1999

Macbeth: Response and Query

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.0521  Wednesday, 23 March 1999.

[1]     From:   Sean Lawrence <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 23 Mar 1999 12:56:48 -0800
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.0513 Re: Macbeth

[2]     From:   Alicia Shank <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 24 Mar 1999 00:14:28 -0600
        Subj:   Q: Biblical Allusions in Macbeth


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Sean Lawrence <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 23 Mar 1999 12:56:48 -0800
Subject: 10.0513 Re: Macbeth
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.0513 Re: Macbeth

Larry Weiss observes that he finds

>it interesting to contrast Macbeth's regicide with
>Claudius's, for whom the elimination of King Hamlet was the end all and
>the be all, until, of course, he was forced by a quite understandable
>instinct for self-preservation to attempt one further assurance.
>Claudius, unlike Macbeth, is not essentially tyrannical.

Perhaps Claudius illustrates the tendency of those who unlawfully rise
to power to inevitably become tyrants. His career seems to illustrate
Macbeth's "I am steep'd in blood so far, that would I wade no more,
returning were as tedious as go o'er." I'm quoting from memory, but I
believe that Richard III says something similar, as well.

Cheers,
Se


Miola's Complaint

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.0521  Wednesday, 23 March 1999.

[1]     From:   John Cox <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 23 Mar 1999 10:48:15 -0500
        Subj:   Miola's Complaint

[2]     From:   Michele Marrapodi <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 24 Mar 1999 11:47:15 +0100 (GMT+0100)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.0506 Miola's Shakespeare's Rome


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           John Cox <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 23 Mar 1999 10:48:15 -0500
Subject:        Miola's Complaint

Thanks to Robert Miola for a remarkably restrained and civil response to
a fairly brutal injury.  Posting such a response on SHAKSPER strikes me
as an appropriate way to deal with that kind of treatment-letting a wide
audience know about it without being rancorous.  It's an effective way
to get justice in the court of scholarly opinion, if nowhere else.

John Cox

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Michele Marrapodi <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 24 Mar 1999 11:47:15 +0100 (GMT+0100)
Subject: 10.0506 Miola's Shakespeare's Rome
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.0506 Miola's Shakespeare's Rome

We were surprised (and, indeed, amazed) to read of the misattribution
and misuse of Robert Miola's essay on Cymbeline. As one of the most
innovative exponents of the classical legacies in early modern drama,
Miola deserves proper acknowledgement for his outstanding contribution
to Shakespeare studies.

More generally, this unfortunate error might well open a discussion on
the uses and functions of collecting past criticism as a means of
justifying new theoretical agendas. Every novelty in literary study
emerges within the context of previous work and we must acknowledge our
links with tradition.  No new academic product arises independent of a
legacy of close reading and literary theory. And we should mistrust any
pronouncement which attempts to score easy points by challenging earlier
scholarship.

Michele Marrapodi
Michael J. Redmond
University of Palermo
Dipartimento di Scienze filogiche e linguistiche

Guildhall Site

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.0519  Tuesday, 22 March 1999.

From:           Ron Dwelle <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 23 Mar 1999 09:19:10 -0500
Subject:        Guildhall Site

Yahoo's "Sites of the Week" featured the following--not a bad site:

Collage

        http://collage.nhil.com/

London's Guildhall Library and Guildhall Art Gallery present their
collection of prints, drawings, and maps that focus on London topography
and six centuries of civic life on the river Thames. Search or browse
this vast image-base for whatever bit of visual London you fancy: tea
rooms, tobacconists, the Tower of London. You can purchase prints in a
choice of sizes, but you'll need to figure your costs in Her Majesty's
currency.

Appreciation for the Editor

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.0520  Wednesday, 23 March 1999.

From:           Barrett Fisher <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 23 Mar 1999 10:35:55 -0500
Subject:        Appreciation for the Editor

SHAKSPEReans:

I am sure that I speak for many on this list when I express my
appreciation for, and admiration of, the excellent work Hardy Cook does
in facilitating a wide-ranging, learned, inviting, and stimulating
global conversation about things Shakespearean.

Though I was not personally affected by his recent "gaffes," his
gracious correction of those errors is typical of the generous spirit
and conscientious assiduity with which he manages this list.  Moreover,
it is because he is so highly competent and thoroughly professional that
such lapses are even noticeable in the first place.

I for one am grateful for his dedication to this forum of wit, learning,
and good humor.

Barrett Fisher
Bethel College (MN)

Top Ten

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.0518  Tuesday, 22 March 1999.

From:           Jack Heller <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 23 Mar 1999 09:13:19 -0500 (EST)
Subject:        Top Ten

Since others on this list note the websites with humor from or about
Shakespeare, some may want to see the Top Ten Things Shakespeare Would
Say If He Were Alive Today on the Lateshow with David Letterman page.
The address is <199.173.162.17/lateshow/topten>. Click the link to the
Top Ten Extra page as well.

Jack Heller

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