1999

Re: Ozymandias

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.041  Tuesday 2 March 1999.

[1]     From:   Carol Barton <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 1 Mar 1999 09:03:54 EST
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.0326 Re: Ozymandias

[2]     From:   Robin Hamilton <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 1 Mar 1999 19:22:05 -0000
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.0326 Re: Ozymandias

[3]     From:   Richard J Kennedy <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 1 Mar 1999 20:23:11 -0800 (PST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.0326 Re: Ozymandias

[4]     From:   Nancy Charlton <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 01 Mar 1999 23:20:30 -0800
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.0321 Re: Ozymandias


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Carol Barton <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 1 Mar 1999 09:03:54 EST
Subject: 10.0326 Re: Ozymandias
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.0326 Re: Ozymandias

>Another English poet, of course, remarked that:

>Not marble, nor the gilded monuments
>Of princes, shall outlive this powerful rhyme;
>But you shall shine more bright in these contents
>Than unswept stone besmear'd with sluttish time.
>When wasteful war shall statues overturn,
>And broils root out the work of masonry,
>Nor Mars his sword nor war's quick fire shall burn
>The living record of your memory.
>'Gainst death and all-oblivious enmity
>Shall you pace forth; your praise shall still find room
>Even in the eyes of all posterity
>That wear this world out to the ending doom.
>So, till the judgment that yourself arise,
>You live in this, and dwell in lover's eyes.

>Cheers,
>Skip Nicholson
>South Pasadena (CA) HS
>This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>>

You mean "so long lives this, and this gives life to thee"?

Carol Barton

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Robin Hamilton <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 1 Mar 1999 19:22:05 -0000
Subject: 10.0326 Re: Ozymandias
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.0326 Re: Ozymandias

>Another English poet, of course, remarked that:
>
>Not marble, nor the gilded monuments
>Of princes, shall outlive this powerful rhyme;
>
>Skip Nicholson

But he also said in 81:

Your name from hence immortall life shall haue,
Though I (once gone) to all the world must dye,

Shame Bill forgot to mention what it was, but then it's always the
artists rather than the subjects who win out in the end.

There's also a poem by Hugh MacDiarmid that's apposite:

               The Eeneis Stane

I' the how-dumb-deid o' the cauld hairst nicht
The warl' like an eemis stane
Wags i' the lift;
An' my eerie memories fa'
Like a yowdendrift.

Like a yowdendrift so's I couldna read
The words cut ooti' the stane
Had the fug o' fame
An' history's hazeiraw
No' yirdit thaim.

-- Robin Hamilton

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Richard J Kennedy <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 1 Mar 1999 20:23:11 -0800 (PST)
Subject: 10.0326 Re: Ozymandias
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.0326 Re: Ozymandias

If no one has mentioned it, a week or two ago cartoon in the New Yorker,
by Booth: A under the street worker is arising from his manhole and
proclaiming to the world at large:

"My name is Ozymandias...look on my works..." etc.

[4]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Nancy Charlton <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 01 Mar 1999 23:20:30 -0800
Subject: 10.0321 Re: Ozymandias
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.0321 Re: Ozymandias

I never in all my life thought of this before, but could it be that the
"traveler from an antique land" was traveling in time as well as-or
instead of-space?  If so, he may be describing the statue as already
ruined in a time still ancient to Shelley.  That is why "nothing beside
remains" and why the "lone and level sands stretch far away."  So then,
is the traveler saying the enduring aspect of King of Kings is the
"sneer of cold command," i.e., that the psychological verities of human
nature outlive all statecraft and power?  That they require the medium
of art to maintain their immortality?

Further, I can't help but notice the difference in tone between this and
"Not marble, nor the gilded monuments."  Ozymandias leaves you with a
negation; Shakespeare's tribute "'gainst death and all-oblivious enmity"
establishes love as the constant and immortal affirmation.  Ozymandias
Rex had no love?

Nah -- that's too simple!

Nancy Charlton
Portland OR

P.S.  "King of Kings" was also the appellation of Agamemnon.  Since this
name is of Egyptian origin, could Ozymandias/Rameses also be an oblique
reference to that particular classical can of worms?

Re: A Humorous Site

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.040  Monday 2 March 1999.

[1]     From:   Carol A. Cole <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Sunday, 28 Feb 1999 11:34:47 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.0335 A Humorous Site

[2]     From:   Ron Dwelle <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 1 Mar 1999 11:49:12 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.0335 A Humorous Site

[3]     From:   Marilyn Bonomi <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 01 Mar 1999 19:40:22 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.0335 A Humorous Site


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Carol A. Cole <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Sunday, 28 Feb 1999 11:34:47 -0500
Subject: 10.0335 A Humorous Site
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.0335 A Humorous Site

So Marilyn, what's the address?  Don't keep us in suspense!

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Ron Dwelle <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 1 Mar 1999 11:49:12 -0500
Subject: 10.0335 A Humorous Site
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.0335 A Humorous Site

I missed the site. Maybe my server truncated the message?

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Marilyn Bonomi <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 01 Mar 1999 19:40:22 -0500
Subject: 10.0335 A Humorous Site
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.0335 A Humorous Site

>A wonderful deconstruction of Hamlet's "famous" soliloquy by  guest
>scholar "Dr.Thinklethwait," eminent dissector of things dramatic (and
>otherwise?).

Apparently the insertion of the URL didn't take... kind of like some of
those small pox vaccinations of my childhood... took the doc's five
tries to get me protected... and the only spot that worked was the
outside of my left knee-joint....

At any rate, the URL is

http://members.aol.com/PhilM4/page3.html

and I was using the term "deconstruction" VERY loosely... it's more
appropriate to say "destruction" thereof.  I did say "humorous,"
however.

Sorry for any confusion!

Marilyn Bonomi

Rosenbach Lectures in Bibliography

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.0338  Monday 1 March 1999.

From:           Daniel Traister <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Saturday, 27 Feb 1999 12:31:40 -0500 (EST)
Subject:        Rosenbach Lectures in Bibliography

*****   PLEASE EXCUSE DUPLICATE POSTINGS; PLEASE FORWARD TO   *****
*****             POTENTIALLY INTERESTED PARTIES.             *****

The 1999 Rosenbach Lectures in Bibliography will be presented in the
Lessing J. Rosenwald Gallery, 6th floor, Van Pelt-Dietrich Library,
University of Pennsylvania (*NOT* the Rosenbach Museum and Library!).
The address is 3420 Walnut Street (entrance on Locust Walk, at the
statue of the broken button), Philadelphia, PA. This year's Fellow,
Brian Stock (University of Toronto), presents three lectures under the
general title of "Minds, Bodies, Readers":

        Tuesday, 23 March:
        Healing, Meditation, and the History of Reading

        Wednesday, 24 March:
        Healers without Books, Readers without Souls

        Thursday, March 25:
        Clinical Therapies, Readerly Mentalities

Each lecture starts at 5.30 P.M. Receptions will follow each lecture.

Professor Stock addresses in this series the relationship between the
mind-body dualism in western medicine and the history of reading in the
early modern era. The bridge between the two is the practice of
thera-peutic meditation as a function of reading, a tradition with deep
classical and medieval roots. Its techniques were changed or abandoned
altogether by the seventeenth century and not recovered again until
relatively recently. Professor Stock's lectures explore the implications
of these changes and their consequences today.

Professor Stock's genuinely foundational writings include *The
Implica-tions of Literacy* (Princeton 1983), acclaimed by Walter Ong as
"a major seminal work" that "shows how in a deep sense the Middle Ages
was by far the most literate period that Western culture has ever
known." Other recent books include Listening for the Text: On the Uses
of the Past (Hopkins 1990) and Augustine the Reader (Harvard 1996).

For further information, contact

        This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Daniel Traister
Walter H. and Leonore Annenberg Rare Book and Manuscript Library
Van Pelt-Dietrich Library, University of Pennsylvania

Jobs in Early Modern Literature

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.0339  Monday 1 March 1999.

From:           Jonathan Hope <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 01 Mar 1999 12:11:17 +0000 (GMT)
Subject:        Jobs in Early Modern Literature

                 Reader/Lecturers in English Literary
                 Studies

                 Department: not specified

                 Middlesex University
                 London, UK

                 Salary: see below

                 Reader: Pounds 30,083 - 37,289 (Post ref HUM 14T)

                 Lecturers: Pounds 16,483 - 26,087 (Post ref HUM13T)

                 Three permanent posts for professionals with research
                 and teaching interests in one or more of the
                 following areas:

                 *early modern literature; *gender and
                 writing;*literacy and cultural theory; *twentieth
                 century theory;*twentieth century literature,
                 especially fiction;*contemporary writing

                 Applications are welcome from those with a completed
                 doctoral dissertation, the ability to teach at
                 undergraduate level, and specialised knowledged of
                 one or more of the above subject areas. For
                 appointment at Reader level you should have evidence
                 of substantial high-quality publication, record as an
                 established research, and experience of supervising
                 research students. Maximum starting salaries: Reader
                 Pounds 31,685; Lecturers Pounds 19,691.

                 If you have access to email you may prefer that
                 method to request further details and an application
                 form: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. Alternatively, write to:
                 Recruitment Office, Middlesex University, Bounds
                 Green Road, London N11 2NQ, or telephone 0181 362
                 6110. In all cases please quote the post reference.
                 Closing date 12 March 1999. Interviews will take
                 place on March 25.

                 Middlesex University is working towards equality in
                 opportunity

                 Job share applications will be considered.

NWP Shakespeare Professors?

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.0337  Monday 1 March 1999.

From:           Joanne Walen <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Sunday, 28 Feb 1999 22:03:36 EST
Subject:        NWP Shakespeare Professors?

Colleagues,

Would any of you know of a college professor of Shakespeare Studies who
is also a fellow of the National Writing Project? This is informational
background for an article by a colleague. You may reply offline to
<This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>.

Many thanks for any leads you can offer.

Joanne Walen

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