1999

Re: Burghley As Elizabeth's Moor

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.0541  Thursday, 25 March 1999.

[1]     From:   Karen Elizabeth Berrigan <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 24 Mar 1999 17:04:08 -0400 (AST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.0527

[2]     From:   Richard Nathan <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 24 Mar 1999 21:50:27 +0000
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.0527 Re: Burghley As Elizabeth's Moor


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Karen Elizabeth Berrigan <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 24 Mar 1999 17:04:08 -0400 (AST)
Subject: 10.0527 Re: Burghley As Elizabeth's Moor
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.0527 Re: Burghley As Elizabeth's Moor

Didn't Elizabeth refer to Burghley as Spirit?

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Richard Nathan <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 24 Mar 1999 21:50:27 +0000
Subject: 10.0527 Re: Burghley As Elizabeth's Moor
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.0527 Re: Burghley As Elizabeth's Moor

Someone else wrote to me by private e-mail, confirming what Stephanie
Hughes said about the "Moor" being Walsingham, not Burghley.

I believe Burghley and Walsingham were both in the scenes when the Queen
used the nickname "My Moor."  I thought she was addressing Burghley, but
it appears I was wrong.

Thanks to all.

Media Sendups

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.0540  Thursday, 25 March 1999.

From:           Ed Pixley <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 24 Mar 1999 14:59:17 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: 10.0518 Media Sendups
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.0518 Media Sendups

Many have recently enjoyed citing allusions to Sh. plays in the media.
Last night on a TNT rerun of the final episode of DUE SOUTH, a
delightfully written series about a Canadian mountie attached to Chicago
PD, featuring a deaf wolf and frequent guest shots by such notable
Canadian actors  as Doublas Campbell and Tony-award winning Brent
Carver, we saw a wonderful spoof of St. Crispen's Day
heroics-commemorating forever this llth of March.

Ever looking northward,
Ed Pixley

Re: Scarlet Cloth Costume

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.0538  Thursday, 25 March 1999.

[1]     From:   Catherine Loomis <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 24 Mar 1999 11:04:16 -0600 (CST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.0529 Scarlet Cloth Costume

[2]     From:   David Evett <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 24 Mar 1999 12:57:47 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.0529 Scarlet Cloth Costume


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Catherine Loomis <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 24 Mar 1999 11:04:16 -0600 (CST)
Subject: 10.0529 Scarlet Cloth Costume
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.0529 Scarlet Cloth Costume

> I'd like to ask for some help from the list members.  I'm trying to
> construct an authentic as possible of the scarlet cloth costume that
> Shakespeare would have worn for the 1603 coronation of King James.  Can
> anyone point me to contemporary paintings, drawings, designs,
> descriptions etc. that would help me come up with enough to do a good
> pattern for all the pieces?
>
> Joe Conlon, Warsaw, IN, USA

There is a watercolor of Elizabeth's funeral procession in the British
Library; part of it is reproduced in the Riverside Shakespeare (Plate
7).  I don't have the manuscript mark.  Although these are funeral
robes, they are processional and are shown from various angles.

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           David Evett <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 24 Mar 1999 12:57:47 -0500
Subject: 10.0529 Scarlet Cloth Costume
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.0529 Scarlet Cloth Costume

>Can anyone point me to contemporary paintings, drawings, designs,
>descriptions etc. that would help me come up with enough to do a good
>pattern for all the pieces?

Joe Conlon asks a tricky question.  From assorted late C16 and early C17
engravings, paintings, and drawings we can get a sense of the clothes
that servants (Shakespeare's putative role on this occasion) wore, and
there are various more or less reliable books on early modern English
costume to which Joe Conlon could go for help.  But the culture's iconic
sense of costume meant that on special occasions an element of the
fanciful or allegorical or historical might enter the process.  Hence
there's no way to know what the King's Men wore on the occasion.  The
closest visual analogues I can think of are these:

1.  Thomas Lant's engraving of the funeral procession of Sir Philip
Sidney (1586).
2.  The illustrations of John Derricke's *Image of Ireland* (1581),
which include representations of several public ceremonies.
3.  The funeral portrait of Sir Henry Unton (c. 1596), another funeral
procession, but also a party or two.
4.  Robert Peake's (?) picture of Elizabeth carried in procession (c.
1601), especially the row of men lining the processional route, though
details are hard to see--probably the best single source.
5.  Inigo Jones' designs for masques, full of suggestions about iconic
costume, though mostly a decade or more later than this event.

Items 1 and 2 can be seen in libraries that have the works listed in the
Short Title Catalogue in xerox or microform-it does not appear to me
that either Notre Dame or Purdue has these, though you can look at a C19
facsimile of the Derricke at ND.  3 and 4 are both widely reproduced,
but Roy Strong's Cult of Elizabeth has extensive analyses of both
paintings with illustrations that include details, and I'd look at them
in that book if you can get at it.  The surviving Jones drawings are
assembled in Steven Orgel and Roy Strong, *Inigo Jones: the Theatre of
the Stuart Court.*

Hope this helps.

David Evett

Re: A Question about poetry

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.0539  Thursday, 25 March 1999.

[1]     From:   W. L. Godshalk <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 24 Mar 1999 12:43:41 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.0528 A Question about poetry

[2]     From:   Roger Gross <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 24 Mar 1999 12:06:02 -0600 (CST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.0528 A Question about poetry

[3]     From:   Tiffany Rasovic <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 24 Mar 1999 13:12:27 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.0528 A Question about poetry

[4]     From:   Ward Elliott <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 24 Mar 1999 14:00:29 -0800 (Pacific Standard Time)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.0528 A Question about poetry

[5]     From:   Laura Fargas <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 24 Mar 1999 22:40:59 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.0528 A Question about poetry


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           W. L. Godshalk <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 24 Mar 1999 12:43:41 -0500
Subject: 10.0528 A Question about poetry
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.0528 A Question about poetry

Try Hugh Holman and William Ruth Harmon, A Handbook to Literature.

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Roger Gross <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 24 Mar 1999 12:06:02 -0600 (CST)
Subject: 10.0528 A Question about poetry
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.0528 A Question about poetry

Dear Stephanie,

Please forgive me for saying that your question is about VERSE, not
POETRY.  Not all Verse is Poetry and not all Poetry is in Verse.  Big
difference.

The two best books at this time are by Marina Tarlinskaja and by George
Wright (SHAKESPEARE'S METRICS).  Soon, these two will be joined by my
SPEAKING SHAKESPEARE'S VERSE.  Sorry I don't have the titles of the
Tarlinskaja book with me.  Also, I may have slightly misspelled Marina's
last name.

Roger Gross
Univ. of Arkansas

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Tiffany Rasovic <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 24 Mar 1999 13:12:27 -0500
Subject: 10.0528 A Question about poetry
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.0528 A Question about poetry

Perhaps A Glossary of Literary Terms by MH Abrahms....

[4]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Ward Elliott <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 24 Mar 1999 14:00:29 -0800 (Pacific Standard Time)
Subject: 10.0528 A Question about poetry
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.0528 A Question about poetry

> A friend has asked me to post and ask if anyone knows of a book that
> gives definitive explanations of: feminine endings, open endings,
> mid-line speech endings, line endings and weak endings. He knows what
> they are, but needs something he can cite.

Some basic Shakespeare figures from these tests can be found in F.E.
Halliday, A Shakespeare Companion, Duckworth & Co. London, 1952, pp.
680-682, but not much on definitions.  Some definitions and more recent
figures can be found in Donald Foster, Elegy by W.S., 1989, others in
Marina Tarlinskaja, Shakespeare's Verse, 1987, yet others in various
writings of Brian Vickers. Halliday in 1952 thought the best and most
detailed verse-test figures were those of E.K. Chambers, William
Shakespeare, II, 397-408.

[5]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Laura Fargas <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 24 Mar 1999 22:40:59 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 10.0528 A Question about poetry
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.0528 A Question about poetry

On the assumption that this is a question about scansion, rather than
dramatic technique:

In a word, no.  But I think you can put them together from an amalgam of
the following: Louis Turco, The New Book of Forms (A Handbook of
Poetics); Paul Fussell, Jr., Poetic Meter and Poetic Form;  Harvey
Gross, The Structure & Meaning of [Rhythm? Rhyme?] -- ( brown paperback,
goes in and out of print, and I'm having a fit now because I can't find
it); John Hollander, Rhyme's Reason; and the Princeton Encyclopedia of
Poetry and Poetics.  Also interesting for its opinions is C.P. Smith,
Pattern and Variation in Poetry.

"Definitive explanation?"  Feminine ending can be defined as ending on
an unstressed syllable, but there are different kinds of feminine
endings, and how you want to explain the effect of the "fall" can be
debated.  There is, for example, a triple-feminine ending called
"strucciolo" (if memory serves; I can't find it in the indices of Turco
and Fussell), which I think will infallibly produce a comic effect, but
I've had students argue the point in a plausible way.

I've also found it useful to study classical concepts of scansion H.L.
West's Greek Metre, and Greek & Latin Meter, a really excellent,
extremely compact pamphlet by Rosenmeyer (Rosenmeier?) -- Chairman of
Classics at U. C. Berkeley-and there's also a good study of scansion of
early English forms (it was someone's doctoral thesis, Hilda something?
-- it appears to be off with Harvey Gross' book somewhere).

Laura Fargas

Re: Iago; Gower; Miola; Beard; Burton; Henry

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.0537  Thursday, 25 March 1999.

[1]     From:   Ed Taft <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 24 Mar 1999 12:07:02 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Iago

[2]     From:   Ed Taft <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 24 Mar 1999 12:15:51 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Henry

[3]     From:   Larry Weiss <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 24 Mar 1999 13:00:53 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.0521 Miola's Complaint

[4]     From:   Melissa Cook <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 24 Mar 1999 18:48:14 -0800 (PST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.0526 Re: Beard

[5]     From:   H. R. Greenberg <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 24 Mar 1999 18:52:02 EST
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.0468 Q: Burton Hamlet

[6]     From:   Brian Haylett <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tue, 23 Mar 1999 19:47:23 -0000
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.0502 Re: Henry's Order to Kill His Prisoners


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Ed Taft <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 24 Mar 1999 12:07:02 -0500 (EST)
Subject:        Iago

Bill Godshalk usefully points out that sound often leads to sense,
especially on the stage. If Iago's name sounded like "Jago," and it
probably did, as far as I can tell, then there's another level of
allegory for you: the king himself-and performed at court in 1604, I
believe.  I'd only add that James was often full of himself:
Iago=Jago=Ego.

--Ed Taft

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Ed Taft <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 24 Mar 1999 12:15:51 -0500 (EST)
Subject:        Henry

When I wrote that "Gower has the sequence of events wrong," I was
referring to which came first, the killing of the boys or the order to
kill the prisoners. Sorry for not being clearer about this point.  We
hear the order (and probably see it executed) in 4.6 as a response to
the French "throng" apparently ABOUT to attack. Then, in 4.7, we see the
dead boys. But Gower says that the king gave the order to kill the
prisoners as a response to the killing of the boys (and as a response to
his tent being looted). Gower seems wrong here, and my last post was an
attempt to explain why he might think what he does. The order in which
the boys were killed and then the tent looted doesn't really matter,
does it Larry? As you say, it could have happened either way. Gower's
interest in the king's "spoils" probably tells us something about his
character and his values.

--Ed Taft

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Larry Weiss <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 24 Mar 1999 13:00:53 -0500
Subject: 10.0521 Miola's Complaint
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.0521 Miola's Complaint

John Cox wrote:

>Thanks to Robert Miola for a remarkably restrained and civil response to
>a fairly brutal injury.  Posting such a response on SHAKSPER strikes me
>as an appropriate way to deal with that kind of treatment-letting a wide
>audience know about it without being rancorous.  It's an effective way
>to get justice in the court of scholarly opinion, if nowhere else.

As someone who is used to outraged clients insisting on immediate and
Draconian relief (if nothing better is available), I, too, was struck by
Professor Miola's equanimity.

But, while such phlegmatism might be good for his blood pressure and
digestion, it does precious little to correct the injury.  I question
that posts to the list are an "effective way to get justice" even
limited to the "court of scholarly opinion."  How many of the readers of
the rip-off, now or into the mists of time, will be subscribers to this
list?  Wouldn't it be better to enjoin further distribution and recall
the infringing copies?

Larry Weiss

[4]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Melissa Cook <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 24 Mar 1999 18:48:14 -0800 (PST)
Subject: 10.0526 Re: Beard
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.0526 Re: Beard

>>Viola's "I would not have it grow on my chin."
>>I have long wondered about this line.  Should the
>>emphasis be on "my" or
>>on "chin"?
>
>Or perhaps on "not" or "grow'?

In my opinion, the stress could be put almost anywhere depending on what
point you want to get across.   The emphasis being put on "I" would say
something like "someone else might want one to grow on my chin but I
sure as heck wouldn't."   Accenting "my" would be saying that a beard
growing on someone else's chin is fine but not on hers.  Stressing
"grow" would suggest that a beard would be better doing something else
with her chin than growing on it or, finally, "chin" to suggest she may
want a "beard" to grow somewhere else and I'll just leave that comment
where it lies.  Hope that wasn't too garbled.

-Melissa

[5]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           H. R. Greenberg <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 24 Mar 1999 18:52:02 EST
Subject: 10.0468 Q: Burton Hamlet
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.0468 Q: Burton Hamlet

Yes, the film of the so-called "rehearsal" Hamlet is available. I saw
the original production when it was simulcasted across America on closed
circuit TV in the mid-Sixties. The recording quality is not great, but
Burton is memorable. I picked up my copy in the bookstore at the
Stratford Ontario Shakespeare Festival last year. I'm sure you can find
it on the net. Try EBAY.com on the WWW inter alia.

[6]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Brian Haylett <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tue, 23 Mar 1999 19:47:23 -0000
Subject: 10.0502 Re: Henry's Order to Kill His Prisoners
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.0502 Re: Henry's Order to Kill His Prisoners

Mike Jensen says:  'I am not persuaded, but it is food for thought - and
I always appreciate a good meal.'

There's a relief. I had begun to think I was side-salad to Stephanie.

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