believe that character was played by Maurice Evans who did seven
Shakespearean productions for The Hallmark Hall of Fame in the early 50s
through the early 60s, and was perhaps the best known Shakespearean
actor on the American stage in the 40s.  His uncut Hamlet in the late
30s, and his G.I. Hamlet during WWII and after were particular
sensations.  All this followed much praise at the Old Vic between the
wars.

This is even funnier since many of us who see the kinescopes of those
Hallmark shows think he is pretty awful.  He received a lot of praise at
the time, but there was a strong undercurrent of dispraise for the
sameness of his TV performances and the flatness of his verse speaking,
the very faults I find viewing his work today.

Mike Jensen

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Stephen Holcombe <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 04 Mar 1999 20:07:37 -0500
Subject: 10.0369 Shakespeare on Bewitched
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.0369 Shakespeare on Bewitched

And of course Maurice was played by Maurice Evans, who during the 1950's
was generally thought of as a Shakespearean actor. Later, of course, he
reached his thespian apotheosis as Dr. Zaius in the "Planet of the Apes"
films.

"HAMLET" on MST3K?

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.0377  Friday, 5 March 1999.

[1]     From:   Richard Nathan <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 4 Mar 1999 15:38:39 +0000
        Subj:   "HAMLET" on MST3K?

[2]     From:   Richard Nathan <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Friday, 5 Mar 1999 04:12:38 +0000
        Subj:   "HAMLET" on MST3K?


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Richard Nathan <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 4 Mar 1999 15:38:39 +0000
Subject:        "HAMLET" on MST3K?

I don't know how many of your are familiar with "MYSTERY SCIENCE THEATER
3000."  It's a cable program shown in the U.S. where one human being and
two robots watch bad movies and make comments about them during the
films.  Over they years, they've made quite a number of references to
Shakespeare.

When the program was on Comedy Central, the bad movies they showed
included lots of genres, but since the show switched to the Sci-Fi
Channel, they've stuck to science fiction and fantasy.

I saw a story in the news recently that said the new season, starting in
April, would be the last season.  The story also said that one of the
films they would be doing was a German version of "HAMLET," - shot in
the 1960's.

Is anyone out there familiar with a sixties, German version of "HAMLET"?

Does it involve fantasy or sceience fiction?

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Richard Nathan <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 5 Mar 1999 04:12:38 +0000
Subject:        "HAMLET" on MST3K?

I feel like such an idiot.

I couldn't figure out why they would be showing a German version of
"HAMLET" on MST3K, because one of the rules seems to be that they only
show science fction / fantasy films on the series since it went to the
Sci-Fi Channel.

Several people on the alt.tv.mst3k newsgroup have pointed out to me that
there's a ghost in "HAMLET" - so it qualifies as a fantasy film.

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